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IN MEMORIAM 



WILFRED E. BALDWIN 
DANIEL H. BALLOU, SR. 
CHESTER A. BRUCE, JR. 
JOSEPH J. CAGNINA, JR. 
GLEN CONNOLLY 
DORA I. CORNISH 
JOSEPH J. CUOCO 
CHARLES L. ELLSWORTH 
JOHN J. "SILVER FOX" FULLERTON 
JOHN E. HAYWARD 
MELVIN F. KEOUGH 
MARGARET JORDAN 
CECIL O. LANCASTER 
BERNARD P. MCMAHON 
BERNADETTE P. MOEGELIN 
JOHN J. QUINN 
CHARLES SHIERE 
PHILIP J. SPELMAN 

PAUL F. WHITE 
MILDRED F. WOODS 



(front cover) 

Nilinington Veterans' Monument 
Town Cojrmon 

Dedicated November 11, 1999 to the 
men and women of Wilmington who 
unselfishly served their country. 

"Jn recognition of those who 
served - in remembrance of those 
who did not return. " 



Table of Cooteints 



Title 

Mission Statement 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Manager 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk , 

Board of Registrars , 

Town Counsel , 

Board of Assessors , 

Town Treasurer/Collector , 

Town Accountant , 

Public Safety Fire Department , 

Police Department , 

Animal Control Officer , 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department , 

Permanent Building Committee , 

Department of Public Works , 

Water and Sewer Department , 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs ..Library , 

Council for the Arts , 

Carter Lecture Fund 

Historical Commission , 

Recreation Department , 

Elderly Services Department 

Disabilities, Commission on 

Housing Authority 

Veterans' Services 

Board of Health 

Cable T. V. Advisory Task Force 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Education Wilmington Public Schools 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc . Tech. H. S... 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department 

Housing Partnership , 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee. 

Middlesex Canal Commission , 

Inspector of Buildings , 

Board of Appeals 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 

Annual Town Election - April 17, 1999.... 

Annual Town Meeting - April 24, 1999 

Special Town Meeting - November 15, 1999. 

Directory of Officials 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 

Officers and Department Heads 

Municipal Services Guide 

Meeting Dates and Times 

Accepted Streets 

Telephone Directory by Department 




The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 



"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and ^ 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 
Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion must 
govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the Town. 
Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important 
resource and the key to its success in serving the people of M 



Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 




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Town of Wilmington 

121 61 (in "Road 
Wilmington, Mfl 01857-5597 



Office of thiz fax (978) 655-3534 

Board of Sizlizcfmfzn TJy (978) 69'!l-14ir 

(978) 658-3311 

Due, in part, to the longest sustained period of economic growth on record, 
Wilmington's convenient location, moderate tax rate and good schools, the 
demand for homes remains strong. The occupancy rate for commercial and 
industrial property remains high, resulting in job opportunities and 
significant property tax revenue to pay for town services. The Board of 
Selectmen remain focused on balancing the opportunities associated with 
growth against the costs to the quality of life that residents have come to 
expect in Wilmington. 

The Board appointed a Master Plan Committee comprised of residents, 
stakeholders and town officials. This committee will continue the work 
started by the Master Plan Advisory Committee. Wilmington, along with North 
Reading, Reading and Burlington, received grant funding through the Planning 
for Growth Program funded by the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. 
These funds, coupled with funds appropriated at a previous town meeting, will 
enable Wilmington to develop a growth management and watershed protection 
plan in conjunction with the three other communities in the upper Ipswich 
River Watershed. Working with Planners Collaborative, Inc., the committee 
will develop a vision about how Wilmington could look and recommend growth 
management policies to move the community in the direction of this desired 
vision. Such policy recommendations will be submitted for approval at a 
future town meeting. 

While much of the news over the past year is positive, the Selectmen are 
concerned about potential environmental impacts on the health of some of our 
residents. At the request of the Board of Health, the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health, Division of Community Assessment is conducting a 
cancer cluster survey to determine whether incidents of cancer are abnormally 
high in any areas of Wilmington. Investigation and testing of an area off 
McDonald Road by the state and federal environmental agencies is ongoing. 
Illegal dumping apparently occurred at this location at some time in the 
past. The Selectmen will continue to work with the Board of Health to ensure 
that the town responds appropriately to these issues. 

Work continues on several key intersections and roadways throughout the 
community. Upgrading water mains and the installation of sewer lines along 
Main and Adelaide Streets was substantially completed by year's end. The 
town recognizes the serious inconvenience that this construction project 
imposed upon residents and businesses along the route and extends its 
heartfelt thanks for their patience and cooperation. We fully expect the 
long-term benefits to outweigh the short-term costs. 



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Engineering work for the reconstruction of Lowell Street from the 
intersection with Route 38 to the intersection with Woburn Street is nearing 
completion. Once the Massachusetts Highway Department has approved a final 
engineering design and funding is in place the actual reconstruction will 
begin. While the state has agreed to pay for the cost of construction, the 
availability of funding is impacted by other state projects. 

Work on the Burlington Avenue bridge replacement continues and is expected to 
be completed by the summer of 2000. Bid specifications for the signalization 
of the Route 62/Woburn Street intersection will be issued this spring. 
Construction will likely start in the fall and could be completed in the 2000 
construction season. Turning lanes and sidewalks at the intersection will 
also be included in the project. 

The Massachusetts Highway Department is proposing to reconstruct the 
interchange at Interstate 93/Route 125/Ballardvale Street. Selectmen voted 
to endorse the so-called, "2A alternative." This design will create an 
opportunity for economic development of property abutting Route 125 while at 
the same time minimize the impact of increased traffic on residential 
neighborhoods in that area. 

Discussions between the Selectmen, the town's state legislative delegation, 
the Planning Board and representatives from the Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority (MBTA) , regarding the construction of a commuter 
rail station on Main Street, have been ongoing throughout the year. Land 
takings for the affected properties have been completed by the MBTA. In 
November the Board voted three in favor, two opposed to withdraw support for 
the parking lot unless the town's traffic consultant. Fay, Spofford and 
Thorndike (FS&T) , is included in discussions with the MBTA and Massachusetts 
Highway Department over mitigation of the anticipated traffic impacts 
resulting from the new parking facility and further that FS&T's final 
recommendations be adopted by these two state agencies without reducing 
parking spaces allotted to the town. This vote of conditional support 
followed a recommendation of the Planning Board to deny the MBTA' s 
application for a commuter rail station based upon several specific reasons, 
the most important of which was the MBTA' s unwillingness to adopt the traffic 
mitigation measures recommended by FS&T. 

The Board acknowledges and extends its appreciation to two of our ad hoc 
committees. The Veterans' Memorial Committee did a superb job in 
recommending the site and design for the Veterans' Monument. This monument, 
dedicated to the tremendous sacrifices of some selfless Wilmington residents, 
was unveiled at the Town Common on Veterans' Day. We also extend our thanks 
to Donald Onusseit, Public Works Superintendent for his efforts in assisting 
the committee and to his public works crew for setting the monument. The 
Municipal Golf Course and Recreation Area Feasibility Study Committee 
completed their evaluation of potential sites, the associated costs and the 
potential benefits of a golf course/recreation area and concluded that due to 
the lack of available land such a facility is not feasible at this time. A 
regulation par 72 golf course would require a minimum of 100 usable acres of 
land. The Board thanks the members of the committee for their commitment of 
time and energy. 



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On June 24, 1999 the Town Hall athletic fields were rededicated as Robert P. 
Palmer Park in honor of Mr. Palmer, former Public Works Superintendent, who 
devoted over 44 years of public service to the Town of Wilmington. A granite 
monument naming the park in Mr. Palmer's honor was unveiled. 

The ability of "Town Hall" to sustain and improve upon the quality of life in 
Wilmington is predicated upon the dedication of many people both paid and 
unpaid. The Board of Selectmen recognizes the dedication of these unsung 
heroes and extends our deepest thanks . As Harry Emerson Forsdick once said 
"Democracy is based upon the conviction that there are extraordinary 
possibilities in ordinary people." 




Robert J. Cain, Chairman 




Board of Selectmen — left to right: Daniel C. Wandell, MichaelJ. Newhouse, 
Chairman Robert J. Cain (seated), James J. Rooney and Michael V. McCoy. 



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Town of Wilmington 

1 2 1 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON, MA 01887 



OFFICE OF THE FAX (978) 658-3334 

TOWN MANAGER TTY (978) 694-1417 
(978) 658-3311 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

I am privileged to submit my tenth annual report as Wilmington's Town 
Manager. When I submitted my initial report for the calendar year 1990, I 
quoted Oliver Wendell Holmes who said, "The greatest thing in this world is 
not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving." An 
examination of local government during this past decade reveals an 
extraordinary effort by Wilmington citizens to move forward on a path of 
progress, focused on improving our quality of life. 



Ten years ago we were mired in an economic downturn that threatened to stymie 
Wilmington's ability to move forward. Local government faced mounting 
obligations during a period of diminished resources. Tough choices mandated 
painful budget cuts and a needed re -examination of how local government 
conducted the people's business. Perhaps better than any other year of the 
past decade, 1999 best exemplifies Wilmington's commitment to providing the 
best in service while maintaining a solid financial foundation designed to 
meet important future obligations. 



I am pleased to report that the town is in its strongest financial position 
in decades. In November of 1999, the Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
certified that the amount of free cash (available funds) as of July 1, 1999 
stood at nearly $3.7 million, an increase of $1.25 million over the previous 
year. The current balance represents the highest free cash level in the 
town's history. More significantly, it represents a better than $5.1 million 
turnaround from the early 1990 's when the town was reporting a negative free 
cash position of more than $1.5 million. This positive indicator of the 
town's financial condition will serve to strengthen Wilmington's bond rating 
and enable the town to supplement important budget initiatives without the 
necessity of tax overrides . 

As 1999 drew to a close, the Commonwealth certified the town's new revenue 
growth at just over $1.3 million. This unprecedented increase in growth 
valuation was largely the result of two significant factors. First, an 
increase in property value of $20 million is directly attributable to the 
townwide cyclical reinspection project conducted by the Board of Assessors. 
Not only did this comprehensive data collection create a more fair and 
uniform tax base, it represented a sound business decision. Although the 
town spent $110,000 to fund this project, it will yield over $300,000 in new 
tax revenue in the first year alone. A comparable increase in new growth tax 
revenue will be realized as a result of the Avalon Oaks apartment complex on 
Salem Street . 



The town has worked hard to establish sufficient reserves to meet important 
capital needs. For example, voters at the April Town Meeting rescinded 
authorization to borrow $1,000,000 to finance the design and construction of 



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a raw water main because the project was completed without the necessity of 
borrowing. The ability to pay for major projects without incurring borrowing 
costs represents a significant savings for ratepayers. Last year alone, over 
$1.5 million in operating funds were earmarked for capital equipment 
purchases and for infrastructure and facility improvements. 

In 1999 a settlement agreement was reached between the North East Solid Waste 
Committee (NESWC) and Wheelabrator for the air emissions control project at 
the North Andover trash to energy facility. Wilmington is among 23 
communities in the NESWC consortium that operate under a 20-year service 
agreement to dispose non-recycled solid waste at the North Andover plant. 
Under the terms of the settlement agreement, NESWC communities contributed 
$17 million or 48% of the total cost of the retrofit while Wheelabrator paid 
the remaining $18.5 million. The agreement ended a two year quest to reduce 
an onerous financial burden on taxpayers in the 23 cities and towns. 

Wilmington's share of the settlement, $742,312, was paid through the town's 
Tip Fee Stabilization Account which was established to help mitigate major 
increases in trash disposal costs. Because of the terms of the settlement 
agreement, no additional appropriation was required. The capital cost 
savings to Wilmington as a result of the agreement is $807,810. In addition, 
NESWC communities will avoid $5 to $10 million in additional financing costs. 

Two major construction projects dominated the attention of school and 
municipal officials throughout the past year. By year's end, the 148,000 
square foot middle school was on track to open on schedule to 900, 6"^*^, 7^^*^ and 
8'^'' grade students. Construction has also begun on the new public safety 
building which will serve as headquarters for the Police and Fire 
Departments. It is expected that the 36,000 square foot facility will open 
its doors in November of 2000. 

A number of improvements were made to the town's property in 1999 including: 

* The reconstruction of the soccer fields located at the Shawsheen 
School . 

* The installation of a Veterans' Monument at the Town Common. 

* The substantial completion of the Route 38 sewer extension and 
water main project. 

* The replacement of roofs at the High School, Silver Lake Beach 
House and 4"^"^ of July Building. 

* The installation of a new boiler at the Wildwood School. 

* The replacement of windows at the Intermediate Schools; the 
improvements to the grounds at the Wildwood and North 
Intermediate Schools; and the upgrade of electrical wiring at the 
Wildwood, North Intermediate and High School. 

* The installation of a new fire alarm system at the West 
Intermediate School . 

* The construction of sidewalks on Ballardvale Street and the 
reconstruction of sidewalks on Salem Street. 

* The reconstruction of Salem Street. 

* The refurbishment of the Shawsheen Avenue wellfield. 



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Voters also appropriated funds to reconstruct the North Wilmington parking 
area; to begin the implementation of a comprehensive geographical information 
system; to complete the installation of an upgraded mobile data system for 
the Police Department; and to purchase replacement vehicles and equipment in 
municipal and school departments . 

There were many important initiatives undertaken this past year, they 
include : 

* The appointment of a townwide Master Plan Committee, an Open 
Space and Recreation Plan Committee and a Waste Water Study 
Advisory Committee. 

* The appointment of a part-time Curator for the Harnden Tavern 
Museum . 

* The opening of a Community Policing Storefront at Wilmington 
Plaza during the holiday season. 

* The establishment of the first Elderly Care Givers Forum and the 
development of a geriatric internship program in the Elderly 
Services Department . 

* The introduction of Internet classes for library patrons. 

* The development of a water conservation plan and the publication 
by the Water Department of its first consumer confidence report. 

* The sponsorship of a two day community access monitoring training 
program . 

* The implementation of a regional household hazardous waste 
collection program. 

* The first operating year of the Title 5 betterment loan program 
which enabled the town to assist five homeowners to replace their 
septic systems . 

In 1999 the town enhanced its technology capabilities in all departments 
while managing the Y2K changeover without a hitch. Voters supported the 
adoption of enabling legislation making Wilmington one of the first 
communities in the state to ensure property tax equity among all taxpayers. 

In 1999 residential and commercial sewer ratepayers received reductions of 22 
1/2% and 7 1/2% respectively. The new rates are the lowest since 1988. 
Meanwhile, water rates remained unchanged for the third consecutive year. 
Today's water rate is the lowest of the past 12 years. 

For the past several years, the town has been successful in its solicitation 
of federal and state grants. Recent grants have been received for elderly 
services, recycling, small business loans, employment assistance, technology, 
health services, fire prevention, community policing, planning and library 
services. Recently the town was awarded $575,365 from Community Development 
Block Grant (CDBG) funds for a townwide housing rehabilitation program. 
Funds will be available to assist income eligible residents make improvements 
to their homes. It is expected that at least 27 dwellings will be upgraded 
through this program. Since 1991 the town has been awarded almost $2 million 
in CDBG funding. 



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"Having just a vision is no solution . 
Everything depends on execution." 

Those lyrics from a popular Stephen Sondheim song sum up the importance of 
the many citizen volunteers, town officials and employees who make government 
"tick." I extend my appreciation to the hundreds of individuals whose energy 
and hard work serve to make Wilmington a better place in which to live. 

The town acknowledges several board members who stepped down from their 
positions in 1999. Among them were Anthony Krzeminski of the Finance 
Committee, Anita Backman and Philip Fenton of the Board of Appeals, James 
Mahoney of the Board of Health and Kathleen Black Reynolds from the 
Historical Commission. Kenneth Mastrullo, an active member of the Wilmington 
business community, resigned from his position as a representative to the 
RMLD Advisory Board due to a job relocation, and Carole Hamilton stepped down 
from her positions on the Planning Board and Housing Partnership. Carole 
served the town with distinction for nearly 20 years. It is with sadness 
that I note the passing of former Selectman Chester Bruce. Chet was a kind 
and fair public servant dedicated to improving the quality of life in 
Wilmington. Three municipal employees retired in 1999. Dorothy Wiberg 
retired from the Library after 17 years of full and part-time service. Al 
Potenza spent 17 years in the Public Buildings Department as the Head 
Custodian at the Shawsheen School. Larry Redding was a decorated police 
officer whose courage in the face of adversity inspired an entire community. 
His official service will be missed, however the Police Department will 
continue to count on his advice and support. 

A former baseball player (no, not Yogi Berra) once offered a comment on the 
future. He said, "Whatever is going to happen is going to happen when it 
happens, regardless of what happens." There are probably a few cynics out 
there who subscribe to that theory. Despite my life long passion with 
baseball, I prefer the philosophy of Henry David Thoreau who said, "To him 
whose elastic and vigorous thought keeps pace with the sun, the day is a 
perpetual morning." I am grateful for the opportunity to serve the citizens 
of Wilmington and I look forward to the exciting challenges that lie ahead. 




Town Manager Michael A. Caira speaks with kindergarten 
students at the Boutwell Early Childhood Center 



ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 



Town Clerk 

The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer 
and Local Registrar of Vital Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged 
with the responsibility of ensuring that the appropriate process, with 
notification and procedure is adhered to in the making of legislative policy, 
and of managing public access to this information. This office is often the 
first door of government accessed by individuals seeking information and the 
resolution of problems. It is with a sense of pride and accomplishment that 
we submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our citizens 
well . 

The following information and Vital Statistics were recorded during 1999: 



Births 300 

Marriage Intentions 103 

Marriages 100 

Deaths 230 

Deaths - Out of State 13 

Burial Permits 178 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 30 



Flammable Perm.its and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town 
Clerk's office. Notice is sent to the owner or occupant of land where the 
storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal by April 30th of each 
year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's 
regulations, may result in revocation of the permit after a public hearing 
Seventy- three flammable permits were issued during the year. 

Permits & Recordings : 



Uniform Commercial Code Recordings 501 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 94 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 191 

Federal Lien Recordings 19 

Federal Lien Releases 12 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 406 

Pole Sc Conduit Locations 13 

Dog Licenses 1,500 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 2 

The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this 



capacity, she has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly 
meeting night, kept the minutes of same up to date, supervised all elections 
and the Annual Town Census by mail. The Town Clerk's office also maintains 
current voting lists and registers voters during regular office hours. She 
also meets with the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and 
to certify nomination papers for candidates. 



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Town Meetings & Elections 1999: 



Annual Town Election April 17 

Annual Town Meeting April 24 

Special Town Meeting November 15 



Board of Registrars 

In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the 
Acts of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so 
posted in the Town Hall. The Board also met many times for certification of 
signatures on nomination papers and assisted at all elections and town 
meetings . 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32, and supervised the conduct of 
elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 
63, all in accordance with the Town Charter and Inhabitant By-laws Revised of 
the Town of Wilmington. 

The calendar year of 1999 had a total of 14,117 registered voters from our 
listed 21,406 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned 
their census forms in 1999. A true census is an asset to the town. 




Infnrmatinn Sign at Rotary Park — a gift to the Town from the Rotary Club. 



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Towii Counsel 

On January 1, 1999 and during the calendar year, there were pending the 
following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of actions in which the 
Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of 
tax lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for 
abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari re 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-law and Inland Wetland Act) . 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) . 

Ruth E. Marranzini, et al v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) . 

William Baldwin, ppa, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) . 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G.L.c.93). 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al, Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) . 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) . 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa, et al v. William Clifford, Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G.L.c.229, s.2 and third party 
claim G . L . c . 231B) . 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court/appeal from decision of Board of Appeals) . 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court/appeal from decision of Board of Appeals) . 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning Official Map (c.41, s.81E)). 

Scott C. Reinhold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #91- 
4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging tortuous acts by the Wilmington 
Police Department) . 

Priscilla Collins, Administratrix Be Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) . 

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Mildred F. Woods, et al . v. Town of Wilmington , Appeals Court #97-P-0080 
(petition to determine zoning relevancy/appealed to the Appeals Court) . 

Robert McSweeney v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Appeals Court #97-P-57 (action 
for appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under 
Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U . S . C . /appealed to the 
Appeals Court) (appeals stayed at the Appeals Court pending Court imposed 
mediation) . 

Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board , 
Land Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G.L.c.41, 
s . 81BB) . 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516 
(complaint for judicial review of zoning decision) . 

Joanne M. Cuoco, et al v. Gregory Erickson, et al , Woburn District Court 
#945CV1090 (appeal from decision of Board of Health) . 

New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #219125 
(action pursuant to G.L.C.40A, s . 17 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) . 

New England Landevelopment, Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #219126 
(action pursuant to G.L.C.40A, s.l7 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) . 

William E. Leatham, III, et ux v. Town of Wilmington, et als, Middlesex 
Superior Court #95-4539 (complaint in ten counts alleging negligence and 
other matters contained in the complaint) . 

State Ethics Commission v. Arthur R. Smith, Jr. , State Ethics Commission No. 
522 (hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) . 

State Ethics Commission v. James Russo , State Ethics Commission No. 523 
(hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) . 

Albert A. Cuoco, et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Land Court #226211 
(petition for Declaratory Judgment or to Remove Cloud on Title) . 

James Piro v. Board of Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington , Woburn District 
Court #9653CV0320 (petition for Review Under G.L. c.l40, s.157). 

Esis, Inc. and Amtrack v. Town of Wilmington , Quincy District Court #96CV0804 
(claims for property damage and personal damage) . 

Brandon Cave v. Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5017 (claim 
for personal injury) . 

New England Landevelopment, Inc. v. Board of Appeals , Land Court #231224 
(action pursuant to G.L.c.41, S.81BB for judicial review of a Planning Board 
decision) . 

Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5584 
(action for declaratory judgment and claim pursuant to administrative 
procedure act) . 



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Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , State Fire Marshall's Office (appeal 
of cease and desist order) . 

James Joseph Randall, et ux v. Daniel P. Murphy, et al, Land Court #231644 
(claim for declaratory judgment and adjudication of rights concerning so- 
called paper street) . 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Ethics 
Commission , Middlesex Superior Court #96-6682 (motion by the Town to 
intervene, allowed) . 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr., v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Civil Service 
Commission (claim of appeal pursuant to G.L. c.31, s.41 and claim of appeal 
pursuant to G.L. c.31, s.43) . 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr., v. Town of Wilmington, et al , American Arbitration 
Association (claim for grievance re suspension) . 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration 
Association (claim of grievance for Robert Mauriello - overtime pay) . 

81 FF Realty Trust v. Town of Wilmington Planning Board and its Director , 
Land Court #236153 (appeal of planning board decision) . 

81 FF Realty Trust, Roger Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and 
Building Inspector , Land Court #237235 (complaint for judicial review of a 
decision of the Board of Appeals and Building Inspector) . 

George Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and Building Inspector , 
Land Court #237236 (complaint for judicial review of a decision of the Board 
of Appeals and Building Inspector) . 

Mary Nelson v. Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals and Building Inspector , 
Land Court #237237 (complaint for judicial review of a decision of the Board 
of Appeals and Building Inspector) . 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington , American 
Arbitration Association (claim of grievance for Class Action - sick leave 
bank) . 

Lawrence F. Howe v. The Town of Wilmington and Nancy Jane Slater , Land Court 
No. 240631 (Petition for Declaratory Judgment To Remove Cloud on Title) . 

David Doucette and Linda Doucette v. Charles E. Boyle, et al . , Middlesex 
Superior Court #97-4669 (Zoning Appeal) . 

Michael Stuart a/k/a Michael T. Stuart, et al . v. Town of Wilmington , Land 
Court No. 37162-S-1996-11; 3 6146 - S - 1996 - 10 ; 231790 Misc. Case (rights in 
Claremont Street, Wilmington, MA). 

Colonial Gas Company of Lowell, Middlesex County v. Town of Wilmington, 
Wilmington, MA; Robert P. Palmer of Wilmington, Middlesex County , Middlesex 
Superior Court No. 97-5048 (seeks declaratory and injunctive relief against 
Town for street openings) . 



-13- 



Christine Bramante and Howard M. Cohen v. Superintendent Geraldine O'Donnell 
and Town of Wilmington , Middlesex Superior Court #97-5683 (complaint 
concerning bus location) (defense to be provided by School Committee counsel) 

Priscilla Carciofi v. Town of Wilmington , Lowell District Court #97 - llCV-2713 
(complaint concerning money owed to her for being mini -bus driver for the 
Town of Wilmington) (defense to be provided by School Committee counsel and 
insurance company) . 

New England Landevelopment , Inc. v. Board of Appeals, et al . , Land Court 
Department #243915 (complaint for judicial review of decision of the Board of 
Appeals) . 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Car Mart, et al . Criminal complaint in 
which the Town of Wilmington filed an appearance. 

Pacheco v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Claim for workman's compensation - 
Town joined as an additional party. | 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington , American 
Arbitration Association (claim for grievance for Robert Gearty - Denied 
Overtime) ARB#11 -3 90 - 024 82 - 98 Class action Re: Yellow Dress. 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert J. Andersen , Docket # 11-390-02363-99 
Claim for disability benefits. 

Mark Nelson v. Chief of Police/Town of Wilmington Petition for judicial 
review of denial of license to carry firearms. 

Town of Wilmington v. Tighe and Bresnahan, Trustees and North Middlesex 
Savings Bank Action for Breach of Third Party Agreement for failure to 
complete project improvements. 

Town of Wilmington v. Middlesex County Retirement Board, et al . (Middlesex 
Superior Court, C.A. #99-5533) Appeal of decision of Middlesex County 
Retirement Board concerning an employee. 

James F. Murphy and William T. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington Middlesex 
Superior Court #99-1333 Land damage and taking of Eminent Domain of land 
located on Wildwood Street. 

Porchside Sandwich Company, Inc. v. Charles E. Boyle, Louis Farkas, John 
Forrest, Anita Bachman, Robert Doucette and Philip Fention As They Constitute 
The Board of Appeals Of The Town of Wilmington, And Focaccia Restaurant 
Middlesex Superior Court #99-1646 Appeal from Decision of Zoning of Appeals. 

Palmer Sciarappa and Joseph Sciarappa, Sr. v. Town of Wilmington Essex 
Superior Court #9900730 Claim for Personal Injury. 

Craig S. Newhouse, Trustee of Pulaski Street Realty Trust, et al . v. Town of 
Wilmington Suffolk Land Court Civil Action No. 254732 Action in Land Court to 
clarify title to land. 

Paul Dacko, Cheryl Dacko and Eric E. Murray v. Town of Wilmington 

Suffolk Land Court Civil Action No. 256091 Action in Land Court to clarify 

title to land. 



-14- 



James Mangano, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington Land Court Docket No. 257322 
Petition for declaratory judgment /remove cloud on Title concerning a parcel 
of land. 



Barbara Waring v. Department of Public Works - Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination Docket No. 99131791 
Claim of discrimination by Department of Public Workers - Town of Wilmington, 
on the basis of sex. 

AFSCME, Council 93, AFL-CIO v. Town of Wilmington Labor Relations Commission 
MUP-2 510 . 

************************************ 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1999, separate petitions for abatements 
before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for several different 
years . 

************************************ 

During the year 1999, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

James F. Murphy and William T. Murphy v. Town of Wilmington Middlesex 
Superior Court #99-1333 Land damage and taking of Eminent Domain of land 
located on Wildwood Street. 

Porchside Sandwich Company, Inc. v. Charles E. Boyle, Louis Farkas, John 
Forrest, Anita Bachman, Robert Doucette and Philip Fention As They Constitute 
The Board of Appeals Of The Town of Wilmington, And Focaccia Restaurant 
Middlesex Superior Court #99-1646 Appeal from Decision of Zoning of Appeals. 

Palmer Sciarappa and Joseph Sciarappa, Sr. v. Town of Wilmington Essex 
Superior Court #9900730 Claim for Personal Injury. 

Craig S. Newhouse, Trustee of Pulaski Street Realty Trust, et al . v. Town of 
Wilmington Suffolk Land Court Civil Action No. 254732 Action in Land Court 
to clarify title to land. 

Paul Dacko, Cheryl Dacko and Eric E. Murray v. Town of Wilmington 

Suffolk Land Court Civil Action No. 256091 Action in Land Court to clarify 

title to land. 

James Mangano, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington Land Court Docket No. 257322 
Petition for declaratory judgment /remove cloud on Title concerning a parcel 
of land. 

Barbara Waring v. Departm.ent of Public Works - Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination Docket No. 99131791 
Claim of discrimination by Department of Public Workers - Town of Wilmington, 
on the basis of sex. 

Mark Nelson v. Chief of Police/Town of Wilmington Petition for judicial 
review of denial of license to carry firearms. 



15- 



Richard Sparks, III v. James Diorio, Scott Garrant, Richard Green, Kevin 
Brander and Michael Sorrentino, as they are the members of and constitute the 
Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court Docket No. 
99-5267 Appeal of Planning Board Decision. 

Wilmington Fire Fighters Local 1370, lAFF v. The Town of Wilmington Demand 
for arbitration concerning fire fighter grievance. 

Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court No. 99-6090 Claims for gender discrimination, tortuous interference, 
deformation, sexual harassment and infliction of emotional distress. 

Pacheco v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Claim for workman's compensation - 
Town joined as an additional party. 

AFSCME, Council 93, AFL-CIO v. Town of Wilmington Labor Relations Commission 
MUP-2 510 . 

************************************ 

During the year 1999, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf 
of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Tighe and Bresnahan, Trustees and North Middlesex 
Savings Bank Action for Breach of Third Party Agreement for failure to 
complete project improvements. 

Town of Wilmington v. Middlesex County Retirement Board, et al . (Middlesex 
Superior Court, C.A. #99-5533) Appeal of decision of Middlesex County 
Retirement Board concerning an employee. 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert J. Andersen , Companion Complaint to Town of 
Wilmington v. Middlesex County Retirement Board, et al . filed with the 
Contributory Retirement Appeal Board concerning the involuntary 
superannuation application of the Fire Chief. 

************************************ 

During the year 1999, the following actions by or against the Town were 
disposed of : 

Altron, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington Disposed of by Court approval of Consent 
Judgment and payment of outstanding sewer charges in the amount of 
$1, 000 , 000 .00 . 

Mildred F. Woods, et al . v. Town of Wilmington , Appeals Court #97-P-57 
(petition to determine zoning relevancy/appealed to the Appeals Court) 
Land Court Civil Action Nos . 188170 and 191034. Disposed of by Settlement 
Agreement authorizing construction on four lots subject to conditions and 
dismissal of the Appeals Court matter and dismissal of all matters pending in 
the Land Court . 

Nextel v. Zoning Board of Appeals 

Claim of Appeal from adverse decision of Zoning Board of Appeals filed in the 
U.S. District Court, Boston Docket No. 98-CV12051 (Judge R. G. Stearns) 
disposed of by Execution of Lease for construction of cellular equipment on a 
water tower and dismissal of the claim pending in the Federal District Court. 



-16- 



AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington DPW American 
Arbitration Association - Grievance: Mark Wagstaff - Holiday Overtime #98- 
322-NS-JG Disposed of by Arbitrator's Decision denying grievance of holiday 
overtime pay. 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO, Local 1703 and Town of Wilmington American 
Arbitration Association - Grievance: Robert Olson - Holiday Overtime #98-180- 
NS-JG Disposed of by the parties before Arbitrator's hearing. 

Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #96-5584 
(action for declaratory judgment and claim pursuant to administrative 
procedure act) . 

Zeneca Inc. v. Daniel R. Stewart, et al , State Fire Marshall's Office (appeal 
of cease and desist order) Disposed of by Stipulation of Dismissal Without 
Prejudice and survived by contractual agreement and release of remaining 
funds . 

Richard Sparks, III v. James Diorio, Scott Garrant , Richard Green, Kevin 
Brander and Michael Sorrentino, as they are the members of and constitute the 
Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court Docket No. 
99-5267 Appeal of Planning Board Decision. Disposed of by Voluntary 
Stipulation of Dismissal with the assent of the Defendants. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. Car Mart, et al . Criminal complaint in 
which the Town of Wilmington filed an appearance. Disposed of by payment of 
fine and probation. 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 


- 2000 FISCAL YEAR 




Total Appropriation (Taxation) 


$41, 617, 831 


00 


Total Appropriation (available) 


519, 005 


00 


Total Deficit 





00 


Special Education 


5 , 798 


00 


Energy Conservation 





00 


County Retirement Assessment 


1,331,325 


00 


County Tax 


44 , 868 


00 


Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


430,446 


00 


Air Pollution Districts 


5 , 503 


00 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


4 , 882 


00 


Mosquito Control Project 


48,809 


00 


Amount Certified by Collector & 






Treasurer for Tax Title 


20 , 000 


00 


Overlay of Current Year 


700 , 000 


GO 


Cherry Sheet Offsets 


46,406 


00 


M.W.R.A 


1, 394 , 106 


00 


Final Court Judgments 





00 


RMV Surcharge 


12 , 360 


00 


Miscellaneous 


112 , 775 


00 



$42 , 136, 836 . 00 



4, 157, 278 . 00 
$46, 294, 114 . 00 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 



2000 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 


$6, 372 , 594 


00 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


1 , 921 , 665 


38 


Penalties and Interest on Taxes 


135 , 000 


00 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


400 , 00 


00 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


1,781, 153 


00 


Other Charges for Services 


180 , 000 


00 


Fees 


35,000 


00 


Rentals 





00 


Deferred Teachers Salary 


106 , 527 


00 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


20 , 000 


00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 


55 , 000 


00 


Other Department Revenue 





00 


Licenses and Permits 


230 , 000 


00 


Special Assessments 


5 , 000 


00 


Fines and Forfeits 


140 , 000 


00 


Investment Income 


400 , 000 


00 


Voted from Available Funds 


519, 005 


00 


Free Cash 





00 


Miscel laneous 


285 , 554 


00 



Real Estate 



Residential $1,18 0,931,200.00 @ 14.36 p/t $16,958,172.03 

Commercial 101,394,000 @ 31.77 p/t 3,221,287.38 

Industrial 389,313,600.00 @ 31.77 p/t 12,368,493.07 

Personal Property 36,501,830.00 @ 31.77 p/t 1,159, 663 . 14 

$33,707,615.62 



-18- 



Treasurer/ Collector 



Commitments 



• 1* 




2000 Real Estate 


$32,547, 952 


81 


2000 Personal Property 


1, 159, 663 


18 


1999 Excise 


2 , 228 , 634 


35 


1998 Excise 


51 , 554 


05 


Ambulance 


269 , 83 9 


50 


Apportioned Water Betterments 


1,007 


74 


Interest 


24 8 


50 


Apportioned Street Betterments 


1,852 


59 


Interest 


525 


71 


Apportioned Sewer Betterments 


26 , 106 


07 


Interest 


15 , 554 


97 


Sewer Liens 


32,243 


75 


Water Liens 


123,496 


87 


Electric Liens 


2,301 


75 


Total 


$36,460, 981 


84 


Collections 






Real Estate 


$30,575,029 


60 


Personal Property 


1,006,892 


5 


Excise 


2 , 231, 921 


76 


Water Betterments 


T /I /I "3 
1 , 4 4 J 


Q T 
1 


Street Betterments 


4,491 


27 


Sewer Betterments 


53 , 977 


45 


Water Liens 


125,135 


36 


Sewer Liens 


33 , 066 


65 


Electric Liens 


9, 493 


72 


Excise Interest and Charges 


25 , 959 


64 


Ambulance 


179, 663 


99 


Lien Certificates 


35, 701 


GO 


Betterment Certificates 


212 


00 


Mark and Clear Fees 


13 , 400 


00 


Water Department Collections 


4, 750, 595 


36 


Total 


$39, 046, 984 


11 





Slanlcy Smith. Trensurer/Colleclor, signing copies of his book Five Minute Whodunits at the Friends of the Library 
Annual Meeting — March 18, 1999. 



-19- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of 
Wilmington for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1999 are hereby submitted. 
This report was prepared by the Office of the Town Accountant. 
Responsibility for accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of 
the presentation, including all disclosures, rests with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate 
in all material respects and are reported in a manner designed to present 
fairly the financial position and results of operations of the various funds 
and account groups of the government. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Michael Morris 
Town Accountant 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION 

Combined Balance Sheet -All Fund Types and Account Groups 

Notes to Financial Statements 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances -All Governmental Fund 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

Schedule of Budgetary Basis Statement of Revenues and 
Expenditures Budget and Actual -General Fund 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet -Special Revenue 
Accounts 



PAGE 
22 
23 



28 



29 



30 



Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balance-Special Revenue Accounts 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity-General Fund 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Water Department 
Fund 



31 



32 



37 



Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures -Capital Project 
Fund 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 
Schedule of Trust Funds 



38 
39 
40 



•21- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



ASSETS 



TOTAL 

SPECIAL CAPITAL TRUST & LONG-TERM (MEMORANDUM 
GENERAL REVENUE PROJECTS AGENCY DEBT ONLY) 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 



9,208,645.97 3,204,029.54 22,004,231.89 1,478,108.24 



1,116,643.78 



35,895,015.64 



1.116,643.78 



LESS PROV FOR ABATES 

& EXEMPTIONS (1,180,960.09) 

TAX LIENS 363,379.67 

TAX FORECLOSURES 139,139.40 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 638,640.29 

DEPARTMENTAL 105,360.83 

BETTERMENTS 203,520.90 

USER CHARGES 102,483,01 

DUE FROM OTHER GOVTS 

AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 
RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 



354,641.25 
487,306.01 



(1,180,960.09) 
363,379.67 
139,139.40 
638,640.29 
105,360.83 
203,520.90 
457,124.26 
487,306.01 

29,250,700.00 29,250,700.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



10,696,853 76 4,045,976.80 22,004,231.89 1,478,108.24 29,250,700.00 67,475,870.69 



LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 

DEPOSITS 

NOTES PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 



2,600,200.42 205,670.17 129.619.60 15,740.70 
1,116,643 78 

1,552,524.10 841,947.26 
3.561.81 

120,571.21 



29,250,700.00 



2,951,230.89 

1,116,643.78 
2.394,471.36 
3,561.81 
29,250,700.00 
120,571.21 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



5,389.939.51 1,051,179.24 129,619.60 15,740.70 29,250,700.00 35,837,179.05 



FUND BALANCE: 
RES FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR SPEC, PURPOSE 
RES, FOR SUBSEQUENT YEARS 
RES FOR DEF. TEACHERS 
UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 



1,762,806.13 



1,960,993.03 21,874,612.29 1,462,367.54 



(213,055.00) 

3,757,163.12 1,033.804.53 



1,762,806.13 
25,297,972.86 

(213,055.00) 
4,790,967.65 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



5,306,914.25 2,994,797.56 21,874,612.29 1,462.367.54 



0.00 31,638,691.64 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



10,696.853.76 4,045.976.80 22,004.231.89 1.478.108.24 29.250,700.00 67.475.870.69 



-22- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 1999 



1 . Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is governed by an elected Board of 
Selectmen and an open Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen appoint a 
Town Manager who in accordance with Chapter 592 of 1950, serves as 
chief fiscal and administrative officer of the town. Other town 
officials are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager. 
Generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires that the 
accompanying general purpose financial statements present the Town of 
Wilmington {the primary government) and its component units. Component 
units are included in the Town's reporting entity if their operational 
and financial relationships with the Town are significant. Pursuant to 
this criteria, the following entities have been excluded from the 
accompanying general purpose financial statements: 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly as well 
as subsidizing low income housing units. 

Middlesex County Retirement System - provides county government and 
various services for member communities. 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District - 
provides education services for member communities. 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee - provides facilities for waste 
disposal for its members. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage disposal 
services . 

2 . Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for 
local governmental units except as indicated in Note 3 . The following 
is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds and 
one account group in order to comply with the limitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of 
the town. It is used to account for all financial resources 
except those required to be accounted for in another fund. 



-23- 



Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to account 
for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other than 
expendable trust or major capital projects) that are legally 
restricted to expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to account 
for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or 
construction of major capital facilities. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the town in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds 
are accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic 
measurements of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net 
income in order to demonstrate maintenance of capital. 
Expendable trust funds are accounted for in essentially the same 
manner as governmental funds . Agency funds are custodial in 
nature (assets equal liabilities) and do not involve measurement 
of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected 
to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in the 
general long-term debt group of accounts. This account group is 
not a fund. It is only concerned with the measurement of 
financial position and, therefore, is not involved with a 
measurement of the results from any operations. 

Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
incurred . 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become 
available. Available means then due or past due and receivable 
within the current period or expected to be collected soon enough 
thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash 
is received. Receipts during the sixty days immediately 
following the close of the fiscal year are also recognized as 
available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to 
intergovernmental revenues, the legal and contractual 
requirements of the numerous individual programs are used as 
guidance. There are, however, essentially two types of these 
revenues. In one, moneys must be expended on the specific 
purpose or project before any amounts will be paid to the town. 



Therefore, revenues are recognized based upon the expenditures 
recorded. In the other, moneys are virtually unrestricted as to 
purpose of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure 
to comply with prescribed compliance requirements. These 
resources are reflected as revenues at the time of receipt or 
earlier if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash 
disbursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and 
expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, 
as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is 
measurable but not available has been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 3 0th. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase 
orders, contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of 
funds are recorded in order to reserve that portion of the 
applicable appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. 
Open encumbrances at year-end are reported as reservations of 
fund balances. Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or 
liabilities. 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are recorded 
as expenditures when purchased (purchase method) . 

General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental funds. The town does not 
capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a general fixed 
asset account group, which is consistent with the practice of 
many municipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned Memorandum 
Only to indicate that they are presented only to facilitate 
financial analysis. Data in these columns do not present 
financial position, results of operations or changes in financial 
position in conformity with generally accepted accounting 
principles. Such data is not comparable to a consolidation since 
interfund eliminations have not been made. 



I 



Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Contributory Retirement 
System, a single employer plan, established under Chapter 32 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Substantially all full-time and some part-time employees of the 
town except teachers and certain administrative personnel 
employed by the School Department participate in the system. 
Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as retirement 
allowance, include both an annuity portion, funded principally 



■25 



from amounts contributed by the participants, and a pension 
portion funded by the town. 



The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of employment. 
The employer contribution by the town as determined by the 
County's actuarial valuation normal cost plus the amortization of 
the original unfunded actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. 
Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, and therefore, the town does not contribute to 
the plan. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 
For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with Chapter 
32 of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (see note 
ID) . 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at 
the time purchases is made rather than being capitalized in a 
general fixed asset group of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as 
expenditures rather than assets at time of purchase. 

Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All 
financial orders are initiated or recommended at Town meetings. 
Expenditures are limited to the line items as voted at the Town 
meetings. Department heads may not transfer, without approval, 
appropriation balances from one expenditure account to another within 
their department or budget. These along with transfers or unencumbered 
appropriation balances between departments or agencies must be approved 
at Town Meetings. 



5 . Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 
5% of its equalized valuation. Debt issued in accordance with this 
state law is designated as being inside the debt limit. In addition, 
however, a town may authorize debt in excess of that limit for specific 
purposes. Such debt when issued is designated as being outside the 
debt limit. The following summarized the annual debt service 
requirements as of June 30, 1999. 

General Obligation Bonds 



June 3 , 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


2000 


590 , 700 


55 , 545 


646, 245 


2001 


450 , 000 


24 , 244 


474 , 244 


2002 


225, 000 


5 , 512 


230, 512 




1,265, 700 


85,301 


1, 351, 001 



As of June 30, 1999, the town had authorized and unissued debt of $35,585,000 
as outlined below. 

Comprehensive Middle School $ 25,600,000 

Public Safety Building $ 8,000,000 

Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project $ 985,000 

Raw Water Main Construction $ 1,000,000 



$ 35,585,000 




Each year Town of Wilmington employees take part in 
"Denim Day" to raise funds for breast cancer research. 
Pictured are Town Accountant Michael Morris and 
part-time clerk Bibiana Gomez. 



■ J 





TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1 999 



General 



REVENUES 




General Properly Taxes 


29.568,832 98 


Tax Liens 


80,701 29 


Special Assessments 


52,85521 


Excise 


2,104.557,44 


Penalties 


143,337 36 


Licenses and Permits 


250,65675 


Intergovernmental 


5,654,939,50 


Charges for Services 


1,756,789 90 


Fines 


141,867,50 


Fees 


39,491 16 


Interest Earnings 


411,334 52 


BAN 




Other 


1,914,962 34 



Special 
Revenue 



122,129 99 
4,205 34 



1,811,738 72 
4,730,198 82 



10,830 30 



260.336,70 



Capital 
Projects 



Fiduciary 
Fund Types 
Expendable (Memorandum 



Total 



Trust 



27,985,000 00 



22,441 35 
1,135,12 
515,490,56 



52.291 39 



1,270,424 80 



Only) 

29,568,83298 
202,831 28 
57,060 55 
2,104,557 44 
143,337 36 
273,09810 
7,467,813,34 
7,002,479 28 
141,867 50 
39,491 16 
474,45621 
27,985,000 00 
3,445,723 84 



Total Revenues 


42,120,325.95 


6,939,43987 


27,985,000,00 


1,861,783 22 


78,906,549,04 


EXPENDITURES; 












General Government 


1,228,798 99 


19,768 23 


4,656,718 93 


930,140 96 


6.835.42711 


Public Safety 


4,681,800 83 


172,525 84 




434,055 42 


5.288,382 09 


Human Services 


634,816 04 


502,196 60 




13,972 60 


1.150.985,24 


Public Works 


4,064.457 08 


1,823,813 41 


1,014,121 83 


5,850 00 


6.908.242,32 


Community Development 


493,92457 


196,868,18 






690.792 75 


Building Maintenance 


2,188,082 39 


17,601 18 




47.814 33 


2.253.497 90 


Education 


19,332,840.61 


2,218,632,39 




170,568 28 


21.722.041 28 


Recreation 


102,967 69 








102,967 69 


Veterans' Services 


18,412 48 








18,412 48 


Debt and Interest 


844,814 75 








844,814,75 


Unclassified 


3,395,698,22 


10,10610 






3,405,80432 


Statutory Charges 


3,331,51617 








3,331,51617 


Capital Outlay 


566,522 64 


623,696 68 






1,190,219 32 


BAN 


00 




2,000,000 00 




2,000,000 00 


Warrant Arlicles 


199,489 40 








199,489 40 



Total Expenditures 41,084,141,86 5,585,208,61 7,670,84076 1,602,401 59 55,942,592,82 
Excess (deficiency) of 

Revenues over Expenditures 1,036,18409 1,354.231 26 20.314,15924 259.381 63 22,963,95622 

OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 

Operating Transfers In 516,552.00 516,552 00 

Operating Transfers Out (496,552.00) (20,000 00) (516,552 00) 



Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 516,552 00 (496,552 00) 00 (20,000 00) 00 

Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 

over Expenditures and Other Uses 1,552,73609 857,67926 20,314,15924 239,381 63 22,963,95622 

Fund Balance July 1,1998 4,035,235 28 2,137,118 30 1,575,426 62 1,222,985 91 8,970,76611 

Prior Period Adjustment 14,973.57 (14,973.57) 00 
Increase in Provision for 

Abatements and Exemptions (296,030 69) (296,030 69) 

Fund Balance June 30, 1999 5,306,914 25 2,994,797 56 21,874,612 29 1,462,367 54 31,638,691,64 

-28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF BUDGETARY BASIS STATEMENT OF 
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES BUDGET AND ACTUAL - GENERAL FUND 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 





GENERAL 


GENERAL 


GENERAL 




BUDGET 


ACTUAL 


VARIANCE 


REVENUES: 








General Property Taxes 


30,407,934 


29,649,534 


(758,400) 


Special Assessments 


15,000 


52,855 


37,855 


Excise 


2,050,000 


2,104,557 


54,557 


Penalties 


155,000 


143,337 


(11,663) 


Licenses and Permits 


o1/,b00 


250,65/ 


(66,843) 


Intergovernmental 


5,683,228 


5,654,940 


(28,288) 


Charges for Services 


1,718,787 


1,756,790 


38,003 


Fines 


170,000 


141,868 


(28,132) 


Fees 


50,000 


39,491 


(10,509) 


Interest Earnings 


350,000 


AAA OOCT 

411,335 


61,335 


Other 


627,500 


1,914,962 


1,287,462 


Total Revenues 


41,544,949 


42,120,326 


575,377 


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES: 








Operating Transfers 


516,552 


516,552 





Total Other Financing Sources 


516,552 


516,552 





Total Revenue and Other 








Financing Sources 


42,061,501 


42,636,878 


575,377 


EXPENDITURES: 








General Government 


1,202,491 


1,228,799 


(26,308) 


Public Safety 


4,657,905 


4,681,801 


(23,896) 


Human Sen/ices 


628,860 


634,816 


(5,956) 


Public Works 


4,424,160 


4,064,457 


359,703 


Community Development 


AQ7 -107 






Building Maintenance 


2,198,303 


2,188,082 


10,221 


Education 


19,205,249 


19,332,841 


(127,592) 


Recreation 


101,418 


102,968 


(1,550) 


Veterans Services 


20,930 


18,412 


2,518 


Debt and Interest 


875,184 


844,815 


30,369 


Unclassified 


3,708,986 


3,395,698 


313,288 


Statutory Charges 


3,884,088 


3,331,516 


552,572 


Capital Outlay 


639,450 


566,523 


72,927 


Warrant Articles 


17,350 


199,489 


(182,139) 


Total Expenditures 


42,061,501 


41,084,142 


977,359 


Excess (deficiency) of 








Revenues over Expenditures 





1,552,736 





-29- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET ■ SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



TOTAL 

RESERVED FOR REVOLVING (MEMORANDUM 

ASSETS GRANTS GIFTS APPROPRIATION FUNDS SUBTOTAL WATER ONLY) 

CASH (305,772.44) 8,643.27 390,253.50 613,607.60 706,731.93 2,497,297.61 3,204,029.54 
RECEIVABLES: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESSPROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 
TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 
MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 
DEPARTMENTAL 
BEHERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 354,641.25 354,641.25 

DUE FROM OTHER GOVTS 487,306.01 487,306.01 487,306.01 

AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR; 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 

TOTAL ASSETS 181,533.57 8,643.27 390,253.50 613,607.60 1,194,037.94 2,851,938.86 4,045,976.80 
LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 
LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 43,576.62 70,223.28 113,799.90 91,870,27 205,670.17 
DEFERRED REVENUE: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 487,306.01 487,306.01 354,641.25 841,947.26 

DEPOSITS 3,561.81 3,561.81 
NOTES PAYABLE 
PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 530,832.63 0.00 0.00 70,223.28 601,105 91 450,073.33 1,051,179.24 

FUND BALANCE: 
RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 

RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE (349,349.06) 8,643.2/ 390,253.50 543,384.32 592,932.03 1,368,061.00 1,960,993.03 
RES. FOR SUBSEQUENT YEARS 
RES. FORDEF. TEACHERS 

UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 1,033,804,53 1,033,804.53 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE (349,349.06) 8,643.27 390,253.50 543,384.32 592,932.03 2,401.865.53 2,994,797.56 
TOTAL LIABILITIES 

& FUND BALANCE 181,533.57 8,643.27 390,253.50 613,607,60 1,194,037.94 2,851,938.86 4,045,976.80 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



Grants Gifts Reserved for Revolving Water Total 
Appropriation Funds 

REVENUES 
General Property Taxes 

Tax Liens 122,129 99 122,129 99 

Special Assessments 4,205.34 4,205.34 

Excise 
Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 1,704,919 97 106,818 75 1,811,738 72 

Ctiarges for Services 1,862,617.72 2,867,581.10 4,730,198 82 

Fines 
Fees 

Interest Earnings 3,108 25 49 7,721 56 10,830 30 

BAN 

Other 17,602.00 1,689 54 100,716 45 117,915 25 22,413 46 260,336 70 



Total Revenues 1,725,630 22 1,690 03 108,438 01 2,087,351 72 3,016,329 89 6,939,439 87 

EXPENDITURES 



General Government 


19,768 23 






19,768 23 


Public Safety 


164,471 40 




8,054 44 


172,525 84 


Human Services 


26,650 04 1,84819 




473,698 37 


502,196 60 


Public Works 


353,203 95 


600 00 


1,874.14 


1,468,135.32 1,823,813 41 


Community Development 


188,989 45 


6,492 26 


1,386 47 


196,86818 


Building Maintenance 






17,601.18 


17,601 18 


Education 


734,733 25 




1,483,89914 


2,218,632 39 



Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 

Unclassified 10,10610 10,10610 

Statutory Charges 

Capital Outlay 623,696 68 623,696 68 

BAN 

Warrant Articles 



Total Expenditures 1,497,922 42 1,84819 7,092 26 1,986,513 74 2,091,832 00 5,585,208.61 

Excess (deficiency) of 

Revenues over Expenditures 227,707 80 (15816) 101,345 75 100,837 98 924,49789 1,354,231 26 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 

Operating Transfers Out (40,000.00) (456,55200) (496,55200) 



Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 

Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other Uses 

Fund Balance July 1, 1998 

Prior Period Ad|ustment 

Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 

Fund Balance June 30, 1999 



0.00 0.00 (40,00000) 

227,707 80 (15816) 61,345 75 

(577,056 86) 8,801 43 328,907 75 

(349,349.06) 8,643.27 390,25350 

-31- 



00 (456,552 00) (496,552.00) 



100,837 98 467,945 89 857,679.26 



442,54634 1,933,91964 2,137,11830 



543,384 32 2,401,865.53 2,994,797.56 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 







AMT CFWD T 


TRANSFERS 






AMT CFWD TO 








FY 99 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


tArtNUI 1 UKto 




P 1 Uu rKUrn 








FISCAL 1998 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 














Selectmen 


Salaries 




£. , / UU UU 


9 700 00 


00 


0.00 


00 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


00 


1 1 .765 00 


11,764 89 


oil 


000 


oil 




00 


14.465 00 


14,464 89 


oil 


000 


oil 


Elections 


Salanes 


00 


18 686 no 


17 402.52 


1 ,283 48 


00 


1,283 48 


Elections 


Constable 


0.00 


125 00 


125.00 


00 


000 


00 


Elections 


Expenses 


00 


4,100 00 


4,043 55 


5645 


43.50 


12 95 






00 


22,911 00 


21,571.07 


1,339 93 


43 50 


1,296 43 


Registrars 


Salanes 


00 


1,650.00 


1.650 00 


00 


000 


00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


16772 


4,600 00 


4,767 72 


000 


000 


000 










6 417 72 


00 


00 


00 


Finance Comm 


Salaries 


00 


900 00 


526 94 


373 06 


000 


37306 


Finance Comm 


Expenses 


00 


6 ^85 on 


6 351 15 


33 85 


0.00 


33 85 






00 


/ .Zoo UU 


C Q7Q AQ 

0,0/ uy 


<iUD.yi 


n nn 

U UU 


4U0 yi 


Town Manager 


Odidl y ( UWI 1 IVIal la^cl 


00 


89.036 49 


89,03649 


00 


00 


00 


Town Manager 


Salaries-Other 


00 


222,020 65 


222,020 65 


00 


00 


00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


00 


^^ 000 00 


50 073 6? 


926 38 


324 00 


602 38 


Town Manager 


Furnisti, & Equip 


00 


675 00 


653 15 


21 85 


0.00 


21 85 






u uu 




s3D 1 , / 00 y 1 




004 nn 
.jZ** UU 


ROA O*! 


Tri\A/n Armi infant 


Sal-Town Accountant 


0.00 


64,680 49 


64,680.49 


00 


00 


000 


Town Accountant 


Salanes- Other 


00 


1 1 o,uu^ 1 -J 


116 062 1Q 


00 


00 


00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 




9 d 1 no 

\\J UU 




70 47 


R1 9'i 

Q 1 ZU 


Q 00 






00 


A QO A A'^ CO 


1 QO n7i 


70 47 


61 25 


9 22 


Trpa^/Pnllprtnr 


Sal-Treas/Collector 


000 


50.148 54 


50,14854 


00 


000 


00 


Treas/Collector 


Salanes-Other 


0.00 


107.408 09 


107,408.09 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Colledor 


Expenses 


0.00 


34.475 00 


31,730.78 


2,744 22 


0.00 


2 744.22 






u uu 


1 y^.Uo 1 Do 


iOQ 007 A\ 




n nn 
U UU 


O 7 A A OO 


Town Clerk 


Salary-Town Clerk 


0.00 


55,705 23 


55.705.23 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Cler1< 


Salanes-Other 


00 


66,766 79 


66.766 79 


00 


00 


000 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


00 


4,580 00 


4.398.57 


181 43 


00 


181 43 


Town Cler1< 


Furnish, & Equip 


00 


2,000 00 


1,994 00 


6 00 


000 


600 






00 


129,052 02 


128,864 59 


187 43 


00 


187 43 


Assessors 


Sal-Pnn Assessor 


00 


67 878 26 


67 fi7A 7fi 


n nri 


n tv\ 

\J UU 


U UU 


Assessors 


Salanes-Other 


00 


68,446 38 


68,446 38 


000 


00 


00 


Assessors 


Expenses 


38,557 48 


93,800.00 


102,754 59 


29,602 89 


29,60289 


00 






38,557 48 


230,124 64 


239,079 23 


29,602 89 


29,60289 


00 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


00 


77 260 no 


77 760 on 


00 


00 


n nn 

U UU 






U UU 


/ / .^jU UU 


77 ncn nn 
/ ( ,2dU UU 


00 


00 


00 


Permanent BIdg Comm Salanes 


0.00 


2.600 00 


1.129 87 


1,470 13 


00 


1,470 13 


Permanent BIdg Comm Expenses 


0.00 


100.00 


000 


100 00 


00 


100 00 






000 


2,700 00 


1.129 87 


1,570 13 


00 


1,57013 


General Government Subtotal 


38,725 20 


1,226,944 11 


1,228.798 99 


36,870 32 


30,031.64 


6,838 68 


PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY: 














Police 


Salary-Chief 


00 


81.849 08 


81.849 08 


0.00 


00 


000 


Police 


Sal.-Dep Chief 


000 


64.975 42 


64.975 42 


0.00 


00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal-Lieut 


000 


113.426 43 


113.426 43 


000 


000 


00 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


283,473.08 


283,473.08 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 







AMT CFWD T 


TRANSFERS 






AMT CFWD TO 








FY 99 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 




FY 00 FROM 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1998 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


Police 


Sal.-Patrolmen 


00 


1.210,685 00 


1,173.044 49 


37,64051 


00 


37,640 51 


Police 


Sal-Clencal 


0.00 


62,944 96 


62,944 96 


0.00 


000 


000 


Police 


Sal -Dispatchers 


0.00 


25,765 00 


24,81292 


95208 


000 


952 08 


Police 


Sal -Fill In Costs 


0.00 


263,673 86 


263,673 86 


00 


000 


000 


Police 


Sal,-Pd Holidays 


0.00 


77,077 00 


75,079 21 


1,997.79 


00 


1,997.79 


Police 


Sal -Speaalist 


0.00 


10.700 00 


10.700 00 


0.00 


000 


000 


Police 


Sal.-lncentive 


0.00 


168,445 88 


168,445 88 


000 


00 


000 


Police 


Sal.-Night Diff 


0.00 


32,760.00 


28,41300 


4,347.00 


000 


4,347 00 


Police 


Expenses 


0.00 


163,430,00 


163,071,86 


358 14 


358 14 


00 


Police 


Furnish & Equip 


15,027 00 


00 


15,027 00 


000 


00 


00 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


000 


14,264 00 


12,77848 


1,485 52 


00 


1.485 52 






15,027 00 


2.573,469 71 


2.541,715 67 


46,781 04 


358 14 


48,422 90 


Fire Dept. 


Sal -Chief 


0.00 


79.714 10 


79,714 10 


000 


00 


00 


Fire Dept 


Sal -Dep Chief 


0.00 


91,231 20 


91,231 20 


00 


000 


00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal-Lieut 


0.00 


263,869 00 


260,533 32 


3,335 68 


000 


3,335 68 


Fire Dept. 


Sal-Pnvates 


0.00 


1.142,992 00 


1.140,233 61 


2,758 39 


000 


2.75839 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


62.101.32 


62,101 32 


0.00 


000 


OOO 


Fire Dept. 


Sal -Pari Time 


00 


7.350 00 


6,321 00 


1,029 00 


000 


1 ,029 00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal -Overtime Costs 


00 


234,498 34 


234,498 34 


00 


000 


000 


Fire Dept. 


Sal -Pd Holidays 


0.00 


84,263 00 


83,35295 


91005 


00 


910 05 


Fire Dept. 


1 Ann*.. .f^ICk FT 

Sal.-lncentive/hMi 


0.00 


l^.DZO.OU 


12,6^0 00 


0.00 


00 


00 


Fire Dept 


Sal.-OT.FIre Alarm 


0.00 


13,500.00 


13,500 00 


0.00 


000 


000 


Fire Dept 


Expenses 


000 


78,000 00 


77,004 95 


995.05 


850 74 


144 31 


Fire Dept. 


Sick Leave Buyback 


000 


20,211 00 


18,99774 


1,213 26 


00 


1,213 26 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip 


20,908.45 


33,800 00 


32,97278 


21,735 67 


21,735 67 


000 






20,908.45 


2,124,154 96 


2.1 13.086 31 


31,977.10 


22 586 41 




Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


24,81484 


24.81484 


000 


000 


000 


Animal Control 


Cont. Services 


000 


5,000 00 


2,184 01 


2,815 99 


000 


2,81599 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


000 


600 00 


000 


60C00 


00 


600 00 






00 


•^n 414 84 






00 


4 1 *^ qq 


Prot. Persons & Prop. Subtotal 


QQC AC. 
OD.yjO HO 




A ecu Qnn 0*3 
4,001 ,oUU oo 


DO 17/1 1 Q 




CO oon CQ 
by, 2^3 00 


PUBLIC WORKS: 
















Englneenng Div 


Salanes 


0.00 


129,454 00 


126.399 67 


3.054 33 


00 


3,054 33 


Engineenng Div 


Salanes-Part Time 


00 


39,900 00 


39,900 00 


000 


000 


000 


Engineenng Div 


Expenses 


19 55 


3,500 00 


2,743 80 


775,75 


000 


775 75 






19 55 


172,854 00 


169,04347 


3,830 08 


000 


3.830 08 


Highway Division 


Sal-D.P W Supt 


0.00 


68,452 47 


68,452 47 


00 


00 


000 


Higtiway Division 


Salanes-Other 


0.00 


982,413 55 


982,41355 


000 


00 


000 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint Sal. 


ooo 


15,200 00 


11,441 50 


3,75850 


00 


3,758 50 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint Exp. 


00 


1,000 00 


331 77 


668 23 


00 


668 23 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


8,877 91 


173.890 00 


168.197 24 


14,570.67 


0,00 


14,570 67 


Highway Division 


Rd Mach Exp 


3,75659 


60,000.00 


49.344 06 


14,41253 


000 


14,412 53 


Highway Division 


Fuel & Other 


18,281 03 


124,130 00 


116.909 64 


25,501 39 


000 


25,501.39 


Highway Division 


Drainage Projects 


000 


20,000 00 


17.31067 


2,689 33 


000 


2,689.33 


Highway Division 


Public St Lights 


142.50 


207,97600 


205.650 38 


2,468 12 


000 


2,468 12 


Highway Division 


Chapter 8 1M 


79,188 92 


(671 59) 


78.517 33 


00 


00 


000 


Highway Division 


Furnish & Equip 


000 


24,300 00 


22.150 17 


2,149 83 


00 


2,149 83 






110.246.95 


1.676,690 43 


1,720.71878 


66,21860 


00 


66.21860 


Snow & Ice Control 


Salanes 


000 


115,51400 


112.577 89 


2,936 11 


00 


2,936 11 


Snow & Ice Control 


Expenses 


12,745 81 


167,957 00 


172.672 25 


8,030 56 


000 


8,030 56 






12,745 81 


283,471 00 


285.250 14 


10,966 67 


00 


10,966 67 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


241,275 55 


1.775,000 00 


1,439,126 24 


577,149 31 


577.149 31 


000 






241,275 55 


1.775,000 00 


1,439.126 24 


577,149 31 


577,149 31 


000 



-33 - 



,- • • »- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 



AMTCFWDT TRANSFERS 



AMI CFWD TO 



Tree Division 
Tree Division 



Salanes 
Expenses 



Parks & Grounds Div Salanes 
Parks & Grounds Div Expenses 



Cemetery Division 
Cemetery Division 



Salanes 
Expenses 



Public Works Subtotal 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT; 

Board of Health Salary-Director 
Board of Healtfi Salanes-Oltier 
Board of Healtfi Expenses 
Board of Healtfi Mental Health 



Sealer/Wght & Wisas Salanes 
Sealer/Wght & Meas Expenses 



Planning/Conservation Salary-Director 

Planning/Conservation Salanes-Other 

Planning/Conservation Expenses 

Planning/Conservation Furnish & Equip 



BIdg Inspector 
BIdg Inspector 
BIdg Inspector 



Sal-Bldg Inspector 

Salanes-Other 

Expenses 



Community Development Subtotal 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS; 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 
Public Buildings 



Sal-Supenntendent 
Salanes-Other 
Fuel Heating 
Electnc-Town BIdgs 
Utilities-Town BIdgs 
Expenses-Town BIdgs 
Expenses-School BIdgs 
Furn & Equip. 
Asbestos Repair 
Roof Repairs 
HVAC Repairs 



Public Buildings Subtotal 
HUMAN SERVICES; 



Veterans 
Veterans 
Veterans 



Salary 

Expenses 

Assistance 



FY 99 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 




FY 00 FROM 


CLOSING 


CIQPAr 1QQR 


PI<5r*AI 1QQQ 


rlOV-»Ml_ 1333 


RAI ANCF 


FISCAI 1999 


RAI ANTF 


00 


109 266 35 


109,266 36 


00 


00 


00 


00 


9,395 00 


6,564 10 


2,830 90 


00 


2,830 90 


00 


118.661 36 


115,830 46 


2,830 90 


000 


2,830 90 


00 


169,907 18 


169,907 18 


00 


000 


00 


00 


30,400 00 


29,983 36 


416 64 


00 


416 64 


00 




1 qq oqn <\i 


416 64 


00 


416 64 


0.00 


116,993 62 


116.993 62 


00 


0.00 


0.00 


000 


25.750 00 


17,603 83 


8,146 17 


00 


8.146 17 


00 


M7 7/13 67 


134 5<37 45 


8 146 17 


00 


8 146 17 


OCA 007 QC 


A "^fiQ 707 *>Q 
*4,oD3, / // 3j 




UU3,JU0 0/ 




3/;.'*U3,uD 


U OU 


CC /ICO CO 


C^C, AC^ CO 


n nn 

U UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 
U UU 


U UU 


1 1 y,3i:^ / ^ 


1 1 1 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


n nn 
U UU 


U UU 


7 c;Qn nn 

/ ,Dyu UU 


c C07 CC 
0,00/ DO 


1 nno 


Qnn nn 
yuu UU 


1 m QC 
lUz OD 


00 


21,160 00 


19,396 63 


1,763 37 


1.763 33 


0.04 


00 


203,725 32 


200,959 60 


2.765 72 


2.663.33 


102 39 


0.00 


4.200 00 


4,200 00 


00 


0.00 


00 


00 


80 00 


80 00 


00 


0.00 


00 


000 


4,280 00 


4,280 00 


00 


000 


000 


00 


58,195 19 


58,195 19 


000 


00 


00 


00 


104,935 08 


104,935 08 


00 


00 


000 


1.650 00 


11,400 00 


5,027 21 


8,022 79 


7,689 95 


332 84 


0.00 


200 00 


200 00 


00 


000 


0.00 



1,650.00 


174.73027 


168,357 48 


8,022 79 


7.689 95 


33284 


000 


48,368 54 


48.368 54 


00 


000 


00 


00 


66,93883 


66,938 83 


00 


0.00 


00 


1,500 00 


5,235 00 


5,020 12 


1,714 88 


231 54 


1,483 34 


1.500 00 


120,542 37 


120,327 49 


1,71488 


231 54 


1,483 34 


3.150 00 


503,277 96 


493,924 57 


12.503 39 


10,584 82 


1,91857 


00 


78.699 33 


78,699 33 


00 


00 


00 


00 


1.492.820 36 


1,492,820 36 


00 


00 


0.00 


000 


226,600 00 


224.559 58 


2,040 42 


2,04042 


0.00 


4,905 94 


96,000 00 


77.705 13 


23,200 81 


0.00 


23,200 81 


00 


66,000 00 


63.000 79 


2,999 21 


000 


2,999 21 


28 85 


67.550 00 


66,907 86 


67099 


670 99 


00 


00 


133.185 00 


133.185 00 


00 


000 


00 


00 


400 00 


400.00 


00 


00 


00 


103 30 


4,000 00 


4,103 30 


00 


00 


00 


1.293 54 


9,200 00 


3,943 21 


6,550 33 


6,550 33 


00 


5,713 47 


40,000 00 


42,757 83 


2,955 64 


2,955 64 


00 


12.045 10 


2 214,454 69 


2,188,082 39 


38,41740 


12,217 38 


26.200 02 


12.045 10 


2.214,454 69 


2,188,082 39 


38,417 40 


12,21738 


26.20002 


00 


6.203 96 


6,203 96 


00 


00 


00 


00 


1.750 00 


1,745 02 


4 98 


00 


498 


00 


13,000 00 


10,463 50 


2,536 50 


00 


2.536 50 


00 


20.953 96 


18.41248 


2,541 48 


00 


2,541 48 




-34- 











TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 







AMT CFWD T 


TRANSFERS 






AMT CFWD TO 








FY 99 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 




FY 00 FROM 


CLOSING 






FISCAL 1998 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 1999 


BAUNCE 


Library 


Salary-Director 


000 


45.050 70 


45.050 70 


000 


00 


000 


Library 


Salanes-Other 


000 


342,939 59 


342.939 59 


000 


000 


000 


Library 


Expenses 


320.00 


100, DID 00 


iuo,yjD 00 


00 


00 


000 


Library 


Furn & Equip. 


1.563 00 


15,915 00 


17.457 66 


20 34 


00 


20 34 






1,883 00 


504.521 29 


506,383 95 


20 34 


00 


20 34 


Reaeatlon 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


60,161 29 


60.161 29 


0.00 


000 


000 


Reaeation 


Salanes-Other 


0.00 


39,818 52 


39.818 52 


00 


00 


000 


Recreation 


Expenses 


u.uu 


z,oUU UU 


1 7CA 




00 


39 62 


Recreation 


Furn & Equip. 


0.00 


250 00 


227 50 


22 50 


000 


22 50 






00 


103,029 81 


102,967 69 


6212 


00 


62 12 


Elderly Services 


oaldi y-lyil cuiui 


0.00 


36 861 55 


3S 861 55 


00 


00 


00 


PIHortu ^or\yirp'^ 
ClUciiy ociviuco 


Salanes-Other 


000 


54,23687 


54.236 87 


00 


00 


000 


Elderly Services 


Expenses 


000 


34,40341 


34,403 41 


000 


00 


000 






000 


125,501 83 


125,501 83 


00 


000 


000 


Historical Comm 


Salaries 


0.00 


918 00 


91800 


00 


000 


000 


Histoncal Comm 


Expenses 


2,721 34 


4,650 00 


1.555 01 


5,816 33 


5,81633 


000 






2.721 34 


5,568 00 


2,47301 


5,81633 


5,816 33 


000 


Handcapped Coinm 


Salaries 


000 


500 00 


264 00 


236 00 


000 


236 00 


Handicapped Comm 


Expenses 


000 


250 00 


193 25 


56 75 


000 


56 75 






000 


750 00 


457 25 


29275 


000 


292 75 


Huntian Services Subtotal 


4.604 34 


760,324 89 


756,196 21 


8.733 02 


5.81633 


2,91669 


EDUCATION: 
















School Dept 


Salanes 


000 


13,875,500 00 


14,015.239 22 


(139,739 22) 


(139,739 22) 


(0 00) 


School Dept 


Expenses 


292,301 51 


3,388,295 00 


3,376.147 39 


304,449 12 


304,449.12 


000 






£n7^,OU 1.3 1 




17 ■^Ql "^ftfi fil 
1 t ,Oj t ,ooo O 1 


1 fi4 7nQ on 




\\J.\AJ) 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


00 


1,941.454 00 


1,941,454 00 


00 


00 


000 






00 


1.941,454 00 


1,941,454.00 


000 


000 


000 


Education Subtotal 




292,301 51 


19,205.249 00 


19,332,840.61 


164.709 90 


164.709 90 


(0 00) 


DEBT SERVICE: 
















Debt & Interest 


Schools 


0.00 


104,419 00 


104,41875 


25 


000 


25 


Debt & Interest 


Gen Government 


0.00 


375,23300 


375.232 50 


50 


000 


050 


Debt & Interest 


Sewer 


0.00 


108,201 00 


108,201 00 


000 


000 


000 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


0.00 


169,831 00 


169,831 00 


00 


000 


000 


Debt & Interest 


Auth Fees & Misc 


000 


117,500 00 


87,131 50 


30 368 50 


16,000 00 


14,368 50 






00 


875 1 84 00 


844,814 75 


30,369 25 


16,000 00 


14,369 25 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 


0.00 


0/0, 1o4 UU 


QAA Q4 A 7C 




1 C AAA AA 


1 A QCQ OC 


UNCUSSIFIED: 
















Veterans' Retirement 




0.00 


20,400 00 


16,80262 


3,597 38 


000 


3.597 38 


Employ Retire Unused Sick Leave 


0.00 


23,100 00 


357 50 


22,742.50 


000 


22,742 50 


Medicare Employers' Contnbution 


0.00 


182,257 20 


182,257 20 


000 


000 


000 


Salary At^ & Add Costs 


0.00 


36,347 05 


15,029 41 


21,31764 


00 


21,31764 


Local Trans/Training Conf 


0.00 


7.500 00 


2,167 91 


5.33209 


000 


5,33209 


Out of State Travel 




0.00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


000 


000 


0.00 


Computer Hardware & Software 














fvlaint & Expenses 




14,572 98 


110,000 00 


109,731 75 


14,841 23 


14,841 23 


000 


Microfilm Projects 




3,000 00 


1.000 00 


000 


4 000 00 


4,000 00 


000 


Annual Audit 




0.00 


13,900 00 


13,900 00 


000 


000 


000 


Ambulance Billing 




0.00 


12,000 00 


9,325 00 


2,675 00 


000 


2,67500 


Town Report 




0.00 


7,000 00 


5,11250 


1,887 50 


000 


1,887 50 


Sewer Maintenance 




51,161 98 


58,150 00 


38,781 67 


70.530 31 


70,530 31 


000 


Professional & Tech Services 


12,962.93 


20.000 00 


6.346 14 


26.61679 


26,61679 


000 



-35- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1999 





AMT CFWD T 


TRANSFER & 






AMT CFWD TO 






FY 99 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 




FY 00 FROM 


CLOSING 




FISCAL 1998 


FISCAL 1999 


FISCAL 19?9 


BALANCE 


FISCAL 1999 


BALANCE 


Delerred Teachers Salanes 


0,00 


106,527 00 


00 


106,527 00 


000 


106.527 00 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


100,000 00 


00 


100,000 00 


00 


100,000 00 


Insurance & Bonds 


61,069 50 


338,230 00 


261,796 17 


137,503 33 


69,850 00 


67,65333 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 


163,476 28 


2,811.430 27 


2,733,090 35 


241,81620 


241,81620 


(0 00) 


Unclassified Subtotal 


306,243 67 


3,848,841 52 


3,395,698 22 


759,386 97 


427,654 53 


331.732 44 


STATUTORY CHARGES; 














Amt. Cerl Coll Tax Title 


00 


20,000 00 


18,113 17 


1,886 83 


000 


1,886 83 


Cun-ent Year Overlay 


00 


675,000 00 


00 


675,000 00 


00 


675,000 00 


Retlrennent Contnbutions 


00 


1,225,226 00 


1,298,634 00 


(73,408 00) 


00 


(73,408 00) 


County Retlrennent Tax 


0.00 


44,868 00 


44,868 00 


00 


00 


00 


Offset Itenns 


0.00 


36,293 00 


0,00 


36,29300 


00 


36,293 00 


Special Education 


0.00 


541,00 


5,786 00 


(5.245.00) 


00 


(5,245 00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth 


0.00 


419,967 00 


419,948 00 


19.00 


00 


19 00 


MAPC (Ch 688 of 1963) 


0.00 


4,713 00 


4,763 00 


(50 00) 


000 


(50 00) 


ExaseTax{Ch 727 of 1962) 


0.00 


11,547 00 


12,360,00 


(813 00) 


000 


(813 00) 


Metro Air Poll Cont Dist 


0.00 


5,647 00 


5,563 00 


84 00 


00 


84 00 


Mosquito Control Program 


000 


28,901 00 


28,203,00 


698,00 


00 


698.00 


M W.RA Sewer Assessment 


000 


1,405,985 00 


1,487.428,00 


(81,443 00) 


00 


(81,443 00) 


Charier Schools 


00 


0.00 


2,250 00 


(2,250 00) 


00 


(2,250,00) 


Cnminal Justice Training 
Statutory Charges Subtotal 


0,00 


5.400 00 


3,600 00 


1 ,800 00 


00 


1,800 00 


00 


3,884.088.00 


3,331,516 17 


552,571 83 


00 


552,571 83 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 














Police Dept Cruisers 


00 


105,915,00 


105,915,00 


00 


000 


000 


Police Dept Mobile Data System 


0,00 


90,500 00 


23,467 15 


67,032 85 


67,032 85 


000 


Fire Dept. Ambulance 


0.00 


130,000 00 


129,333 30 


666 70 


00 


66670 


Fire Dept, Rescue Boat 


0.00 


10,000 00 


8,235 00 


1,765,00 


00 


1,765 00 


Public Works Parks & Grounds 


0.00 


13,000 00 


11,055 18 


1,944,82 


00 


1,944 82 


Public Buildings Histoncal Renovations 


00 


13,000,00 


7,339 14 


5,660 86 


5,660 86 


000 


Public Buildings Trucks 


00 


20,055,00 


20,055 00 


00 


00 


000 


Public Buildings Carpet/Floonng 


00 


35,23200 


35,232,00 


00 


00 


00 


Public Buildings ADA Compliance 


8,486 07 


000 


3,87999 


4,606 08 


4,606 08 


00 


Public Buildings West Schoolhouse 


3.191 18 


000 


423 26 


2,767 92 


2,767 92 


000 


School Dept Woburn St Roof RepI 


7,185 00 


000 


00 


7,185 00 


7,185 00 


0,00 


School Dept Fire Alarm Upgrade 


38,758 06 


000 


3,748,89 


35,009 17 


35,009 17 


00 


School Dept Minivan 


000 


56,518,00 


56,518,00 


00 


000 


0.00 


School Dept Burner/Boiler Replace 


0.00 


75,000 00 


69,564 61 


5,435 39 


5,435 39 


000 


School Dept Roof Repairs 


0.00 


67,650 00 


66,675 00 


975,00 


00 


975.00 


School Dept Window Replacement 


000 


30,800 00 


25,081 12 


5,718 88 


5,718 88 


0.00 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


57,620.31 


647,670 00 


566,522 64 


138,767 67 


133,416 15 


5,351 52 


WARRANT ARTICLES; 














Memonal DayA/eterans Day 


0.00 


5,000.00 


1.87522 


3,124 78 


00 


3,124 78 


Lease Quarters-Mannes.VFW. Legion 


000 


2,250 00 


2,250 00 


00 


00 


00 


Environmental Impact Study 


44,124 88 


00 


44,124 88 


00 


00 


00 


Sewer Master Plan 


35,000 00 


0.00 


5,01598 


29,984 02 


29,984 02 


000 


Master Plan Study 


30.000 00 


0.00 


00 


30,000 00 


30,000 00 


00 


Street Acceptance 


000 


300 00 


223 32 


76 68 


00 


7668 


Senior Tax Rebate Program 


5,897 50 


10,000 00 


6,000 00 


9,897 50 


9,897 50 


0.00 


Land Purchase 


0.00 


432,400 00 


140,000 00 


292,400 00 


292.400 00 


000 


Warrant Articles Subtotal 


115,022 38 


449,950 00 


199,489 40 


365,482 98 


362,281 52 


3,201 46 


TOTAL 


1,229.935.82 


42,713,751 27 


41,084,141 86 


2,859,545 23 


1.762,806 13 


1,096,739 10 



-36- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 



ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL 



REVENUES: 


1997 


1998 


1999 


WATER RECEIVABLES RATES 


2,837,206.10 


2,678,239.24 


2,663,092.70 


WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 


15,382.35 


14,168.30 


18,923.31 


WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 


34,577.50 


11,556.95 


26,911.56 


WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 


91,302.00 


81,777.10 


83,147.50 


WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT. 


37,194.60 


38,655.38 


40,870.53 


WATER RECEIVABLES CROSS CONN 


24,835.00 


22 575 00 


28 175 00 

1 / \J .\J\J 


WATER LIENS 


104,422.01 


132,336.53 


122,129.99 


SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 


1,949.47 


1,630.54 


4,205.34 


MISCELLANEOUS 


28,654.15 


16,763.56 


25,873.96 


RFIMRIIR'^FMFNTS 


n nn 






TOTAL REVENUE: 


3,175,523.18 


3,050,364.88 


3,016,329.89 


OPERATING COSTS 


1,624,124.40 


1,701,815.59 


2,091,832.00 


TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 


1,624,124.40 


1,701,815.59 


2,091,832.00 


EXCESS REVENUES OVER OPERATING COSTS 


1,551,398.78 


1,348,549.29 


924,497.89 


TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 








DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 








AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 


1,234,668.00 


650,693.00 


456,552.00 


EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 








TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 


316,730.78 


697,856.29 


467,945.89 


TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 


919,332.57 


1,236,063.35 


1,933,919.64 


TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 


1,236,063.35 


1,933,919.64 


2,401,865.53 




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TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1999 





YEAR 


YEAR 




PRINCIPAL OUTSTANDING 


BOND 


BOND 


OUTSTANDING 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


AMOUNT 


JUNE 30, 1998 ADDITIONS RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30, 1999 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Street Bonds 


11-90 


11-98 


6.8-6.85 


110,000 


10,000 





10,000 





Remodeling 


11-90 


11-98 


6.85 


420,000 


50,000 





50,000 





Sewer - Main Street 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-6.85 


745,000 


220,000 





75,000 


145,000 


School Boilers 


11-90 


11-99 


6.8-6.85 


852,500 


185,000 





95,000 


90,000 


Sewer-MWRA Loan 


06-95 


05-00 





138,000 


41,400 





20,700 


20,700 


Dept. Equipment-Fire 


06-95 


06-00 


5 


230,000 


90,000 





45,000 


45,000 


Judgennent Loan Act 


08-96 


08-02 


4.9 


1,125,000 


900,000 





225,000 


675,000 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 






3,620,500 


1,496,400 





520,700 


975,700 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Water Standpipe 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-8.85 


1,425,000 


435,000 





145,000 


290,000 


TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 






1,425,000 


435,000 





145,000 


290,000 


TOTAL DEBT 








5,045,500 


1,931,400 





665,700 


1,265,700 



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-40- 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Department 



It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the 
operations, activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department 
for the year 1999. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five lieutenants, twenty - 
eight fire fighters and two civilian dispatchers. George Anderson, III was 
appointed to the force this year. 

The following roster is provided: 

Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 



John Brown, Jr. 
Joseph T. McMahon 



Lieutenants 



Paul Welch 



Edmund J. Corcoran, III 
Christopher J. Nee 



Robert J, 
Brian D. 
George A. 
George A. 
David J. 
Walter R, 



Andersen 
Anderson 

Anderson, 

Anderson, 
Currier 

Daley 



Gary J. Donovan 
George J. Driscoll 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 



Fire Fighters 

Kenneth P . Gray 
Richard J. Hughes 

Jr. Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 

Ill Andrew W. Leverone 

Richard T. McClellan 
John F . McDonough 
Terry L . McKenna 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Christopher G. Pozzi 



Stephen D. Robbins 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Frederick J. Ryan 
Daniel J. 
Charles R 
Robert W. 
Robert E . 
David P 



Stygles 

Taylor, Jr. 
Varey, Jr. 
Vassallo, Jr. 
Woods 



Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatchers 



Linda K. Abbott 



Thomas W. Ceres 




Fire Fighter Robert Woods discusses fire fighting with a young resident 
during the 4th of July festivities. 



-41- 



The department responded to a total of 2,472 calls during 1999. 



Residential Buildings 
Residential (Other) 
Commercial Structures 
Commercial (Other) 
Haz Mat (out of Town) 
Chimney, Fireplaces & 

Woodburning Stoves 
Vehicles 

Brush, Grass or Rubbish 
Dumpsters 



9 
5 

3 



54 
27 

7 



False Alarms 

Ambulance /Res cues 

Service Calls 

Carbon Monoxide Detectors 



Out of Town Assistance 
Fire 

Ambu 1 ance / Re s cue 



310 
1,506 
358 
27 



134 
65 
69 



Estimated value of property endangered was $4,840,400. 
$166, 600 . 



Estimated property loss 



The following is a list of permits issued: 



Black Powder 
Blasting 

Class C Explosive 
Fire Alarm 
Flammable Liquid 
Oil Burner 
Subpoena 
Welding 



3 


Propane 


44 


15 


Report 


33 





Smoke Detector 


234 


68 


Tank 


52 


10 


Miscellaneous 





91 


Sprinkler 


51 





Truck 





3 


Gas Stations 







TOTAL 


604 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, nursing homes 
and flammable storage facilities were inspected by the Fire Prevention Bureau 
under the direction of Lieutenant Joseph McMahon and Lieutenant Christopher 
Nee. Other inspections listed below: 



New Residential Plans Review 

New Residential Fire Inspections 

New Industrial Plans Review 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 

Underground Tank Removals 

Underground Tank Installations 

Oil Burner 

Propane 



120 
120 
25 
60 
40 
3 
44 
20 



Shift personnel inspected 234 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with M.G.L. Chapter 148, Section 26F. 



School classroom Grades K-5 were visited by fire fighters and various safety 
issues were discussed. Fire Fighter Robert Patrie instructed fire prevention 
at the Abundant Life School. Lieutenant Joseph McMahon continued to teach the 
Safe Grant Program of Fire Safety Education in the elementary and middle 
schools. Michael Johnson, eighth grade student of the West Intermediate 
School, was credited with rescuing his family from a house fire utilizing 
knowledge learned in the program. 



-42- 



The Municipal Fire Alarm Division under the direction of Lieutenant Edmund 
Corcoran and Fire Fighter David Feyler has been involved in two on-going 
construction projects. The new middle school project required the installation 
of 1,000' of figure 8 aerial wire and new drops to the Boutwell and West 
Intermediate Schools. 

The Route 62 bridge construction project had 1,500' of figure 8 wire installed 
with many pole changeovers on Main Street and Burlington Avenue. The new 
public safety building has also required countless hours of design and planning 
for the dispatch center. 

The following master boxes were added to the system in 1999: 

3422 DeCenso Properties, 1 Progress Way 

3151 Kirkwood Publications, 904 Main Street 

3311 NER Construction, 867 Woburn Street 

Many master boxes were relocated on industrial buildings due to construction 
and renovation projects. 

Lieutenant Corcoran and Fire Fighter Feyler attended Fire Alarm Certification 
Training . 

The Massachusetts fire service community experienced it's worst tragedy in over 
twenty years as six Worcester fire fighters were killed in the line of duty at 
a warehouse fire in December. The Wilmington Fire Department provided 
assistance to the City of Worcester in many areas including fire suppression, 
hazardous materials, critical incident stress management, command post and 
honor guard. 

Construction of the new public safety building has begun with completion 
scheduled for the fall of 2000. 

Departmental goals remain the construction and occupancy of the public safety 
building and planning for a sub-station in North Wilmington. Fire Department 
and dispatching staffing is expected to increase to accommodate the rapid 
growth in town. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant 
Town Manager, department heads and staff, the Board of Selectmen and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. 




/•//■(' ami Police personnel respond to an emergency. 



-43- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year of 1999. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 1999; and, for the most 
part the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police 
Department. During 1999 the total number of complaints and incidents 
reported to the police department decreased by 530 from 20,490 incidents in 
1998 to 19,879 during 1999. For the most part, these decreases were in 
miscellaneous complaints. Cruisers were dispatched to 12,002 complaints and 
calls for services during 1999, a decrease of 541 from the dispatches for 
1998. Several of the serious crime categories increased during 1999. 
Breaking and entering into homes and buildings increased by 9% from 63 
incidents in 1998 to 69 during 1999. This follows a 22% decrease in 1998. 
The number of armed robberies increased from three during 1998 to eight 
during 1999. Totals for assaults and batteries decreased from 59 in 1998 to 
54 in 1999. Motor vehicles stolen in Wilmington decreased by 26% from 35 in 

1998 to 26 in 1999. This follows significant decreases over the past several 
years and the number of motor vehicles stolen in 1999 is the lowest rate of 
the past twenty years . 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be serious 
community problems. During 1999 the police department experienced a 5% 
decrease in the motor vehicle accident rate. Motor vehicle accidents 
decreased by 40 accidents from 812 accidents in 1998 to 772 during 1999. The 
police department has for several years placed a high priority on the 
enforcement of motor vehicle violations. During 1999 the department cited 
4,747 motor vehicle violations. The following are the totals for some of the 
major areas of concern, speeding violations 1,649, operators license 
violations 239, unregistered and uninsured 97, and miscellaneous violations 
1,792. Arrests for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol 
decreased by six from 89 in 1998 to 83 in 1999. 

Arrests for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 1999 totaled 430, 
a decrease of 67 from 1998. The police department continues to place a high 
priority on alcohol and drug related offenses. During 1999 arrests for 
liquor law violations decreased by three from 16 in 1998 to 13 in 1999; and, 
there were a total of 29 narcotics arrests made during 1999. In addition to 
motor vehicle and other criminal arrests, the department placed a total of 
193 persons under protective custody. A total of 706 persons were taken into 
custody by the police department during 1999. 

In closing the statistical report for 1999, it is interesting to note that 
the end of the millennium was projected to be a volatile period, however, 

1999 was very much a typical year. Overall, crimes and complaints decreased 
in 1999, and the potential problems related to Y2K did not occur. The 2000 
New Year's eve was one of the least eventful of recent years. 

In 1999 the department completed it fifth full year of the implementation of 
the community policing philosophy. While this is a long-term process and 
requires significant changes in attitudes and expectation by both the police 
officers and the community, we have made substantial progress. During 1999 
the neighborhood officers responded and followed-up on several hundred 



-44- 



problem solving assignments in their neighborhoods. In many of these cases 
they were effective in eliminating the problems, and in doing so they have 
significantly reduced the number of repeat calls for those problem. In 1999 
the department increased the deployment of the officers into the neighbor- 
hoods, not only on problem solving assignments, but also at block parties or 
other neighborhood social events, in an effort to ensure that every resident 
has an opportunity to meet with their neighborhood officer. During 1999 all 
officers received additional training in problem solving techniques, the use 
of bicycle patrols for special events and the use of directed enforcement 
efforts to address chronic problems. In 1999 the department deployed bicycle 
patrols during the Fourth of July activities and throughout the summer in the 
Silver Lake area on weekends and holidays. The department believes that 
these patrols were very effective in reducing habitual problems in this area, 
and has received numerous positive comments from residents. During December 
1999, the department opened a community policing storefront for the holiday 
season at Wilmington Plaza on Main Street. The department received numerous 
positive comments from residents, and from the area merchants, regarding the 
effect of the storefront. The department greatly appreciated the 
participation of each of the business in the Plaza, and owes a special thanks 
to the T.J. Maxx store, which provided the accommodations for the 
neighborhood officers. 

In 2000 the department will continue and expand our proactive involvement in 
each of the neighborhoods. The department will be conducting another 
Citizens Police Academy where residents will be provided insight into how the 
Police Department operates a department policy and procedures in areas of 
interest such as use of force, motor vehicle pursuits, citizen complaints and 
the elements of crimes which must exist before an arrest or prosecution is 
made. Residents will also be provided information regarding the Police 
Department's goals and objectives. As part of our planning for the future, 
the Police Department, working closely with the community, will review the 
role of the professional police officer in today's society and will review 
the types of incidents which require a priority response and those which 
should be referred to the neighborhood officer and how the available 
resources of the department can be more effectively used to address the 
future problems of the community. 




Officers Patrick King and David Siigrue — 4lli of July 1999. 



-45- 



The following is a Departmental Roster of the Neighborhood Officers and their 
assignments . 



Wilmington Police Department 
Community Policing 
Neighborhood Assignments 

Supervisor Area 1 Sergeant James Rooney 



lA. Officer John Tully 
IC. Officer Paul Chalifour 



IB. Officer David Bradbury 
ID. Officer Charles Fiore 



Supervisor Area 2 Sergeant J. Christopher Neville 



2A. 
2C. 
2E. 



Officer 
Officer 
Officer 



Paul Krzeminski 
Julie Lambert 
Patrick Nally 



2B. Officer David Axelrod 
2D. Officer Francis Hancock 



Supervisor Area 3 Sergeant Michael Begonis 



3A. Officer Scott Sencabaugh 
3C. Officer David McCue, Jr. 



3B. Officer Stephen Mauriello 
3D. Officer Thomas McConologue 



Supervisor Area 4 Sergeant Robert Richter 



4A. Officer Paul Jepson 

4C. Officer Louis Martignetti 



4B. Officer Brian Moon 
4D. Officer Brian Pupa 



Supervisor Area 5 Sergeant Joseph Desmond 



5A. 
5C. 



Officer 
Officer 



Ronald Alpers 
Anthony Fiore 



5B. Officer Steven LaRivee 
5D. Officer Jon Shepard 



Business and Commercial Areas 
Lieutenant Robert Spencer 



Area 1 
Area 3 
Area 5 



Det. Thomas Miller 
Det . Patrick King 
Det . John Bossi 



Area 2 : Det . David Sugrue 

Area 4 : Det . James White 



Other members of the department include Deputy Chief Bernard Nally, Sergeant 
William Gable, Sergeant David McCue, Patrolmen Chester Bruce, Richard 
DiPerri, Brian Gillis, Joseph Harris, James Peterson, Lawrence Redding and 
Robert Shelley; Police Clerk/Matrons Beth Lessard and Dawn Ganno; and 
Dispatchers April Kingston, Charleen LaRivee and George O'Connell. 

In October 1999, construction began on the new public safety building which 
is scheduled to be completed by the end of November 2000. The new facility 
will accommodate the Police and Fire Department and a combined Public Safety 
Dispatch . 



The department makes note of personnel changes during 1999. During 1999 two 
patrolmen were hired to fill department vacancies. These new officers are 
Patrolman Richard DiPerri and Patrolman Michael Wandell. 



-46- 



In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all boards and committees and all department heads and employees 
for their support and cooperation during 1999. 

A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. 




Police Honor Guard marching in the Memorial Day Parade — left to right: Officers Thomas A. Miller and Jon C. 
Shcpard. Sergeants J. Christopher Neville, Michael R. Begonis. Joseph A. Desmond and Lieutenant Robert V. Richter. 



-47- 




Wilmington Police Department Statistics 1999 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 



Ages : 



ARRESTS : 




SEX CRIMES : 




Arson 


U 


Rape 


8 


Assault Sc. Battery 




Indecent Exposure 


7 


Breaking & Entering 


Q 
O 


Indecent A&B 


6 


Disorderly 


7 


Other 


1 


Gambling 


u 


iUlAL bbA CKiMbb : 


22 


Larceny 


8 






Larceny Motor Vehicle 


1 


MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS : 




Liquor Laws 


13 


Seat Belt 


863 


Malicious Damage 


ft 


ubxily I'vxLriouc ^iucnoricy 


u 


Murder 





License Violations 


239 


Narcotics 


29 


Endangering 


13 


Non Support 





Leaving Scene Property Damage 


11 


Rape 


3 


Operating Under Influence 


83 


Receiving Stolen Property 





Unregistered/Uninsured 


97 


Robbery 


5 


Speed 


1, 649 


Sex Offenses 


5 


Other 


1, 792 


Juvenile 


1 


TOTAL VIOLATIONS : 


4,747 


Other 


307 






TOTAL : 


430 


CITATIONS ISSUED: 





Warnings 
Complaints 
Non-Criminal 
Arrests 



1,531 
94 
1, 381 
154 



11/12 





TOTAL CITATIONS : 


3 , 160 


13/14 


4 






15 


6 


CRIMES REPORTED: 




16 


9 


Threats of Arson & Bombing 


66 


17 


16 


Assault & Battery: 




TOTAL UNDER 1 8 : 


34 


Firearm 


1 






Knife 


2 


18 


24 


Other Weapon 


8 


19 


17 


Aggravated-hand- foot 


23 


20 


2 


No Weapon 





21 


3 


Simple Assault 


20 


22 


8 


TOTAL ASSAULTS 


54 


23 


3 






24 


3 


BREAKING & ENTERING: 




25/29 


17 


By Force 


46 


30/34 


20 


No Force 


9 


35/39 


22 


Attempted 


14 


40/44 


16 


TOTAL B&E: 


69 


45/49 


16 






50/54 


2 


ROBBERY: 




55/59 


4 


Firearm 


4 


60 & Over 


2 


Other Weapon 


1 


TOTAL OVER 18 : 


159 


Strong Arm 


3 






TOTAL ROBBERIES : 


8 


TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 


193 







-48- 



^^.^'^ ^--^ 'feat 



LARCENIES : 

Pocket Picking 1 

Purse Snatching 11 

Shoplifting 12 

From Motor Vehicle 85 

M/V Parts Sc Accessories 11 

Bikes 18 

From Buildings 49 

From Coin Machines 2 

Other 73 

TOTAL LARCENIES: 262 

MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN: 

Autos 18 

Trucks & Buses 2 

Other Vehicles 6 

TOTAL M/V THEFT: 26 

RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES: 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered Wilmington 7 
Stolen Wilmington and 

Recovered Out of Town 20 
Stolen Out of Town and 

Recovered Wilmington 20 

TOTAL RECOVERED: 47 



INCIDENTS REPORTED: 

Alarms Responded to 1,956 

Disturbances 919 

Domestic Problems 253 

Assist Other Agencies 361 

Fires Responded to 91 

Juvenile Complaints 81 

Missing Persons Returned 15 

Missing Persons/Still Missing 

Prowlers Reported 283 
Miscellaneous Complaints 14,451 

M/V Accidents 772 
Cruisers Dispatched 12,002 

Suicides & Attempts 9 

Sudden Deaths 7 

OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Restraining Orders Served 105 

Parking Tickets Issued 213 

Firearms I.D. Issued 97 

License To Carry Issued 275 

Dealer Permits Issued 
Reports to Insurance Company 

and Attorneys 445 



Dogs Licensed 

Complaints 

Trips 

Trip Hours 
Animals Picked Up 
Animals Returned to Owner 
Animals Adopted 
Animals Picked Up Dead 
Animals Euthanized 

(this number reflects sick or 
injured wildlife also) 
Animals Quarantined 
Total Days for Dogs in Kennel 
Barn Inspections 

Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 

Phone Hours 

Total Working Hours 




630 
1, 151 



-49- 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 

Public Buildings Department 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all 
town and school buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are 
properly cleaned and maintained for town employees, school children and 
personnel and the general public. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
1999 : 

A section of roof on the High School was replaced above classroom area. 

Voting machines were programmed and set up for election. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved from school to school for musical 
concerts and plays . 

New section of roof was replaced at the July 4^*^ building. 

New lexon windows were installed in classrooms at the rear of the North 
Intermediate School . 

New lexon windows were installed in all classrooms at the West Intermediate 
School . 

New roof was installed at the Silver Lake Beach House. 



A fresh coat of paint was put 
on the Whitefield School. 

A fresh coat of paint was put 
on the Little West School 
House . 

New carpeting was installed in 
the foyer and hall at the 
Senior Center. 

Electrical wiring was upgraded 
in the Wildwood, North 
Intermediate and High Schools 
for additional computers. 

New fire alarm was installed 
at the West Intermediate 




Public Buildings office on Middlesex Avenue was painted during 1999. 
During the summer all schools were prepared for a successful opening in 
September . 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
town departments, school administration and especially all the employees of 
the Public Buildings Department for their continued help, support and 
cooperation making 1999 a productive year. 



-50- 



Pemiaeent 



Buildie 




Committee 



Nineteen ninety-nine was a very busy year for the Permanent Building 
Committee. We are in the construction phase of the new Middle School. The 
school is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2000. We are also in the 
construction phase for the new Public Safety Building, which is scheduled for 
completion in the fall of 2000. The committee meets at least once every 
month for an update from our project manager on both projects. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Manager, town departments, school administration and especially the people of 
Wilmington in their support and cooperation for the completion of these much 
needed projects. 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. 
Onusseit, hereby respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the 
Wilmington Department of Public Works for the year 1999. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, 
Cemetery, Parks and Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. The coordinating 
of all the activities of all divisions allows the town the optimum use of 
manpower, equipment and materials. 

Highway Division (658-4481) 

All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as 
sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the roadsides, picking up trash 
along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Safety Projects: 

Sidewalks : Sidewalks were constructed on Ballardvale Street from Avalon Oaks 
to the North Intermediate School . Sidewalks were reconstructed on Salem Street 
from Middlesex Avenue to Cunningham Street. 

Guardrails : Guardrails were installed on Glen Road. 

Roadway Projects: 

Chapter 90 roadway construction funds from the Massachusetts Highway Department 
were used for the following projects: the reconstruction of Salem Street from 
Route 125 to Cunningham Street, the reconstruction of Wildwood Street with 
sidewalks from Woburn Street to the Wildwood School (the remainder of Wildwood 
Street to be completed in 2000) . Roadways that were resurfaced using Chapter 
90 funds include the following: Shady Lane Drive, Pinewood Road, Birchwood 
Road, Judith Road, Sprucewood Road, Oakdale Road, Charlotte Road, Draper Drive, 
Buzzell Drive, Appollo Road, and Gunderson Road. Roadways that were disturbed 
by water main construction that were paved, include Shawsheen Avenue, Old 
Shawsheen Avenue, Canal Street, Burt Road, Water Street, Butters Row, Marion 
Street, Walker Street, Philips Avenue, Jones Avenue and Dublin Avenue. 




-53- 



Crack Sealing: For the purposes of improved roadway maintenance, crack sealing 
was accomplished on Forest Street, Harris Street, Cedar Street, Burt Road and 
Kenwood Avenue . 

Drainage : Drainage culverts were installed in Salem Street and Glen Road. 
Woburn Street (adjacent to Great Neck Drive) was cold planned and resurfaced to 
correct a serious runoff deficiency. Drainage improvements were installed on 
Adams Street, Senpek Road and adjacent to the Wilmington Plaza. 

Athletic Field 
Proj ects : A major 
field upgrading 
was accomplished 
on the Shawsheen 
Soccer fields. 
This project 
included drainage, 
irrigation, the 
construction of a 
new field sub-base 
and new field 
surface. The 
entire field was 
then seeded in the 
fall and it will 
be ready for use 
in the summer/fall 
of 2000. 

School Grounds 
Proj ects : Kid's Flace at the Shawsheen School. 

Improvements and 
widenings were 

constructed on the driveways of the North Intermediate School. The field at 
the Wildwood School was graded, loamed and seeded. 

Miscellaneous Projects: A new Veterans' Monument was installed on the Common. 
As part of this project the circular walkway around the monument was 
reconstructed with concrete and brick and landscaping improvements were 
installed adjacent to the monument. A new driveway off Cook Avenue was 
constructed for the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. 

Stream Maintenance Program : We have now completed our fourth year of brook and 
stream maintenance. A crew of six college students was hired to clean, by 
hand, some of the streams and brooks throughout town. The program in 1999 
concentrated on the brooks, streams and culverts on the eastern part of town. 
The stream and brook maintenance program evolved from a joint effort between 
the Department of Public Works and the Conservation Department with its goal to 
restore the quality of the streams and brooks and reduce flooding. 

Snow Sc Ice Removal : The Highway Division recorded 46 inches of snow for the 
winter of 1998 - 1999. The average snowfall is 54.0 inches. 

The DPW mechanics continued with the upgrading of the town's fleet of sanders 
begun in 1998, with the installation of central hydraulic systems on two of the 
DPW's fleet of six sanders. This work is proposed to be completed in 2000. 




-55- 



Tree Division (658-2809) 



The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying, tree removal and tree planting. We removed roadside trees 
that were dead or interfered with public safety at numerous locations. Trees 
were removed for the construction of the driveway project off Cook Avenue. 
Trees and bushes were trimmed around the grounds of the Harnden Tavern. 

The Town Common was illuminated again this year with a fine display of 
Christmas lights installed by the Tree Division. 

Dutch Elm Disease : We removed twelve Dutch Elm diseased trees. Ten disease 
resistant elm trees were planted at various locations in town by Eagle Scout 
James Devine with the assistance of the DPW. 

Mosquito Control : The town contracts its mosquito control out to the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project, who currently provides services to 28 
cities and towns throughout Middlesex and Worcester counties. 

The project's headquarters are located at 111 Otis Street, Northboro, MA. 
Tours of the headquarters or visits to field work sites may be arranged by 
calling the office in advance. Telephone (508) 393-3055. 

The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito Management (IMM) , blending state of the 
art methods and techniques with expertise, experience, and scientific research 
to provide member communities with modern, environmentally sound, cost 
effective mosquito control. 

As part of the effort to reduce the need for pesticides they continue to expand 
their water management program. By cleaning clogged and overgrown waterways, 
mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are restored and water quality is 
improved . 

BTI mosquito larvicide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are found. 
They routinely check known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to 
notify them of any areas they suspect could breed mosquitoes. Field crews will 
investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 

The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or 
larviciding but it is recognized that there are times when adult mosquito 
spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases residential and 
recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted 
sprayers . 

Cemetery Division (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations 
for monuments, etc. 



Burials 



Receipts 



Died in Wilmington 
Died Elsewhere 
Non- Residents 
Cremations 
Infants 



35 

53 
51 
27 

4 

170 



Interments 

Foundations 

Deeds 



$ 57, 408 . 25 



$ 53 , 505 . 00 
$ 3,863.25 
$ 40 . 00 



Reserve 



Trust Fund 



Sale of Lots $23,027.00 Perpetual Care $ 21,000.00 

Refund Reserve - 200.00 
Refund Trust - 2 0.00 

TOTAL $101,035.25 

Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting 
grass, trimming shrubs, marking ballfields for baseball, softball, football, 
field hockey and soccer. All fields and parks were fertilized and brush was 
cleared from the air vents at all the town's schools. 




ROBERT P. 

PALMER 
PARK 




On June 24, 1999 the Town dedicated the fields behind Town Hall in honor of retired DPW Superintendent Robert P. 
Palmer. Pictured left to right: Robert P. Palmer, Selectman Michael J. Newhouse and Richard Palmer. 



Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions with 
engineering related projects, such as, but not limited to: 

Highway Division: With the layout and construction specifications for the 
sidewalk projects, the drainage projects, the Shawheen Soccer Field project, 
the Cook Avenue driveway project, the Salem Street Reconstruction and other 
engineering related work. 

Planning Board & Conservation Commission: Reviewed subdivision plans and made 
recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction . 



Household Rubbish Collection, Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 



The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works . If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

The yardwaste recycling program continued with the recycling of brush and 
Christmas trees, in addition to the existing recycling of leaves and grass 
clippings . 

In order to make the disposal of household hazardous waste more convenient and 
accessible, the town implemented a shared Household Hazardous Waste Collection 
program with the neighboring towns of Andover, Chelmsford, and North Andover. 
This new program will allow Wilmington residents to participate in the various 
collection days of the participating communities. 

Water & Sewer Department (658-4711) 

Water : The Sargent Water Treatment Plant (WTP) had extensive work performed 
on its computers to meet Y2K compliance issues. The system performed 
flawlessly over the New Year's weekend. 

The Butters Row WTP wellfields were fitted with specific conductivity meters 
and automated reading system. This system will immediately notify plant 
personnel when there is a change in groundwater quality that could indicate a 
need to make changes in the WTP operations. This is another backup system to 
insure the highest water quality possible. 

The Shawsheen Avenue wellfield was refurbished allowing the town to control 
pump flow from the WTP. New pumps, motors, telemetry and redevelopment of 
the well were all part of the project. 

The department forces cleaned all the raw water mains in town, restoring 
approximately one million gallons of capacity to our system. 

All water storage tanks were inspected for defects and deterioration of the 
coatings. It was determined the tanks are in good condition with some minor 
flaws that will be corrected this spring. 

The department delivered its first Consumer Confidence Report to all the 
residences and businesses in town. The report will be sent out annually and 
should be in your mail by July each year. It will be available on the town's 
web page in the future. 

We have developed a written conservation plan with the hope to reduce water 
consumption. It is in everyone's best interest to use water responsibly and 
not waste this precious commodity. 

Water mains were replaced by town employees on Jere Road, Glen Road, 
Bernstein Road and Corey Avenue. This increases hydraulic capacity and fire 
protection in these areas. In addition, we installed 500 feet of water main 
to the reconstructed Shawsheen School soccer field. 

During the spring months, a comprehensive water main flushing and valve 
exercising program was performed. This program aids in removing sediments in 
the water mains, identifies which fire hydrants need repair and helps ensure 
that the water gates in the system remain in good working condition. Needed 



-58- 



repairs on the identified broken hydrants and water gates are also performed 
during this time period. 

The department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
town. In addition, the department removes the snow around all fire hydrants 
and assists the Highway Department with roadway snow removal . 



Pumping Statistics : 



Maximum Gallons Per Day 5,334,100 

Maximum Gallons Per Week 36,048,100 

Maximum Gallons Per Month 144,414,400 

Average Gallons Per Day 3,074,374 

Average Gallons Per Month 93,512,217 

Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 1,122,146,600 

Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 1,194,179,600 



Precipitation Statistics: 

Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 
Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 

Consumption Statistics: 

Municipal Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Residential Use (Gallons) * 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Industrial Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Total Metered Use (Gallons)** 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Unaccounted for Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 



38.89" 
43.5" 



5, 845, 949 
1% 

646, 770, 894 
58% 

450, 295, 454 
40% 

102 , 912 ,297 
98% 

19, 234 ,303 
2% 



Residential use includes all residences 
and small commercial users using 5/8-inch 
meters . 

The difference between water pumped and 
water metered represents unaccounted for 
water use and consists of water used for 
flushing mains, main breaks, fighting 
fires, street sweeping, etc. 




Installation of a cellular antenna at the Nassau Avenue 
water storage tank. 



-59- 



Water Distribution System: 

The following new water mains were constructed in 1999: 



Water Mains Installed 


Length 


Size 


Hydrants 


Foley Farm Estates 


350' 


8" 


1 


Marion Street 


1800' 


8" 


5 


Shawsheen School 


460' 


8" 


1 


Carter Lane 


2900' 


12" 


11 


Bridge Lane 


661' 


12 " 


1 


Baker Street 


150' 


8" 


1 


Fenway Street 


130' 


8" 


1 


Mains Replaced 


Length 


Size 


Increase Hydra 


Jere Road 


1370' 


2" 


to 8" 3 


Main Street 


2093' 


8" 


to 12" 5 


Glen Road 


75' 


8" 


to 8" 


Corey Avenue 


400' 


2" 


to 8" 1 


Bernstein Road 


300' 


2" 


to 8" 1 



Total water mains installed in 1999 were 5,035 feet of 8-inch, 5,654 of 12- 
inch. There were 31 hydrants and 62 services installed in the system. 

Sewer Collection System: 

Sewer : The Sewer Department has completed the majority of the Route 38 and 
Middlesex Avenue sewer project. The sewer mains and two associated pump 
stations should be in operation by summer 2000. 

The town's forces, in conjunction with the MWRA, are cleaning the sewer 
interceptor from the septage station south to Fames Street. This is done to 
remove the accumulation of debris in the pipes causing a restriction in flow. 
We are now looking at the entire sewer system to determine if other 
restrictions or defects exist. 

The town, its consultant, and the Department of Environmental Protection 
(DEP) continue to move forward on the townwide Environmental Impact Report 
(EIR) . The scope of this project is enormous consisting of many 
environmental issues to be addressed. It could be several years before the 
final EIR is completed and accepted by the DEP. 

The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 1999: 



Sewer Mains - Location 


Length 


Size 


Main Street (Gravity) 


4 , 294 . 5 ' 


8" 


Main Street (Forced) 


2 , 598 ' 


6" 


Brand Avenue (Forced) 


379 ' 


6" 


Middlesex Avenue (Gravity) 


1, 035 ' 


10" 


Middlesex Avenue (Forced) 


1, 035 ' 


6" 


Adelaide Street (Gravity) 


400 ' 


10" 


Adelaide Street (Forced) 


438.5' 


6" 


Carter Lane (Forced) 


2 , 880 • 


6" 



Total sewer mains installed in 1999 were 7,330.5 feet of force main and 
5,729.5 feet of gravity main. There were 42 sewer connections made to the 
system. 



-60- 



HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 



The Wilmington Memorial Library marked 1999, the end of the decade and the 
last year of the 20th century, by improving access to the new and rapidly 
changing world of technology and also to timeless traditional services that 
contribute to the love of reading and lifelong learning. 

In July of this year, patrons began virtually accessing the library from 
their home at the library's official new web site, www . wilmlibrary . org . The 
web site set up by Laurel Toole, Technical Services Librarian, received start 
up funding for the first year from the Friends of the Library. The site 
provides information about library services, programs and policies. It also 
provides links to the online catalog and to selected Internet resources on 
the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium (MVLC) home page. During the last 
six months of 1999, there were over 800 visits to the library's web site. 

In 1999 the library assumed the role of formally teaching patrons how to 
utilize new technology to access information by offering basic Internet 
classes. These classes, which began in the summer with four weekly one half 
hour classes, continued twice a week through the fall. A total of 77 patrons 
learned how to access information on the Internet by the end of the year. 
The three Internet workstations at the library were used by 4,461 patrons. 

The library's offering of specialized databases continued to improve and 
expand through membership in the Northeast Massachusetts Regional Library 
System (NMRLS) . The library has access to about 300 electronic databases 
covering newspapers, periodicals, and information on business, education, 
government, health and other issues. 

During the year, the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium (MVLC) began the 
process of investigating and evaluating vendors for the next generation 
computer system for the network. Library staff attended demonstrations of 
proposed vendors and Library Director Christina Stewart, in her role of Vice 
President/President-Elect of MVLC, was appointed to chair the Directors' 
System Selection Committee. The new system is expected to be implemented in 
2000 and should provide more user- friendly access to the collection and to 
patron online services. 

For the library staff, 1999 was a year for meeting the challenge of keeping 
up with the constant learning curve dictated by rapidly changing technology. 
Staff participated in training seminars throughout the year on a variety of 
topics to develop and improve their skills. Some of the 60 seminars attended 
by library staff included "Troubleshooting Windows 95/98, "HTML: The 
Basics," "Subject Sites on the Internet," "Focus on Business Databases," and 
"Train the Trainer: Teaching Internet Skills in your Library." 




-61- 



Dorothy Wiberg, Technical Services Assistant, who came to work at the library 
in 1985 on the advent of the library's entry into the computer age, retired 
in July. Dorothy's coworkers and the patrons who knew her will always 
remember her passionate dedication to good library service. Gena Weaver, a 
former library employee, was hired as Technical Services Assistant in August. 
Linda Berlik, who worked as a part-time library aid at the main circulation 
desk since 1996, filled the new full time position of Adult Circulation 
Assistant in July. 

In tandem with technology based services, the library continued to provide 
traditional library services with a customer service style that received 
kudos from our patrons. The library circulated 160,245 books and other 
library material in 1999, a 5% increase over last year. Although patrons 
sometimes sought the answers to their information inquiry on the Internet at 
home, patrons still turned to the expertise of the reference staff when their 
Internet search was unsuccessful. Reference questions for 1999 totaled 
20,024. Staff placed 4,831 holds for material requested by patrons and 
borrowed 2,536 items for patrons from other libraries. The library 
reciprocated by loaning 3,092 books to libraries in our network and other 
regions in the state. The library staff registered 1,183 new patrons with a 
year-end total of 14,915 people with Wilmington library cards. 

In 1999, 5,315 new titles were added to the collection. The Technical 
Services Department ordered and processed these new items with remarkable 
efficiency giving our patrons new offerings on a regular and timely schedule. 
In order to acquire much needed space for shelving and displaying new library 
materials, staff also worked assiduously weeding 9,076 items from the 
collection. This labor intensive task which continues to be a major project 
will also help develop a collection of library materials that is more up to 
date and more accessible for patrons looking for specific items or just 
browsing . 

The Children's Department had another banner year! The annual summer reading 
program "Funny Things Happen When You Read" began with "Wacky Wednesday" on 
the Town Common. This year's program broke all previous records for number 
of participants with 832 children registering. The Children's Department 
also received an "honorable mention" for the 1998 summer reading program 
"Unlock the Mystery-Read" in the Massachusetts Library Association 14th 
Annual Public Relations Awards Contest in May. 

Funding from the "Community Partnership for Children' s Grant" through the 
Massachusetts Department of Education brought talented performers to the 
library that enhanced the number and quality of program offerings. The 
traditional story hour programs were also expanded in order to accommodate 
all Wilmington preschool children who wanted to register. In total, the 
attendance at children's programs for the year was 7,190. 

With the help of the Friends of the Library, special programs for adults in 
1999 included some mystery, art, and history. In February the Friends of the 
Library sponsored the library's second author program with special guest, 
mystery writer, Philip Craig. The Friends held two art auctions, one in May 
and one in October, successfully auctioning withdrawn art prints that were 
part of the library's collection in the late 1970' s. In November Kathleen 
Black Reynolds, the Town Curator, presented "Bond-Wilmington's Bond," a 
program that explained the significance of the documents and memorabilia 
included in the Arthur T. Bond collection. For the second year, volunteers 
from the Friends of the Library brought books to residents who are homebound. 



This program received recognition with an honorable mention in the 1999 
Massachusetts Friends of the Library "Great Ideas" contest. 

In order to continue to remain responsive to the interests and needs of 
Wilmington residents and to prepare for and better manage the future, the 
library began work on its second long range plan. The library looked to the 
community for a vision that will enable it to make a positive difference in 
the life of Wilmington residents as it moves into the 21st century. 
Utilizing the Public Library Association's new planning process "Planning for 
Results," the first planning steps were taken in May 1999 with orientation 
and training for the Library Director at a workshop presented by the 
Northeastern Massachusetts Library System (NMRLS) . Throughout the summer the 
Library Director worked on preliminary planning steps with the training 
consultant from NMRLS. In August 1999 NMRLS consultants presented a training 
workshop for staff and trustees on the "Planning for Results" process. The 
planning committee, which consists of community representatives, library 
staff, a library trustee and the Library Director, met in September and in 
October . 

The committee chose the following service responses that will direct the way 
the library will serve the public in the next five years: 

Commons - A library that provides a COMMONS environment helps address the 
need of people to meet and interact with others in their community and to 
participate in public discourse about community issues. 

Current Topics and Titles - A library that provides CURRENT TOPICS AND TITLES 
helps to fulfill community residents' appetite for information about popular 
culture and social trends and their desire for satisfying recreational 
experiences . 

Lifelong Learning - A library that provides LIFELONG LEARNING service helps 
address the desire for self -directed personal growth and development 
opportunities . 

The Library Director, with library staff, will develop goals and objectives 
to address these service responses with final approval of the plan expected 
in February 2000. Having a long range plan, a requirement of the 
Massachusetts Library Construction Program, puts the library in place to move 
forward with a feasibility study in 2000 to determine whether the current 
library building can be expanded or whether other options should be 
considered. The FY2001-FY2005 Long Range Plan includes objectives for 
planning a new library building. As these objectives are achieved, residents 
will have in the new century a modern library facility that will be a source 
of community pride and a resource for individual and community improvement. 

Thanks are extended to all who made monetary donations to the library in 
1999 . 

Thanks to the Friends of the Library for their continued enthusiastic support 
in making a good library a better one. Thanks to all our library patrons for 
the expressed appreciation and good will and support they extend for the 
service the library strives to provide to the community. 



-63- 




LIBRARY STAFF 

Administration : 
Christina Stewart, Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, Part-time Administrative Assistant 

Adult Services : 
Laura Hodgson, Reference and Adult Service Librarian 
Linda Callahan, Circulation Librarian 
Linda Berlik, Adult Circulation Assistant 
Susan Piaggio-0' Keef e , Part-time Reference Librarian 
Ruth Ellen Donnelly, Meena Swaminathan, 
Part-time Library Assistants 
Lauren Giannotti, Amanda Gustin, Michele Haynes, 
Ryann Murray, Anthony Szabo, Part-time Library Pages 

Children's Services: 
Susan MacDonald, Children's Librarian 
Barbara Michaud, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, Children's Circulation Assistant 
Barbara Bresnahan, Part-time Library Assistant 
Elizabeth Berlik, Alicia Kendall, David Merry, 
Kathleen Neville, Maya Persuad-Dubey , Part-time Library Pages 

Technical Services : 
Laurel Toole, Head of Technical Services 
Anna Percuoco, Technical Services Assistant 
Gene Weaver, Technical Services Assistant 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1999 



Hours Open Weekly 
Winter 



Summer 



Monday through Saturday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Monday through Friday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 



Population 

Number New Patrons Registered 
Total Registered Borrowers 
Number of library visits 



64 
56 

21,406 
1,183 
14 , 915 
117, 904 



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Number of Items in Collection 
Books 

Books on Tape 
Compact Discs 
Audio Cassettes 
Videos 

Miscellaneous 
Items per capita 

Subscriptions 

Newspapers 

Periodicals 

Microfilm 



91, 686 



17, 754 
820 
547 
413 

1, 457 
692 



4 .28 



9 

155 
4 



Museum Passes 
Circulation 

Circulation per capita 7.48 

Interlibrary Loan 

From other libraries 2,536 
To other libraries 3,092 



160, 245 



5, 628 



Reserves 

Reference and Reader's Services 

Internet Use 

Meeting Room Use 
Library use 
Community use 

Library Programs 

Children's Programs 
Adult Programs 

Total attendance at programs 

Children's Programs 
Adult Programs 

Coimcil for the Arts 



306 
22 



272 
42 



7 , 190 
320 



4,831 
20 , 024 
4 , 944 
328 

314 

7, 510 



The Wilmington Council for the Arts was established in 1980 by the Board of 
Selectmen. Since then, the Council has endeavored to encourage increased 
interest and awareness of the Arts throughout the community. Our main 
function is to review applications and distribute monies from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council. Then in 1987, the Arts Council was given the 
use of the Old Town Hall to use as an Arts Center. We are very proud of our 
record of use the Wilmington Arts Center has seen over the following years. 
The year of 1999 was no exception. 

The granting process begins in the fall of the year. Notification of the 
amount to be granted is sent out to the various Arts Councils across the 
state. The details and deadlines are publicized in the local newspapers. 
Then, as the applications pour in, the work begins for the Council. This 



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year we received 27 applications - total requests of over $15,000. Our 
allotment of just over $6,000 obviously would not take care of every request. 
The Council goes over each application, discusses the merits of each one and 
makes some tough decisions. Each Council is allowed local guidelines. The 
Wilmington Arts Council likes to spread the grant money out over as much of 
the town as possible. This includes the Senior Center, all the schools, 
local concerts on the Common, museum passes and library programs. After the 
grants are approved on the local level, they are sent to the state for 
further review. Eventually, reimbursements are given out to the recipients 
when their projects or performances are completed. If your children go on a 
field trip, if you borrow a pass from the library to the Museum of Fine Arts, 
or if you listen to a concert on the Common on a summer evening, chances are 
monies from the Arts Council helped to pay for these events. 

Art education is another goal for the Arts Center. The Wilmington Arts 
Council is very fortunate to have two wonderful watercolor teachers. Louise 
Anderson, a very accomplished artist herself, has taught at the Center since 
1989. Carolyn Latanision, a national award winning artist, also teaches. 
Both teachers take beginners and advanced students. In 1999, we added 
another teacher. After a long search and many requests for an oil painting 
teacher, we now have Gayle Levee teaching at the Center. The Arts Council is 
now involved in planning for a drawing class for sixth graders and up. We 
look forward to that! We also have two piano teachers that use our old, but 
useful piano for their recitals. 

Many art -oriented groups used the Arts Center this year. The Merrimack 
Valley Sweet Adelines have been rehearsing at the Center for years. In 
December, they gave the Council and the people of Wilmington a free concert 
of Christmas songs and old standards. In 1999, a new group, the New England 
Repertory Theatre Group, began using the Center for rehearsals. They perform 
at the Wilmington High School, with rave reviews! The Wilmington Garden Club 
again made use of the Center with their annual Festival of Trees; a beautiful 
collection of decorated Christmas trees from the different organizations in 
town. The Andovers Artist Guild had their Christmas Art Show at the Center. 

We also have special events at the Arts Center. The highlight of this year 
was the Kammermusik String Quartet who played on a beautiful Sunday afternoon 
in October. This concert was sponsored by the Arts Council and free to the 
public. We listened to music by Handel, Mendelson, Mozart and Borodin. The 
concert finished with a lighter touch - music by Gershwin. This year the 
Council sponsored two bus trips, both to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. 
Over forty people ventured forth to see the impressive John Singer Sargent 
Show. And more than twenty went to see the Mary Cassatt Show. Both shows 
were very popular and more excursions are being planned for the year 2000. 

Our most ambitious and popular project for the year is our annual Art Show. 
This year was our 19"^*^. Held on the last weekend of June, our show is truly 
representative of local talent. Everyone can enter, whether your art is 
watercolor, oil painting, pastels, pen and ink or sculpture. Three different 
artists judge the show every year. Ribbons and monetary prizes are given out 
to the winners in each category. There are five categories including student 
work. There is also a Best in Show prize awarded by the Arts Council. This 
year we had more than 13 pieces of artwork. 

The Wilmington Arts Council believes that this year of 1999 was an exciting 
and dynamic year. The year 2 000 promises to be even better. This will be 
our 20"^*^ year in existence. And we plan to celebrate, with an open house and 



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reception, another fabulous art show, bus trips to museums, concerts, 
artistic demonstrations, art classes and poetry readings! The Arts Council 
meets the first Wednesday of the month at the Arts Center at 7:00 PM. The 
meetings are open and we welcome your input. 



Sarah D. J. Carter, a prominent Wilmington citizen, left the town a bequest 
in 1910 for the purpose of presenting interesting and entertaining programs 
for the enjoyment of the community. 

The 1999 program was held on Sunday, May 23. On this afternoon, the audience 
had the privilege of seeing Peter Harvey, with piano accompaniment, perform 
"Songs of World Wars I & II." The Committee soon found that they had chosen 
a crowd pleaser. Dr. Harvey sang with authority, warmth and vigor. Upon 
wrapping up his performance with a brilliant ending, the appreciative 
audience gave him a standing ovation. 



In the fall of 1999, the town designated the Colonel Joshua Harnden Tavern as 
the Harnden Tavern and Wilmington Town Museum. At this time a part-time 
curator was hired to handle the management of the building. 

Five large framed Wilmington historical photos were put in the hallway of the 
Town Hall by the Commission. 

A boy scout working on his Eagle Scout badge assisted the Commission in 
revitalizing the Old Burial Ground and Scalekeeper ' s office. A display was 
set up inside the Scalekeeper ' s office. Walking tour maps of the Burial 
Ground and Centre Village District were prominently located at the 
Scalekeeper ' s office. 

A revised Wilmington historical map was printed and is available in several 
public buildings. 




Wihnington Arts Center — Middlesex Avenue. 





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Twenty-three historical home plaques were presented to homeowners who 
indicated to the Commission a desire to have their home display its 
historical significance. 

The Commission has been given the large framed World War II George Spanos 
photos . 

Members of the Commission attended a Regional Historical Commission/Society 
meeting in Reading. 

A very enjoyable presentation called, "Bond, Wilmington's Bond" was given at 
the library through the efforts of the Friends of the Library, Historical 
Commission and Museum Curator. The present owners of the Arthur Bond House 
presented the museum with an original blueprint of the house at this time. 

A member of the Historical Commission was appointed to the Town's Open Space 
Committee . 

The Historical Commission Chairperson served on the Veterans' Memorial 
Monument Committee. After the culmination of many hours of meetings the 
Veterans' Monument is now prominently on our Town Common. On Veterans' Day 
1999 a beautiful granite monument was dedicated "in recognition of all who 
served" and "in remembrance of those who did not return." 

Memberships in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic 
Massachusetts were renewed. New memberships included the American 
Association of State and Local History, American Association of Museums, and 
the New England Museum Association. 

The Arthur T. Bond Collection, presently housed and displayed at the Memorial 
Library, has been organized with funding provided by the Bay State Historical 
League's Research Inventory Grant of $1,000. 

The Friends of the 
Harnden Tavern and the 
Wilmington Minutemen 
hosted a Colonial Fair 
on the grounds of the 
Harnden Tavern in 
September. The 
Friends held their 
annual Christmas 
Social, which this 
year was preceded by a 
special party on the 
eve of the Social. 

The Colonel Joshua 
Harnden Tavern is open 
for free tours on the 
first Sunday of the 
month from 2:00 to 
4:00 p.m. The 
Commission also hosts 
students and civic 
groups on private 
tours of the Tavern. 




One of the Town 's beautiful colonials — Harnden Tavern Museum. 



The Historical Commission thanks the Public Buildings Department for the 
fresh paint on our little West Schoolhouse and for further dignifying the 
site with new carriage lanterns. The Public Buildings Department continues 
to work at the Tavern toward the Commission's goal of making a Wilmington 
Town Museum. 

Interior rooms have been painted, a handicap restroom has been installed, a 
new alarm system and a new electrical system have been installed. The Public 
Works Department also is thanked for their hard work at the Tavern cutting 
down trees and shrubs. 

The Historical Commission meets on the second Monday of the month at 7:30 
p.m. in the Harnden Tavern. 



The Recreation Department completed its 29th year with a full-time Director. 
Along with the full-time Director is a full-time Senior Clerk and a part-time 
office assistant. The department office is located in Room 8 in Town Hall. 
Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Assisting and advising the department is the Recreation Commission. This 
volunteer board which was formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy 
making capacity. Members are: Jay Tighe, Chairman; William Savosik, Vice 
Chairman; Deborah Gray, Secretary; Larry Noel and Charles Burns. 
Commissioners are active in such various related groups as Master Plan 
Advisory Committee, Elks, Girl Scouts and other organizations. 

Even though the Recreation Department remains small, with only two full-time 
employees, it represents the second largest industry (leisure) in our 
country. Over 60 part-time and seasonal employees, along with many 
volunteers, help run the department's programs. The department offers, on a 
year-round basis, an ever-changing slate of activities for all ages of local 
citizens . 

We keep in mind the following guidelines as we plan recreation opportunities 
for the town: 

• provide opportunities for self-expression 

• offer programs which develop a sense of personal worth 

• provide activities that allow for personal achievement and 
accomplishment 

• provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

• provide physical activities which are new and different, offering 
a certain amount of challenge to participants 

• teach skills in various activities that will have carryover value 
in later life 

• provide a variety of healthy and diversified programs 

• make programs as accessible as possible to all 




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Volunteers, as always, play a key role in providing two dollars worth of 
service for every dollar spent. We utilize volunteers in varying capacities 
in many of our programs . They provide a valuable service and gain much 
themselves by volunteering. We also receive much help from local businesses 
and organizations. Some of these invaluable contributors are: Lions Club, 
Kiwanis, Chamber of Commerce, AFSCME Units 1 and 2, Tewksbury/Wilmington 
Elks, Knights of Columbus, Wilmington Police Association, Council of Arts, 
Analog Devices, Ametek Aerospace, Agfa, Reading Cooperative Bank, Royal 
Dynasty, Textron, Stelio's Restaurant, Moore Temps, Video Paradise, Lowell 5* 
Savings, Burger King, Sweetheart Cup, Dandi-Lyons, Auxiliary Police, Pepsi 
Cola, DeMoulas, MASSBANK for Savings, Shriners and Ski Haus . We continue to 
search for new and innovative ways to generate needed funds to keep costs low 
for the recreation consumer. 

The Recreation Department is involved, in varying degrees, with other 
recreation oriented groups. In this capacity we serve as a quasi -consulting 
agency. We also loan recreation equipment and facilities to families and 
groups for various functions. We use the Shawsheen Tech pool for our summer 
swim lessons program. We are a handy information source and referral agency 
answering a wide variety and a large number of questions every day. 

Our basic programs for the year were: Santa's Workshop, Horribles Parade, 
Basketball League (WRBL) , Adult Gym, Swimming Lessons, CPR, Aerobics, 
Discounts to Commercial Recreation Enterprises, Florida Discounts, T-Ball, 
Easter Egg Hunt, Summer Playgrounds, Tiny Tots, Fun With Music, Special Needs 
Summer Program, Public Beach Lifeguard Supervision, Canoe Rental and Clinic, 
Tennis Lessons, Concerts on the Common, Fishing Derby, Co-ed Volleyball, Free 
Loan of Fishing, Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, Aerobics, Hawaii and other VCR 
tapes. Video Camp, Police Association Beach Day, Easter Coloring Contest, 
Sale of Entertainment Discount Books, Special Needs Trips to the Shriners 
Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom, Latin and Swing Dancing Lessons, Children's Tea 
Parties, Top Secret Science Workshops, Kinder Karate, Junior Basketball, Sale 
of Ski Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball League and Clinics, Golf 
Lessons, Massage for Couples, Play Gym, Letters from Santa, Town Park . 
Softball Leagues, Junior and Intermediate Bowling Leagues, Baby Sitting 
Courses, Piano Lessons, Kids Dance Classes, Model Airplane Clinics, Kids 
Craft Classes and Adult Craft Classes. 

We sold reduced 
rate tickets 
for: Celtics, 
Showcase and 
General Cinemas, 
Disney on Ice at 
FleetCenter , 
Barnum & Bailey 
Circus , 

Globetrotters , 
N.E. Revolution, 
Topsfield Fair, 
Big "E", Water 
Country, 
Gallagher, Lock 
Monsters, Figure 
Skating 
Champions On 
Ice, Christmas 
Tea Parties — one of the Recreation Department 's new programs. These young ladies are 
enjoying a Japanese Tea Party. 




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Carol, Anastasia & Little Mermaid, Sesame Street, 
Big Apple Circus, Engelbert Humperdinck and Flower 



Nashoba 
Show . 



Valley Ski Area, 




Our trips 
continue to 
grow in 
popularity. 
Day trips 
included : 
Flower Show, 
Deerfield and 
Yankee Candle, 
Boston Duck 
Tours , New 
York City, 
Cranes Beach 
Sand Castle 
Day, Red Sox, 
Martha' s 
Vineyard, Hu 
Ke Lau, Maple 
Sugar and 
Shopping, 
Tanglewood, 
Lighthouse 
Inn, Captain 

Jacks casile competition at Crane's Beach — a favorite Recreation Department trip. 

Clambake, Octoberfest, JFK Library and Connecticut Casinos (Ledyard and 
Mohegan Sun) . During the summer we took playground, tiny tots and speci 
needs participants on many field trip excursions. Theatre trips include 
Boston Pops, Nutcracker, Evita, Cabaret, Ragtime, Titanic, Alice In 
Wonderland, Waiting In The Wings, Sound of Music and Blue Man Group. 
Overnight trips included: Atlantic City, Las Vegas, New York City, Hawa 
Niagara Falls and Toronto, Williamsburg, Memphis and Nashville and Mt . 
Washington Resort . 



al 
d: 



11 , 



We try to remain versatile and receptive to new ideas and trends. Due to 
changes in demand and other factors, we change our offerings each year. We 
continue to see an increase in the number of participants in many of our 
programs especially youth programs. Our trips for seniors, adults and 
families provide much needed revenue. These trips are in great demand also. 
Arts and crafts programs for children and adults continue to expand too. 

Some other groups that offer leisure type programs in Wilmington are: Little 
League, Public Library, Elderly Services Department, Youth Hockey, Pop 
Warner, Figure Skating Club, Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, July 4th 
Committee, Community Schools, Council for the Arts, Fraternal & Service 
Organizations, Scouts, Campfire Boys and Girls and the Ristuccia Skating 
Rink. Schools and churches round out the active recreation picture. The 
independent Youth Center at St. Thomas is a big plus for teens. There is a 
new play area at the beach thanks to Kiwanis. 



The lack of commercial recreation in Wilmington, such as bowling centers and 
movie theaters and the lack of agencies such as YMCA's and Boys/Girls Clubs 
stress the importance of town support for this department, especially now 
with a growing youth population and a growing demand for recreation 
opportunities . 



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Elderly Services 

This has been a fun and exciting year. The Senior Center was able to 
continue with their many programs, but also add a few more exciting new 
programs and events. 

Many weekly activities continue to be available to the seniors. These 
activities include exercise classes, arts and crafts, art class 
(painting and drawing), line dancing, sing-a-long groups, wood shop, bingo, 
nutritional classes, ceramics, sewing, knitting, crocheting and card games. 
We also are fortunate to have a town nurse who visits weekly to provide blooi 
pressure clinics, B-12 shots, diabetic screenings and monthly cholesterol 
screenings . For seniors unable to make it to the Center due to health 
ailments, she is able to make home visits. Other monthly services include 
podiatrist, hearing aid specialist and the SHINE coordinator. Volunteer 
accountants from AARP come yearly, from the first week of February through 
the last week of March, to assist elders with their taxes. A monthly "Social 
Calendar" is mailed out each month and is available at the Center. This not 
only provides information about the activities at the Center but also 
assistance programs, such as the Senior Pharmacy Program, and keeps everyone 
aware of services that are available to them. 

The town has a full-time van driver to meet the transportation needs for the 
elderly in our community. Our van is equipped to handle two wheelchairs 
along with six other regular seats. We are now more able to transport 
seniors to their needed medical appointments (within a thirteen mile radius 
of Wilmington) , shopping and to the Senior Center. The van continues to be a 
vital service to the elders of Wilmington. Our full-time respite care worker 
further complements this service. She also provides needed transportation, 
but with one-on-one attention. This may include transportation for radiation 
treatments. X-rays and blood transfusions. She was able to make 668 personal 
visits to seniors in the community. This position is a very vital role for 
the community. One example of the importance of such a position, is a call 
the director received from a very involved family member stating, "without 
this service I don't know how we could continue to keep my mother at home. 
She needs to go to dialysis three times a week and I can't take all that time 
off from work. I just wanted to call and thank you personally." The respite 
care worker keeps the Center in contact with seniors who are unable to get 
out on their own and who are unable to visit the Senior Center. She has also 
assisted many seniors in applying for fuel assistance and other important 
social welfare-type applications. 

Another vital part of the Senior Center is our Home Delivered Meals Program. 
This past year the numbers have increased from 15,966 meals delivered in 1998 
to 17,737 meals delivered in 1999. This program provides the seniors of 
Wilmington with one hot meal five days a week, for the minimal cost of a 
dollar a meal. Keep in mind that this is the only daily communication some 
seniors have. To further emphasize this point, one of our dedicated drivers 
went to deliver a meal to a homebound elder. He thought it strange that the 
elder did not respond, so he took it upon himself to get help. She was found 
on the floor in her bedroom and had been there since the previous night 
unable to get help. The elder and her family were greatly appreciative to 
the driver for his thoughtfulness . The seniors that are able to get out have 
the opportunity to have a hot lunch at the High School Congregate Site. This 
not only gives them the opportunity for a hot meal but a time to see their 
peers. This year 3,886 meals were served. 



-74- 



Some of the continuing specialty programs are: The "Homebound Library 
Program" where the Senior Center was able to collaboratively work with the 
Wilmington Memorial Public Library, where volunteers deliver books, tapes and 
videos to homebound elders on a regular basis; the "Food Pantry Box" where, 
on a weekly basis, donated food collected by the Senior Center is delivered 
to the Wilmington Food Pantry to assist the needy families in our town; 
"Audio Cassette Library, " a program made possible by a donation of 77 tapes 
to the Senior Center. A listing of books along with the authors are made 
available to the seniors to borrow on a weekly basis. Again in May, the 
Center was chosen to participate in a unique exercise program called, "Rise 
and Shine." The Senior Center, in collaboration with the VNA of Middlesex 
East, was able to offer this twelve-week program due to a grant from 
Minuteman Home Care. The purpose is to prevent falls of the older adult 
through increased strengthening, flexibility and endurance training. Also, 
the Senior Center 
wanted to be able to 
give back to the 
community, so a 
Wilmington 
Scholarship Fund was 
developed. In June 
1999, the seniors 
presented our first 
annual scholarship to 
a high school senior 
of Wilmington High 
School who has an 
interest in social 
work and/ or 
gerontology. The 
second annual fan 
drive collected 
donated fans to share 
with elders that are 
in need of relief Senior citizens enjoy a musical production at the Senior Center sponsored by the 

from the heat. Our Wihnington Arts Council. 

intent was to make sure that no senior went without some sort of relief from 
the heat. Finally, the Senior Center wanted to do something special for the 
holiday season. We had our second annual holiday tree called the "Giving 
Tree." This tree gave the community the opportunity to help elderly people 
in their town. The response was overwhelming. There were over 50 families 
and individuals who responded and 67 packages were given to the elderly in 
the community. This year the department was fortunate to have two volunteers 
assist in this program who were from the West Intermediate School - Jillian 
Abell and Erin Dorrance . They helped set up the "Giving Tree," made labels 
and assisted the director in delivering all the presents personally to each 
elder. All seniors who received the wonderful gifts were extremely 
appreciative . 




Some of the new programs developed this year are: "Free Legal Consultations" 
where Attorney Nancy Hogan gave a seminar that was sponsored by the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs and the New England Chapter of Elder Law Attorneys. 
Due to the wonderful response she offered to come to the Center on a monthly 
basis. She is very busy for the entire two and one half -hours and has agreed 
to continue as long as there is a need. The first annual Senior Health Fair 
was sponsored by the Board of Health and the Department of Elder Services. 



-75- 



There was information on blood pressure screenings, blood sugar screenings, 
nutritional information, osteoporosis information, skin care, diabetes 
updates and smoking cessation. Also Minuteman Home Care and Wilmington 
Family Counseling set up informational booths to describe the services they 
provide. The response was wonderful and many found it to be very 
informative. The "Caregivers Forum" was an event to help educate the 
caregivers and their families of the services that can be provided in and out 
of their homes. There were a group of panelists from services such as: In- 
Home Providers, Social Day/Adult Day Health Programs, Assisted Living and 
Nursing Homes. This was a great opportunity for family members to understand 
each type of service and openly discuss them with the providers. 



This year 
the Center 
was also 
fortunate to 
have two 
interns . 
They came 
from the 
Geriatric 
Cert- 
ification 
Program at 
the 

University 
of Mass . 
Each intern 
was a true 
asset to the 
Center . 



We would Buzzell Senior Cenler. 

like to take 

this 

opportunity 

to thank the following for thei 
for their daily supply of donut 
Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that 
monthly donations for financial 
annual catered homebound meal. 
Playtime Vending for the beauti 
Dance Connection, Inc. for thei 
Cavanaugh, owner of Cavanaugh's 
popular magazine subscriptions; 
Christmas Tree and to all the c 
give-a-ways and who donated hea 




r generous donations in 1999. Dunkin' Donuts 
s ; Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks for their 
served 250 seniors this year; Rotary for their 
ly strapped elders; Lions Club for their 
outdoor patio chairs, and answering machine; 
ful new covering for the pool table; Tammy's 
r outstanding live performance; William 
Funeral Home, for the yearly donation of 10 
Maple Meadow Gardens for their annual 
lubs and businesses who donated for raffle 
ting oil to needy elderly residents. 



Thanks to the Town Manager, Michael Caira, and all the town department heads 
for your help and ongoing assistance. Thanks to the seniors who volunteered 
hundreds of hours visiting lonely seniors in their homes, hospitals and 
nursing homes; for the volunteers who delivered holiday catered meals to the 
home bound; also to the instructors that volunteer faithfully every week to 
instruct classes and programs. Thanks to all that made it possible for our 
second year of the "Giving Tree" to be a huge success. Lastly, thanks to all 
who gave their time and money in making the Senior Citizen Holiday Fair a 
success again this year. 



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Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 
24CFR(Code of Federal Regulations); Chapter 3 OB of the State Procurement 
Law, and State and Federal Code of Ethics. A five-member Board of 
Commissioners, consisting of four elected and one state appointed member, 
oversees the Authority's policies and procedures. The Executive Director is 
charged with the administration of these procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) families and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 Certificate Program. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough 
housing for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally 
independently but who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington 
Housing Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive 
home care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed and another program currently being 
pursued by the Authority is housing for frail elders, which would provide 
housing, meals, medical care and other services, while allowing seniors to 
maintain private quarters . 

There were numerous vacancies in 1999 for the Senior Housing Development. 
There were several vacancies in the low income properties and they required 
extensive repairs . 

The Share Program was instituted in 1993 and since that time has doubled in 
size. A great deal of thanks to the organizers of this program and to the 
many seniors and other community activists who make this program work. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. We would also like to extend our appreciation to 
the Wilmington Department of Public Works for their assistance in keeping our 
roads clear during the inclement weather. Also to Michael Caira, Town 
Manager and all the town employees who bring a better quality of living to 
all our tenants. 



The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities is a commission established to 
address the issues and concerns of the disabled community, their families and 
other interested parties . 

The Commission sponsored a two-day Community Access Monitor training program 
presented by the Massachusetts Office on Disability. The training certifies 
participants who complete the requirements to survey sites and assess 




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compliance with architectural accessibility for people with physical, visual, 
hearing or other disabilities, according to the Massachusetts Architectural 
Access Regulations and the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act. We had 
many people from surrounding towns in attendance including building 
inspectors, ADA Coordinators, Zoning Board of Appeals representatives, etc. 

Transportation issues were addressed. Through our advocacy efforts, the 
contractors for The Ride have been changed twice this year for the better, 
and the territory revised resulting in improved quality of service. 

We continued our support to the library and helped to build their books on 
tape collection. This helps the disabled community including those with 
visual impairments, dyslexia and physical disabilities which preclude a 
person from holding books, to name a few. 

The town's polling facilities are fully accessible for voters with 
disabilities . 

For projects currently under construction and those proposed for the future, 
we reviewed and continue to be involved with: the fishing pier design and 
parking area proposed for Silver Lake, the new middle school project, and the 
MBTA Depot and parking area. 

The Commission continues to attend conferences and training sessions, 
especially in conjunction with the MA Office on Disability and the Northeast 
Independent Living Program (NILP) . 

The Commission assisted residents with concerns regarding in-home 
accessibility, housing assistance, transportation, service animals, and 
independent living. The Commission also responded to complaints of access 
issues in town, and assisted private business with site surveys. 

We continue to have a positive relationship with the Wilmington ADA Committee 
and the Wilmington Special Needs Advisory Council. We look forward to 
working with these groups to provide essential resources and assistance for 
the disabled population. 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 
115, as amended, with strict compliance to this chapter, the rules and 
policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

Benefits are for the needy veteran and his immediate family who have been 
subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits comes from the 
Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Total funds expended for aid to veterans and their families for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1999 was $10,463.50. Funds appropriated for the fiscal 
year 2000 total $10,000. The amount expended during the first six months of 
the fiscal year 2000 was $1,481.00, leaving a balance of $8,519.00 for the 
remainder of the fiscal year. 




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Additional benefits expended by the Veterans' Affairs Administration directly 
to the veteran population in Wilmington was $1,338,000 for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1999. This represents the amount of tax dollars not required 
to be expended for those who, because of circumstances, find it necessary to 
apply for aid. 




Town Manager Micluul A. Clu/li sptuks ai ilie dedication of the Veterans' Monument on Town Common 
November II. 1999. 



The office of the Board of Health is located in the Town Hall at 121 Glen 
Road in Room 5 and the Public Health Nurse's office is located off of the 
foyer of the Town Hall. The Board of Health consists of three members 
appointed for staggered three year terms by the Town Manager. Serving on the 
Board in 1999 were Chairman James Ficociello, D.D.S. of 500 Main Street, Vice 
Chairman Eugene Kritter of 11 Pilling Road, and Elizabeth Sabounjian 120 
Nichols Street. The Director of Public Health is Gregory Erickson, R.S., 
C.H.O. The Health Inspector is Shelly DelGenio, C.E.H.T., the Public Health 
Nurse is Ann FitzGerald, R.N., the Animal Inspector is Ellen Davis, and the 
Director of Tobacco Control is Linda Kanter, R.N. The secretarial staff is 
shared with the Inspector of Buildings and the Board of Appeals and consists 
of Joan Goulet, Toni LaRivee and Wendy Martiniello. 

Field activities included inspection of restaurants, retail food stores, 
cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, ice cream 
trucks, the Fourth of July activities, caterers, and other temporary food 
stands, percolation tests and soil evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal 
system inspections, nuisance complaints, hazardous waste investigations, 
leaking underground storage tanks, housing inspections, lead paint 
determinations, smoking and tobacco law enforcement, lake water quality 
sampling, Canada geese control and other miscellaneous inspections. 



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The administrative duties of the office include the licensing and the 
enforcement of many of the above items, including issuing permits, 
enforcement orders, issuing citations, and holding hearings. Many court 
appearances were made for the enforcement of local regulations and laws. 
Meetings were attended by the Director in order to coordinate planning and 
development within the town. Board of Health meetings were held twice 
monthly . 

The Title 5 Betterment Loan Program began in 1999. The Board of Health was 
able to help with the repair and upgrade of four septic systems and one house 
was connected to the municipal sewer system. Loans, totaling $48,268, were 
made to these homeowners which are to be repaid to the town through the 
betterment process. The program was made possible by a program directed by 
the Massachusetts Environmental Trust and is intended to continue into 2000. 

The Board of Health was awarded a grant of $27,802 by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health for the continuation of the Tobacco Control 
Program. This program employs a part-time Director. In addition to 
community education, four hypnotherapy sessions for smoking cessation were 
held. These sessions are continuing into 2000. The program also provides 
support to the efforts to maintain smoke-free schools. 

Our radon detection and survey program continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public. The residents of the Town of Wilmington have been able 
to purchase radon detection test kits (2 tests per kit) for $20.00 at the 
office of the Board of Health and receive important information for the 
reduction of radon and the associated risk of lung cancer by the radiation 
effects of radon gas. 



The annual rabies clinic for dogs 
and cats was held during the month 
of May. A total of 271 animals were 
vaccinated . 

The Public Health nurse assisted 
with two senior citizen events as 
well as conducting weekly blood 
pressure clinics at the Buzzell 
Senior Center and monthly clinics at 
Deming Way. The first event co- 
sponsored by the Board of Health and 
the senior center was a Health Fair 
held May 6, 1999. Screenings 
included those for cholesterol, 
blood sugar, blood pressure, weight, 
and presentations on nutrition and 
osteoporosis. On May 26, 1999, the 
Director of the Senior Center 
invited several agencies serving the 
elderly to a caregiver's forum. 
Disease prevention, through 
immunization, remains the focus of 
the Public Health Nurses activities. 




Inoculation of a cat at the 1999 rabies clinic. 



The adolescent Hepatitis B immunization program continued at the North 
Intermediate, West Intermediate and High School. There were 497 students who 
received the series of three injections at nine immunization clinics. The 
vaccine is provided free to all Massachusetts children under 19 years of age 
through the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. There were 20 
students who received the measles, mumps and rubella immunization required 
for entry into 7th grade. Seniors at Wilmington High School received 
tetanus/diphtheria boosters and mantoux screenings for tuberculosis. 

Flu and pneumonia clinics were held in the fall. The administration of the 
vaccine was made to the homebound and Medicare Part B reimbursed the Board of 
Health the amount of $1,639.36. Three pertussis cases (whooping cough) were 
confirmed in middle school students. This respiratory disease is prevalent 
in middle and high school students. Eight blood lead tests for adults and 
children were conducted. 

The Public Health Nurse continues to participate in Community Health Network 
#15 (CHNA) sponsored by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health whose 
focus is on prevention activities around issues of domestic and youth 
violence. She also attended two conferences on immunization and influenza 
from the Center of Disease Control, and three conferences on current public 
health issues. 

A. Communicable Disease Control: 



1. Immunizations administered 74 
Office-Flu vaccinations administered 40 
Home-Flu vaccinations administered 33 
Clinic-Flu vaccinations administered 1,124 
Pneumovax administered 44 
Hepatitis B vaccinations administered 540 
Fees Collected (Medicare B) $1,639 
Flu distributed 820 

2. Communicable Diseases Reported 58 
Home Visits 

3. Tuberculosis Cases 2 
Office Visits 129 
Home Visits 2 

B . Public Health Nursing : 

1. Premature births/Newborn Report 

2. Morbidity-V.N. A. Calls/Office Visits 10 

3. General Health Supervision/Home Visits 148 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 116 
Telephone/Health Conference Calls 274 

4. Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 378 

5. Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 25 

6. Skin Screening 
Hearing and Vision 
Blood Pressure 77 
Mantoux 2 4 
Prostate 



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Senior Counseling/Drop- In Center 

Number of Sessions 

Hypertension Screenings 

Diabetic Screenings 

General Health (injections) 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screenings 

Blood Lead Testing 

Blood Analyzer Testing Clients 
Total number of tests 
Fees Collected 

Meetings 

Vaccine Distribution 
TOTAL FEES COLLECTED 



Environmental Health: 



Transport /Haulers 
Stables 

Miscellaneous permits 

Percolation testing 

Sewage system permits 

Food establishment permits 

Installers permits 

Sub-Division reviews 

Massage Therapy/Funeral Directors 

Copies 

Court witness fees 

Nurse's total fee's collected 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED 

Meetings Attended 

Disposal Works Construction Inspections 

No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 

No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 

Food Establishment Inspections 
Food Service 
Retail Food 
Residential Kitchen 
Mobile Food 

Food Establishment Re-Inspections 
Food Service 
Retail Food 
Residential Kitchen 
Mobile Food 

Nuisance Complaint Inspections 
Nuisance Complaint Re-Inspections 
Housing Inspections 



43 

729 
$25 
156 
71 

16 

19 
56 

$244 

57 
74 

$1, 908 



$3,400 
645 
2 , 018 

7 , 650 
15 ,450 

8 , 690 
2 , 900 

200 
950 
32 


1, 908 
$43, 843 
99 
306 
40 
61 



91 
19 

16 



6 
8 



47 

51 

3 



i2- 




11 . 

12 . 

13 . 

14 . 

15 . 

16 . 

17 . 

18 . 

19 . 



Housing Re - Inspections 

Percolation Tests 

Court Appearances 

Hazardous Waste Investigations 

Camp Inspections 

Miscellaneous Inspections 

Lead Inspections 

Tobacco Control Program Inspections 
Title 5 Inspection Reports Received 



4 

209 
8 
5 

79 

81 
154 



Cable T« V. Advisory Committee 



A survey was issued to residents in March to ascertain their level of 
satisfaction with the cable service provided by MediaOne. A review of 
MediaOne's compliance with the cable renewal license did not identify any 
areas of noncompliance. The Committee received 619 surveys by the deadline 
for responses. Generally, the majority of subscribers were satisfied with 
cable services and customer service. In fact, 72.4% of respondents were 
either very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the overall quality of cable 
service, while 26.5% percent were somewhat dissatisfied or very dissatisfied 
with the overall quality of cable service. 

However, according to the survey results, 69.3% of subscribers were either 
somewhat dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the price for cable 
television. Respondents also voiced concern about the discrepancy in audio 
levels between cable programming and the advertising. Thirty-six percent of 
respondents were dissatisfied with the variety of cable programming. Federal 
law does not permit the Board of Selectmen, as the licensing authority, to 
dictate or set pricing for cable services or the variety of programming. 

In September, the Cable T. V. Advisory Committee voted to recommend that the 
Selectmen approve the transfer of the cable license from MediaOne to AT&T. 
The Committee did raise concerns about the validity of the process 
established by the state for cable license transfer itself. However, 
testimony provided by AT&T at the public hearing in Burlington suggested 
that, by virtue of their size and experience in providing telephone service, 
they should have the financial, technical, legal and managerial resources to 
provide cable services of similar, if not improved quality, to that provided 
by MediaOne . 





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Sealer of Weights and Measures 

The following inspections were conducted by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures for the year 1999: 



Type of Device Number Sealed 

Deli Scales 92 

Pharmacy Weights 61 

Proper Scales 62 

Oil Truck Meters 4 

Truck Scales 9 

Gas Meters 133 

Gas Meters Advised 6 

Gas Station Observations Conducted 7 

Random Weighings 150 

Random Sign Checks 11 

Random Oil Truck Checks 6 

Consumer Complaints Acted On 3 

License Applications Delivered for State 10 

Fees Collected $2,175.00 



The job of the Sealer is to protect the consumer as well as the business. 
The Sealer's responsibilities will include scanners and maintaining cost 
savings for consumers by sealing all devices, then calculating cost savings 




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EDUCATION 




The Wilmington Public School System has been engaged in implementing a major 
improvement plan that will culminate in major changes to the educational 
program for generations to come. The School Committee, administration, 
parents, teachers, business community and citizens will witness the future of 
education unfolding in Wilmington in August, 2000 with the opening of the new 
middle school. Throughout this school year, the community can witness this 
change in the air as hundreds of construction workers transform the 
construction site at the end of Carter Lane into a state-of-the-art middle 
school . 

The School Committee has also taken action to use this construction 
opportunity to improve the overall educational program. By changing the 
grade assignments of several school buildings, students and teachers will 
experience lower class sizes and the return of specialist classroom space for 
art and music. Under the new organization of grades, one side of town will 
be served by the Boutwell for kindergarten, the Shawsheen for grades 1-3 and 
the West for grades 4 and 5. For the other side of town, Wildwood will 
reopen as a Kindergarten building in the Fall of 2000, Woburn Street will 
have grades 1-3 and the North grades 4 and 5. The administration has 
completed the process of assigning principals, teachers, and other staff 
members to the newly reconfigured schools. This complex process was based on 
decisions that were in the best interest of students and overall improvement 
of the school system. 

This year has also seen the second administration of the Massachusetts 
mandated testing program, the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System. 
This test measures how well students have mastered the knowledge and skills 
as outlined in the state Curriculum Frameworks. Results of the second 
administration in 1999 are still inconclusive to use to deduce significant 
trends, although Wilmington's results indicated that we continue to perform 
reasonably well compared to the State results. With the leadership of the 
Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Staff Development, task forces 
and study groups have been working to align the local curriculum with the 
State Frameworks . 

The Wilmington School Department continues to be aggressive about bringing in 
additional resources. This past year we were awarded several competitive 
grants totaling $194,000 from the Massachusetts Department of Education. 
These grants have enabled us to provide students who have scored poorly on 
the MCAS with after school tutoring, have supported critical professional 
development opportunities for our staff members, and have enabled us to 
supplement our technology budget for hardware, software and staff 
development. We have also benefited from the fund-raising efforts of the 
Wilmington Educational Foundation, a non-profit foundation whose Board of 
Trustees raises funds to support improvements in instructional technology. 

The community support for education is dramatically demonstrated by the new 
middle school construction project. It has been demonstrated as well in the 
support for our budget at Town Meeting each year and the collaboration of the 
many departments in town that make the effective and efficient functioning of 



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our school system possible. We are proud of the support of our mission "to 
provide a student -centered education which fosters critical inquiry enabling 
the individual to be a productive citizen, respectful of self and others, 
capable of adapting to a changing world and its technology." 




Wildcat sign at Wilmington High School — "Go Wildcats." 



As principal of Wilmington High School, I am proud to be leading us into the 
new millennium. It will be evident by the following reports that our students 
and staff are very busy working together to prepare for our accreditation 
visit in March. Committees comprised of teachers, students, parents, and 
community members have spent the last eighteen months completing reports and 
writing documents which we will be presenting to the visiting team in late 
March. We are also getting ready for our third round of MCAS testing which 
will begin in April and continue in mid May. Extra practice tests have been 
scheduled in order to better prepare our students for this year's tests. Our 
Advanced Placement students in all curriculum areas are also preparing for 
their AP examinations that will take place in May. Curriculum for the 2000- 
2001 school year is being developed so that we may begin our course selection 
process in February. We are continuing to work toward excellence in all 
areas and to ensure the safety and well being of our students and staff. 

Science Department 

There were a number of significant changes in the science department during 
1999. New courses were developed and implemented to better serve the needs 
of the student population. Integrated Science was designed to provide all 
entering freshmen with a solid foundation in physics, chemistry, earth and 
space science as part of their preparation for the 2001 administration of the 
MCAS. New textbooks and some ancillary materials were purchased to support 
the program. Advanced Placement Physics, which began during the 1998-1999 



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academic year, was joined by Advanced Placement Biology in the fall of 1999. 
Both courses were supported with grants awarded by the Department of 
Education. Part of the grant money was used to provide weeklong Advanced 
Placement Instructor training at Fitchburg State College during the summer. 
Two one-semester courses were also added in 1999 - Aquaculture and 
Biotechnology. Funds from the School -to-Career program helped to make some 
initial laboratory equipment purchases for Biotechnology while the 
Aquaculture program was awarded a grant from the New England Board of Higher 
Education via the Cat Cove Laboratory of Salem State College. 

The number of students enrolled in science for the 1999-2000 school year rose 
from 638 the previous year to 745. Although graduation requirements for 
science were increased from two years to three in response to national 
science education trends, changes in state college entrance requirements, and 
Education Reform initiatives, the increased enrollment was based solely upon 
entering freshmen. In 1999 53% of the students enrolled in science were 
female while 47% were male. 

There were two new faculty members added to the science department in 1999, a 
first year biology teacher and a fourth year veteran chemistry teacher. 

School to Career Program 

The School to Career program at the high school had a successful year with 
students participating in many activities. Students went on field trips to 
observe careers in engineering and technology at the Seabrook Nuclear Power 
station and a planned community in Marlboro. The members of our Design 2 000 
class made a visit to the Big Dig in Boston and met with civil engineers and 
architects . 

The Robotics Club met at Pacific Scientific, our business partner, and at the 
high school to learn about the design process, teamwork, and brain storming. 
The sixteen members met three to four times a month until the kick-off of the 
project. They spent the next six weeks working daily 2:00 p.m. to 11:00 
p.m., all day Saturday and some Sundays. Over 1,600 man-hours were spent on 
the design, prototype and final robot. The finished robot was sent to 
Hartford, CT. Twelve members of the club traveled to Hartford, CT to compete 
for three days in the Northeast Regional Competition. The trip proved to be 
most rewarding for everyone. The team finished the competition in 32"*^ place 
out of the 43 teams competing. All were very pleased with the outcome. 

Two students, who participated in the activities of the Robotics Club, 
received Analog Devices Scholar/ Intern Scholarships to pursue the study of 
Electrical Engineering at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. 

The internship program was successful. Thirty-two students served level 
three paid internships for the year, eight students served level one 
internships and six students in the alternative high school served paid 
internships. Three students served year long unpaid internships at WCTV. 

The job shadow program saw the members of the Tomorrow's Teachers Club shadow 
teachers in various schools for the day. Two members applied for and 
received four-year scholarships to the University of Massachusetts at 
Dartmouth. Thirty-eight juniors participated in shadow opportunities in the 
spring, while sixty-eight seniors shadowed professionals in the fall. Over 
forty Wilmington area companies responded to the need to place students with 
professionals in the student's career interest field. 



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Many of the curriculum areas such as English, fine arts, technology 
education, and science have integrated school to career activities into the 
classroom . 

English Department 

The English Department welcomes two new teachers to Wilmington High School. 
Mr. Patrick Gallagher and Miss Meghan Donahue have Master's Degrees and have 
been involved with long-term substitute positions at other local high 
schools. They have strong English backgrounds combined with experiences 
working with students in a variety of roles outside the classroom. Both 
teachers are making valuable contributions to our department. 

Also, the English Department is making changes to better align our curriculum 
with the extensive MCAS testing at Grade 10. Additional open-response 
questions are incorporated into testing situations and the department is 
preparing students for a practice MCAS long composition writing prompt to be 
administered to all Grade 9 and Grade 10 students in January. Students are 
reading a variety of new literature titles from authors recommended by the 
English Language Arts frameworks. 

Seven teachers from the Wilmington School system in the English and Social 
Studies Department participated in a grant that involved enrollment in a 
graduate course through the University of Lowell called "Literature for 
Today's Classroom." Mr. Michael Tammaro, Mr. Robert Cripps, Mrs. Nancy 
Goldman, Miss Abigail Russell, Mr. Matthew Joyce, Mr. Peter Murphy, and Mrs. 
Catherine Symonds received training in literature by authors such as Toni 
Morrison, Sandra Cisneros and Richard Rodriguez. Projects and papers 
included the development of lesson plans to introduce these authors into our 
classrooms . 

Mathematics Department 

The last school year (1998-1999) finished with the retirement of our most 
senior member, James Babcock, who had taught at the High School for 36 years. 
With his retirement and with the rising number of students enrolled in math 
classes, two new math teachers were part of the team on opening day for the 
1999-2000 school year. The mathematics department now has seven full time 
members and a curriculum team leader. 

When the decision was made to eliminate the lower level in all classes, the 
math department chose to institute a two year Algebra I course for those 
students who may need more time to master algebraic ideas and skills. The 
sequence was originally Algebra I Part A, Algebra I Part B, and then 
Geometry. After seeing the content of the MCAS exams, the department 
realized that these students would not have the necessary exposure to 
geometric concepts by the time they took the MCAS exam. For this reason the 
course sequence has been changed. Students will now take Algebra I Part A, 
Geometry, and then Algebra I Part B. We are confident that this change will 
be beneficial to the students involved. 

All of the mathematics teachers spent a portion of their summer working on 
curriculum development or taking courses to keep current in the latest 
methods . The PreCalculus course curriculum was revisited and refined by 
JoAnn Jacobson. Kathleen Bell and Virginia Blodgett started the summer by 
teaching various technology courses under the auspices of WilCUE ( Wil mington 



-88- 



Computer Using Educators) to system-wide staff. Linda Peters took part in an 
AP Calculus workshop run by the College Board Administration. Kathleen Bell 
participated in a three-day Geometer's Sketchpad workshop hosted by the 
writers of that software. Education Development Corporation (EDC) in Newton 
was the site of Gayle Masse' s three-week summer work to create and evaluate 
materials for the Math Topics class. Also during this time she wrote 
teacher's notes that will be incorporated into the materials that have been 
developed by EDC for a Math Topics textbook. These materials have been field 
tested in Mrs. Masse' s class for two years. 

Analog Devices provided a corporate mentor, John Lang, to work with Carol 
King as she develops the curriculum for the new Probability and Statistics 
course. This course is running very well and has already had a visit from 
Mr. Lang. The students were excited by his participation and enjoyed seeing 
the connection between what they do in the classroom and what actually goes 
on in industry. He did his best to answer the age-old question "When will we 
ever use this?" 

The math department is looking forward to many advances in the application of 
technology. There is now a computer lab with Internet access that may be 
used on a sign-up basis for any class in the school. Also, a new department 
member. Bill Manchester, was selected as winner of a 21^"^ Century Classroom 
grant. This grant will allow him to incorporate additional technology into 
his classes. We welcome his creative and enthusiastic spirit. 

Foreign Language Department 

"Communities" and "Cultures" are two of the five strands of the recently 
adopted Foreign Languages Framework. During the past year, WHS students were 
given several opportunities to use their language skills to participate in 
communities at home and around the world and to gain knowledge and 
understanding of other countries. 

Throughout the year, the Foreign Language Club under the direction of Miss 
Judith Nowak and Miss Karen Aruri had activities that focused on the cultural 
aspects of Foreign Language study. Each club meeting gave students an 
opportunity to become familiar with foods, music and crafts of other 
countries. In December, club members visited the Sunrise Nursing Home where 
they sang a variety of French and Spanish Christmas Carols to the community 
that lives and works there. 

In April, Mrs. Joyce Beckwith and Miss Karen Aruri organized and chaperoned a 
trip to Quebec City. Sixty WHS students had the chance to use their language 
skills as they spent four days in this "culture packed" French speaking city. 
All enjoyed the delicious French cuisine and their numerous sight-seeing 
adventures . 

Miss Ross ' French V honors class presented a French play on May 5th in the 
Barrows Auditorium. The play, which was based on the famous Asterix comic 
strips, was written, directed, and acted by French V students. Although the 
actors spoke only in French, an announcer gave periodic summaries in English. 
The initial presentation was so enjoyable that another was given during the 
school day for members of the WHS community who could not attend the night 
performance . 

In July, Miss Aruri took a group of WHS students to Spain. For ten days, 
they traveled throughout northern Spain visiting Madrid, Barcelona, Pamplona 



-89- 



and San Sebastian. As the students traveled from city to city, they were 
able to use their language skills and sample the differing ways of life in 
the communities they visited. 

French students celebrated National French week in November by going to a 
French concert in Boston and then to a French restaurant for lunch. The 
group that performed, Roc Le Roc, is a rock group form Canada. Students were 
able to learn the lyrics to many of the French songs that the group sang. 

Social Studies Department 

Once again the Social Studies Department is having a busy year. We are 
pleased to welcome Peter Arthur to the Department. Mr. Arthur comes to us 
after spending the last two years at Salem High School. He specializes in 
World History and is a very welcome addition to our staff especially in the 
light of the MCAS focus on World History. 

Members of the 2nd year of AP U.S. History class have been working diligently 
on projects for the National History Day contest to be held on March 4th. 
Their works include projects, videos, an original symphonic work and research 
papers. Fourteen of the projects will be selected to represent Wilmington at 
the competition. 

Students from Ms. Russell's Honors U.S. History classes and the first year AP 
U.S. History classes of Mrs. Goldman and Mr. Cripps have completed original 
research papers to be entered at the Phi Alpha Theta Conference held annually 
at Framingham State College. Last year the group did quite well as one of 
the entries was rated among the top ten and several received Honorable 
mention. This was from among more than 800 entries. 

A new program has been added to the extra curricular area at Wilmington High 
thanks to the efforts of Mr. Arthur. Wilmington now has a Mock Trial team 
that will be competing against numerous other schools in the region. Mr. 
Arthur is experienced in this area and had considerable success with a 
similar program at Salem High School. We are confident that his history of 
success will be continued here at Wilmington. 

The Department is working on developing the curriculum for the second year of 
the two year World History course that has been mandated by the State due to 
the MCAS testing that next years sophomores will have to pass in order to 
graduate. We feel that if the students work hard and take advantage of the 
offerings in the Social Studies Department they will be successful. 

Business Technology 

The Wilmington High School Business Technology Department enters the new 
millennium with an appreciation for the rapid pace and changing nature of 
business in the 21^*^ century. The department maintains an on-going review of 
economic activity to ensure that the curriculum and programs are structured 
in a manner that will most effectively prepare students to meet the demands 
of today's business world. With this in mind, the following courses have 
been added and updated: 

Computer Research places major emphasis on the Internet and electronic 
databases. A final report integrates this course with English, Social 
Studies and the Media Center. Students enrolled in the Computer Applications 
course will be working with concepts in Excel and Access. Desktop Web 



-90- 



Publishing will incorporate Publisher and Front Page including desktop 
publishing. Accounting and Marketing/Management along with a Junior 
Achievement program are also an integral part of our curriculum. 

Students enrolled in the Marketing/Management course have the option of 
joining DECA. DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America) gives students 
an opportunity to compete in oral and written competition in series and team 
events. The program enhances students' knowledge of marketing, management 
and entrepreneurship . Students compete with other communities in categories 
such as advertising, marketing, retail merchandising, food marketing, 
restaurant management, finance and credit. These competitions take place at 
district, state and national confarences during the course of the school 
year . 

The Business Technology Department is confident that with our current 
programs and on-going review and diligence, our students will be prepared to 
meet the technology challenges of the 21^"^ century. 




High school art students in front of the DeCordova Museum, Lincoln, MA. 



NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The North Intermediate School began the new year with an emphasis on 
improving student performance on the state MCAS tests and bringing our 
curriculum into line with the state's Curriculum Frameworks. 

Curriculum committees continually review, evaluate and suggest changes to our 
existing curriculum. An after school support program for students having 
difficulty in math and language arts is available. This program is available 
to eighth grade students to better help them prepare for the Spring MCAS 
tests. Additionally, all teachers offer an after school program for students 
that wish to remain for academic support . A late school bus provides the 
necessary transportation home for these students. 

The North Intermediate School continues to experience growth at all grade 
levels. The new Wilmington Middle School, opening in the fall of 2000, will 
provide the necessary relief needed in classroom space and class size. The 
North and West Schools are focused on transitioning to the new Wilmington 
Middle School . 



In addition to improving curriculum standards we are also making changes in 
our staff and organizational pattern for the new middle school. We are 
sensitive to the needs of our students and parents and plan to transition all 
parties to the new school as effectively as is possible. 

The North and West Intermediate Schools have combined their Parent Advisory- 
Committees and their School Advisory Committees into a single unit 
representing the middle school community. Joint school faculty meetings are 
being held to discuss transition plans for the new school and to acquaint 
teachers with their prospective partners come the fall. 

Middle School students remain torn between their emotional, physical and 
academic growth. It is a period of great change in almost all of our 
students. School dances, the art club, newspaper club, student council, and 
year book clubs remain our most popular activities. It is hoped that a new 
Middle School will also produce a wider array of after school programs in the 
near future . 

Other successful activities include DARE, Select Chorus, Odyssey of the Mind, 
Junior National Honor Society, Field Trips and the Grade 8 Trip to 
Washington, D.C. 

The North Intermediate School provides each child with an education, which 
will help to develop his/her abilities and capabilities. The main outcome 
for our students should be a strong academic foundation of language and math 
skills, critical thinking, reasoning and problem-solving skills, and knowing 
how to learn based on their multiple intelligence. Self-esteem building, 
respect and love of learning are necessary components of the educational day. 
Both self-esteem and academic achievement are interactive: self-esteem 
enables perseverance and academic success; academic success enhances self- 
esteem . 

WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The West Intermediate School is a 461-student school comprised of grades 6, 
7, and 8. There are 41 professional staff members, including a full-time 
librarian and guidance counselor and a part-time school psychologist. This 
year we have implemented an alternative education classroom for students with 
behavioral/emotional issues that hinder success in mainstream classes. 
Teachers are involved in a variety of professional development opportunities, 
including coursework, training, and conference participation. Via grant 
funding West teachers are serving as mentors to new teachers, participating 
in a State network of mathematics and science educators, and implementing 
model technology and writing programs. 

The staff members of the West Intermediate School are committed to serving as 
models of team work, as well as life-long learners. Teachers have common 
planning time and meet at least once per week as grade level or specialist 
teams. Specialist areas include media, technology literacy, physical 
education, health, music, art and technology education. Issues of school 
climate and increased student achievement are being addressed through the 
implementation of the Turning Points Principles, a set of recommendations 
based on research of effective middle schools. These recommendations call 
for greater teacher, parent and student input in the decision-making process 
and establishment of a Leadership Team to address concerns and ideas from the 
faculty. Both the North and the West Intermediate Schools were the 



-92- 



1 



recipients of State grants to proceed with the planning and implementation of 
the Turning Points report. 

Students at the West participate in a wide variety of co-curricular 
experiences. There is an activity period twice per week, which allows 
students to select an area of interest such as chorus, band, strings, 
computers, "Games That Make You Think," "Reading for Pleasure," "Current 
Events" and video production club. There is also a peer mediation program 
which enables trained student mediators, under the supervision of a teacher 
coordinator, to work with students to resolve conflicts in a positive manner. 
Students may join after-school sports, aerobics, student government, dance 
committees, yearbook, variety show, cable television club, student newspaper, 
homework club, mathematics club. Model United Nations and the like. Grant 
funding has enabled us to establish an after school MCAS preparation program. 
Youngsters participate in field trips throughout the year, which afford them 
additional "hands-on" experiences and the opportunity to use the resources of 
Wilmington, Boston and other communities. Such trips include visits to local 
art galleries, museums and theaters, a one-day trip to New York City, which 
is the culminating event of the eighth grade study of immigration and a four- 
day trip to Washington, D.C. for eighth graders, as well. 

Academic achievement is recognized through Honor Roll, membership in National 
Junior Honor Society, team awards and the President's Education Awards 
Program. Good citizenship is recognized through the P.R.I.D.E. and Student 
of the Month Programs. Presidential Fitness awards are received by those who 
meet established criteria. This year staff members have been mailing home 
"positive postcards" to parents, as well. 

The West Intermediate School has implemented flexible scheduling for 
specialists and has established smaller teaching teams for sixth graders, as 
well as flexible scheduling, to help ease the transition between elementary 
and middle school. In the fall of 2000 the West Intermediate School will 
merge with the North Intermediate School in a new facility. Construction of 
the new school began in December of 1998. In preparation for the merger, the 
two schools have combined the Parent Advisory Councils, the School Advisory 
Councils, the Leadership Teams and have held joint staff meetings. Student 
councils from both schools are beginning to work together; the councils, as 
well as the staffs, will be meeting to plan activities to bring students from 
the schools together before the beginning of the 2000-2001 school year. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen Elementary School's theme for the 1999-2000 school year is 
"Manners Matter in the Millennium." Students have been involved in a variety 
of activities to support this theme. Through journal writings, drawings, 
role playing and reading, students are reinforcing their practice of manners 
that are so important in strengthening their citizenship growth. Staff 
members consistently recognize the efforts of students as they demonstrate 
good manners in their daily school interactions. It is our belief that we 
need to assist students not only to maximize their learning potential, but 
their social and behavioral potential as well. In this way Shawsheen 
students have the opportunity to develop as well rounded students and 
citizens in preparation for their future roles. 



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Our fifth and fourth grade students also have opportunities to develop their 
sense of responsibility. Fifth grade students are elected to the Shawsheen 
Student Council. As members of the Student Council, the students meet weekly 
to discuss various community activities that they can sponsor including the 
running of the annual Coats, Hats, and Mittens Drive. Fifth grade students 
are selected by their teachers to be Bus and Hall Monitors to help with the 
supervision of students at dismissal time to monitor the safety of students 
as they leave the school. Sixteen fourth and fifth grade students have been 
selected by their peers to serve as peer mediators . These students have been 
participating in a three-day, rigorous training session in preparation of 
assisting their fellow students to resolve any conflicts that they 
experience . 

All of the staff of the Shawsheen School remain dedicated to helping students 
develop good reading and writing habits that will carry over into their adult 
lives. To achieve this goal students participate daily in a variety of rich 
reading and writing experiences. There are school-wide activities to support 
this goal as well, including a Family Reading Night and a Young Author's 
Night. Throughout the year several local children's authors and illustrators 
have visited the school to talk to the students about the writing and 
illustrating of their books. The staff continues to review the curriculum 
for the reading/ language arts program by participating in several district- 
wide initiatives including curriculum mapping and portfolio assessment. All 
of these activities are dedicated to helping our students develop effective 
literacy skills. 

The Shawsheen School is fortunate to have a very active Parent Advisory 
Council (PAC) committed to providing activities and resources to augment the 
students' learning experiences and to support a positive student climate. 
The PAC sponsors enrichment programs that complement the curriculum. This 
year there are five enrichment programs including Wingmasters - Birds of 
Prey/Native American Program, Celtic Music, Dance and History, Poetry in 
Motion and Rob Taylor, author of The Breach . In addition, the PAC runs 
several family social activities including a craft fair and a magic show. 
Student activities to foster a positive school climate have been conducted by 
the PAC including "Crazy Hat Day" and "Favorite Tee Shirt Day." The PAC has 
funded mini request grants for teachers, awarding money so that teachers can 
purchase resources and materials to enhance their instructional practices. 
Finally, members have conducted after-school programs including "Top Secret 
Science," a Geography Bee and a Homework Club. 

The Shawsheen School Advisory Council (SAC) has set forth a very ambitious 
School Improvement Plan. This year's plan is focused on reading, writing, 
school safety, technology, class size,, school climate, communication between 
home and school, addressing the diverse needs of students and the transition 
process. The transition process is particularly important this year since 
the Shawsheen School will change in 2000-2001 from a school serving grades 
one through five to one serving grades one through three. 

Across the grades, our students are involved in a variety of activities and 
field trips that complement the curriculum. One of our fifth grade 
classrooms continues to present a weekly school news program on WCTV. The 
fifth grade students in this classroom are responsible for writing, producing 
and videotaping daily school-wide events. 

Our fourth grade students participate in the annual science fair. Students 
are expected to conduct an investigation around a scientific question. After 



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some research, the students present their final project sharing the 
information and results of their investigation. 

Grades four and five will again experience an Outdoor Life Program at Camp 
Forty Acres. This program serves as nature's outdoor classroom for one week 
in the spring. Students participate in hands-on adventure activities 
emphasizing teamwork and cooperation. 

The third grade annually visits Odiorne State Park in the late spring as a 
conclusion to a month long science unit on organisms found in Tide Pools. 
During the trip, students accompanied by a naturalist, explore the rocky 
shoreline and comb the beach to collect live organisms to observe them. 
Through this experience the children are able to reinforce and complement 
their unit of study on organisms. 

After studying a unit on the 
Native Americans and the early 
settlers, our second graders 
journey to the Plimoth 
Plantation to gain a first-hand 
experience of what life was like 
when the Pilgrims arrived in 
America . 

Our first and second grade 
students join forces to practice 
community service. By saving 
their coins, the children 
contribute to the Toys for Tots 
program. The children 
experience an important life 
skill: the value and importance 
of giving to others who may be 
less fortunate. 

The Shawsheen School provides a 
variety of learning experiences 
that address the diverse 
learning needs of our total 
school population and help them 
to develop the skills, knowledge 
and interest necessary to become 
lifelong learners and to be 
successful and productive 
citizens . 

WILDWOOD SCHOOL 

The Wildwood School has undergone additional improvements to 
plant during this past year. A new boiler has been installed ana tne 
Department of Public Works has recently graded the play area behind the 
school and replanted grass. In addition, we are also grateful to the 
Department of Public Works for completing work on the crosswalk in front of 
the school. This helps to ensure greater safety for our students who walk to 
and from school each day. The Wildwood School is an aging facility but the 




Shawsheen school second grade students visit Plimoth Plantation. 



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improvements that have been made help to maintain a safe environment for our 
staff and students. 

The lack of a sufficient number 
of classrooms to meet the needs 
of our increased enrollment 
continues to be a concern and a 
challenge at the Wildwood School. 
The highest classroom enrollments 
are at the third grade level, due 
to the fact that we are only able 
to provide space for two 
classrooms at this level. To 
help counterbalance this 
situation, each of the two third 
grade classrooms has been 
assigned a full-time educational 
tutor. This helps to decrease 
the pupil/teacher ratio, provide 
greater assistance to individual 
students, and assist the 
classroom teacher. Each of these 
educational assistants is a 
certified teacher. 

A half-time assistant has been 
hired with funds from the Title I 
Program, which has returned to 
the Wildwood School after several 
years of ineligibility. This 
position is shared with the 
Woburn Street School . The 
Reading Recovery program is also 
a part of the services provided 
through the Title I grant. 
Welcome sign and garden at the entrance to the Wildwood School. 

An important part of this year's work at the Wildwood School is the creation 
of a Transition Committee to help facilitate the changes that will occur next 
year as a result of the reconfiguration of the Wilmington Public Schools. At 
that time the Wildwood School will become a kindergarten school and our 
present students will transfer to other facilities. Students in first, 
second and third grades will be attending school at the Woburn Street School, 
while students in grades four and five will transfer to the North 
Intermediate. The Transition Committee is working to make these changes as 
easy and as problem free as possible. We are looking forward to a smooth 
transition and to the continued success of our students. One thing that will 
assist our students in this change is the assignment of most of our staff 
members to either the Woburn Street School or the North Intermediate. This 
will provide familiarity in a new environment. 

The Wildwood School is additionally pleased to have added the Junior 
Achievement Program to its list of programs that are offered this year. 
Junior Achievement is an international nonprofit educational organization 
that is supported by businesses, foundations and individuals. The 
implementation of this program began in the fall and is headed by Junior 
Achievement staff member Nora Sheridan. She is assisted by the Wildwood 
School coordinators for this program. Nan Murphy and Jan Merlino, our third 




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grade team. This program has a 
unique delivery system which 
brings volunteer role models into 
each classroom to assist the 
teacher in educating students 
while simultaneously working to 
inspire young people to value free 
enterprise, business and economics 
in order to improve the quality of 
their lives. The Junior 
Achievement Program at the 
elementary level focuses on 
economics and the role of business 
in the family, the community, the 
nation and the world. It is 
divided into five themes, one of 
which is presented to the students 
each of the five weeks the program 
is conducted. The themes are: 
Our Families, Our Community, Our 
City, Our Region, and Our Nation. 
Each theme is designed to 
supplement the standard Social 
Studies curriculum and to better 
address the standards of the 
Economics strand of the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Education Social Studies 
Framework. The Wildwood School is 
very fortunate to be able to 
provide its students with this 
exciting program. 




Town Manager Michael A. Caira and School Superinten- 
dent Dr Geraldine O 'Donnell speak with Maria Tucker 
regarding her science project on dinosaurs — Wildwood 
School Science Fair 



The work continues with the analysis of the results of the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System received from the Department of Education. 
The staff works to use this data to improve instruction and to increase the 
level of performance achieved by our students. We were fortunate to receive 
funding from the Department of Education to provide an after school academic 
support program last spring for students who placed at the failure or needs 
improvement levels on the MCAS . This program, entitled Assisting Academic 
Achievement, was offered to students in fourth and fifth grades two 
afternoons each week during the final eleven weeks of school . We are pleased 
this program will be offered again this year. 

The Odyssey of the Mind program has also been offered to students after 
school. This program challenges students and prepares them to compete with 
students from other Massachusetts school systems. Teams are created for 
students in both the primary and the intermediate grades at the Wildwood 
School. Parent volunteers organize and staff this valuable program. 

The Wildwood School Council has developed another ambitious school 
improvement plan, which is presently being implemented. This plan is created 
from the responses to questionnaires that are completed by parents and staff 
and from discussions which take place at the monthly council meetings. The 
following recommendations are included in the current plan: 



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♦ To continue to foster an appreciation for reading at the Wildwood 
School by offering a reading incentive program and arranging for a 
visit by a known children's author 

♦ To continue to support a positive school climate by promoting the 
P.R.I.D.E. program 

♦ To continue to offer challenging opportunities for students by 
providing the "Odyssey of the Mind" program and the summer math 
booklets 

♦ To conduct a math awareness evening program for parents and students 

♦ To support our kindergarten students and parents as they transition 
from kindergarten to grade one by assigning an upper grade buddy to 
each transitioning student and by offering a forum through which 
parents are provided with an informative and interactive program 
about first grade during which they may ask questions 

♦ To support those students in classes with high enrollments by 
assigning a full-time educational tutor to each of those classrooms 

♦ To continue to make physical improvements to the school building and 
its grounds 

♦ To continue to modify the lunch period to help assure a smooth and 
efficient serving of lunch to a large number of students 

♦ To provide our students, parents and staff members with a smooth 
transition during the school year 2000-2001 by establishing a 
Transition Committee to include both parents and staff 

♦ To incorporate specific strategies to assist students in meeting the 
requirements of a standards based curriculum and maximum success on 
the MCAS 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

The Woburn Street School is a recent recipient of two "21st Century 
Classroom" Grants funded by the Department of Education. A nine thousand 
dollar grant is being used to purchase six new iMac computers and 
peripherals, two scanners, a digital camera and software. This equipment 
will enable teachers to effectively integrate technology into the Language 
Arts curriculum. As a result of this program we would envision that students 
will be able to critically read literature with an eye toward developing a 
well -written review of their book upon completion. These book reviews would 
ultimately be posted to a web page, developed by the students and made 
available for other students to access via the Internet. This project is 
beginning at Woburn Street this year and will be continued as a joint project 
linking Woburn Street with the North Intermediate during the 2000 - 2001 
school year. 



A second grant, for one thousand dollars, will be utilized to purchase 
another iMac. This computer will be used for training teachers in the use of 
the Exemplars Math Curriculum. Exemplars is a CD ROM based program that 



98- 




teachers can use to develop open-response questions in math, that are linked 
to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the MCAS . 

As a result of fund-raising efforts we were also able to purchase two multi- 
media carts. Each cart consists of an iMac computer, printer, 27-inch TV, 
VCR and scan converter. These will be used for a variety of teaching/ 
training purposes . 

Our PAC has been busy this year providing our students with some wonderful 
enrichment programs focusing on the theme, "Cultural Diversity: Tolerance and 
Acceptance." In September our students were entertained and enlightened by 
"Tony Vacca's World Rhythms." Tony's music reflects the multi-cultural 
sources of rhythm in America while playing musical instruments from around 
the world. In November, Gail Blacksnake and associates from Woodland 
Village, Center for Environmental Education, provided classroom workshops on 
Native American studies. 



During the second week in January Ms. Lucinda Landon, author/illustrator of 
the "Meg Mackintosh Mysteries" series, joined us as this year's author-in- 
residence. During her residency Ms. Landon shared her experiences as a 
children' s author and worked with students to develop their own writing and 
illustrating skills. 

We have just completed our third year of Peer Mediation Training. Eighteen 
Woburn Street students participated in this year's training along with 
students from Wildwood and Shawsheen. We are very proud of these students 
for helping us deliver the message that "In our school we can talk over our 
differences. We don't have to fight to get justice. Mediation allows us to 
attack the problem and not the person." 



BOUTWELL SCHOOL 

The Boutwell School is in it fifth year of operation serving kindergarten and 
first grade students from the Town of Wilmington. The Boutwell School 
continues to pride itself on being a student -centered educational facility, 
emphasizing individual student achievement, strong student -centered 
curriculum, family involvement and positive school climate. Staff members at 
the Boutwell School continually strive to achieve high standards and goals 
for themselves, as well as for all of our students. Seeds for learning as a 
lifelong adventure continue to be planted at the Boutwell. 

Our Parent Advisory Council shares the commitment for family involvement and 
tirelessly works with the school staff and administrators to achieve a 
positive school climate. This active and growing group of parents assists us 
in projects, which strengthen our sense of community. The PAC sponsors a 
coat and food drive during winter months. Children brought food items to be 
donated to the Wilmington Food Pantry and the school worked with Anton's 
Cleaners to provide winter coats for needy children and adults. Family Fun 
Night, an Ice Cream Smorgasbord and Teacher Appreciation Luncheon were events 
sponsored by the PAC that provided our school community with the opportunity 
to engage in social activities, strengthening school pride. Enrichment 
activities provided during the school day enhanced the language arts, reading 
and science curriculum. The children sat with rapt attention as they 
listened to storytellers, danced to music from various parts of the world and 
watched one of their schoolmates as he/she was encased in a huge bubble blown 
by a visiting scientist. 



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Safety is an important focus for staff, children and our families. Several 
programs highlight safety and good decision making for our students. 
Programs offered at the Boutwell School stress bus, bike and community safety 
and awareness. Representatives from the Police and Fire Departments come to 
meet with our students demonstrating the need for fire, bus and home safety. 
These procedures are then taken back to the classroom with follow-up 
activities and discussions. 

Literacy and reading are the cornerstones of academic success and take center 
stage in every classroom at the Boutwell. To further highlight the 
importance of literacy, we celebrate Literacy Month in November with many 
special events. Town officials, including Dr. O'Donnell, School 
Superintendent, Fire Chief Stewart, School Principals, Assistant Principals, 
and Town Librarians were just a few of the visitors who came to read and 
share their favorite stories with the children and staff. In another 
community effort, the Boutwell School participates in the state sponsored 
"Spread the Word" Program. This past year, children, staff, families and 
individuals from the Wilmington community donated children's books to the 
Boutwell, where they were collected and sorted. The State Department of 
Education then distributed the books to needy children in another community 
in the Commonwealth to take and keep at home. The Boutwell collected over 
one thousand books to be donated, giving a piece of Wilmington to children 
from another community. 

March was a spectacular month at the Boutwell. Our kindergarten children, 
along with their teachers and support staff, participated in a "Celebration 
of Wilmington" unit of study. A curriculum unit was developed by the staff 
engaging the children in various language, reading, math and art activities 
that centered on the Town of Wilmington. The children each made their 
individual houses, constructed neighborhood maps and learned about town 
landmarks, town government and people. Mr. Caira, Town Manager, met with the 
children to talk with 
them about town 
government and town 
officials. Mr. Caira 
brought aerial photos of 
the town and answered 
many interesting 
questions from the 
students . The 
culminating event of the 
unit brought our 
families to the Boutwell 
for a performance by the 
children in which they 
sang familiar songs with 
special adaptations for 
Wilmington. While the 
children sang a 
beautiful song, the 
audience was captivated 
by a slide presentation 
depicting events from 
the past year at the 
Boutwell . 




Town Manager Michael A. Caira shakes hands with a kindergarten student who knew 
that a "Town Manager" is in charge of a town — Boutwell Early Childhood Center. 



-100- 



Another goal for the staff at the Boutwell is to assist the children in 
making smooth transitions. This year we invited Wilmington Preschool classes 
throughout the town to schedule visits to the Boutwell School. 

The kindergarten children visited their receiving school in Wilmington and 
our first grade students made a special visit to their second grade 
classrooms at the Shawsheen School in the spring. During this time, the 
entire school community works together to be sure the children have a 
successful completion to their year at the Boutwell School and a smooth 
beginning to the year ahead. 

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT: KINDERGARTEN TO 12th GRADE 

The Fine Arts Department continues to serve the whole of the Wilmington 
School population. Kindergarten students receive instruction weekly for one- 
half hour while every elementary grade receives weekly forty-five minute 
classes. The middle school schedule has continued with ninety-minute classes 
daily for a six-week period. This allows for intensive instruction necessary 
for this age group. The high school curriculum offers Art I/II, III/IV and 
Portfolio, Drawing and Painting as well as Advanced Placement. The popular 
Photography classes of Photography I, II, III and IV, Animation and Video are 
also offered. 

The Performing and Fine Arts Framework was approved by the State Board of 
Education in October of 1999. This has facilitated the ongoing restructuring 
of the K-12 Fine Arts Curriculum. The Elementary Art teachers did two 
workshop days constructing the elementary curriculum and lining it up with 
the Frameworks . At this point we also have a Middle School curriculum 
outline which will be the next step in our new curriculum. This scope and 
sequence approach and adherence to the Frameworks insures a comprehensive and 
structured program for our students . 

Field trips are conducted at all levels. Karen Larrabee took some of her 
classes at the Woburn Street School to see the collection at the Peabody 
Museum of Art in Salem. Phyllis Beinart has established a connection with 
the Addison Gallery in Andover and frequently takes students for showings 
through the year. High school students visited the Galleries on Newbury 
Street in the spring and advanced students toured the Scott Prior Show and 
the Sculpture Park at the Decordova Museum in the fall. 

Ian Thomas in Photography and Duong Tran in Ceramics were awarded Honorable 
Mention prizes in the 1999 Scholastic Art Awards program. Laura Winn and 
Duong Tran received fours and Alicia Kendal a two in their Advanced Placement 
Portfolio submissions to the College Board. We continue to have our students 
further their studies at state and private schools within and outside the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Parents and students have continued to be pleased at the continuing art work 
showing at the Roman House. Letters of congratulations are sent home to 
those students whose work is selected, inviting them to view their displayed 
pieces . 



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SPECIAL EDUCATION 



During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 200 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 607 special needs students ages 
3-22 . 

The Special Education program received a state grant for developing 
strategies to better meet unique learning styles of special needs students 
under the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks Learning Standards. Mindful 
that the- School Department was providing training for teachers in aligning 
our local curriculum with the State's standards, the Special Education 
program channeled these grant monies into the process of curriculum alignment 
by providing training slots for Special Education teachers to be involved. 
The goal was to develop instructional strategies that recognize the unique 
learning styles of special needs students and to implement effective 
instructional practices for disabled students within the State Frameworks. 

The Special Education Program has worked closely with Mr. Edward Woods, High 
School Principal and Ms. Suzanne Garfield, Principal at the West Intermediate 
to expand our alternative program for special needs students. Specifically, 
the high school developed a night alternative program to address the needs of 
high risk students from dropping out of school, while the middle school 
provided a day alternative program to address behavioral management and 
discipline related issues. The program located at the West Intermediate 
School serves both middle schools. 

Both of these new alternative programs, coupled with the high school's day 
alternative program, significantly expands the School Department's capacity 
to address the needs of high risk students at the middle school and high 
school level . 




Wilmington High School Marching Band — Memorial Day Parade. 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION & ATHLETICS 



The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students {K-12) as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. 

The Elementary Health Program once again has incorporated "Project Charlie" 
into the curriculum. In Grade 5, we continue to offer the DARE Program, in 
cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and Officer Chip Bruce. 
These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol education through 
teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision making. A Scholastic 
Science program has been added for all grade levels to enhance the existing 
health curriculum. 



The new 

Physical 
Education 
Curriculum at 
the High 
School, Health 
Dynamics, is a 
comprehens ive 
program dealing 
with health, 
fitness and 
life skills. 
Students 
examine 
appropriate 
health topics 
including 
substance 
abuse , 
nutrition, 
physical 

fitness, human sexuality, mental health and stress management. The 
curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, consumer issues, 
ecology and social issues in the program. Related physical activities 
designed to reinforce health issues are offered to ensure a complete holistic 
sense of mental, spiritual and physical well being. 




Biunberg Road Race — "Ready, Set . 



The High School Physical Education and Health Department has added a Lifelong 
Fitness Elective Course for Grades 11 and 12 . Students participate in 
activities that will maintain and enhance their personal physical fitness 
levels. Cardiovascular fitness training, individual sports and highly 
competitive traditional games have beer, stressed. 

The Physical Education Department cited several students for Outstanding 
Achievement in Physical Education for 1999: 

Academic Excellence A\s"ards -.sere presented to the follow^ing students: 



Class of 2000 
Class of 2001 
Class of 2002 



Patrick Heffernan and Kristen Kacamburas 
David Hanley and Kimberly Gillespie 
Jacob Watroba and Lisa Antonangeli 



Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 

Scott Buck, Christopher Calway, Layna Dakin, Diane Dellascio, James Fennelly, 
John Gillis, Sarah Lund, Felicia Newhouse, Sean Quigley, Stefany Quinton, 
James Rourke and Rebecca Rufo 

Outstanding Effort Awards were presented to the following athletes: 

Paul DeGennaro, Eric Farrell, Denise Merry, Gregory Monteiro and Colleen 
Murphy 

President's Challenge Award Winners: 

Class of 1999: Peter Bamberg, Paul Cheney, Mark DiGiovanni, Chet Ferriera, 

Peter Grasso, Lauren Holloway, Adrienne Huynh, Daniel Sweet 
and Laura Winn 

Class of 2000: Lauren Allaby, Jeffrey Coughlin, Layna Dakin, Jason 

Frongillo, Jay Gillis, Michael Heffernan, Patrick 
Heffernan, Lynn Hurley, Kristen Kacamburas, Alica Longo, 
Nicole Maclver, Lauren McCarthy, Arlene Moscufo, Sean 
Quigley, James Rourke and Barbara Tate 

Class of 2001: Scott Buck, Christopher Calway, Justin Cammarata, James 

Fennelly, Robert French, Kim Gillespie, Andrew Hackett, 
David Hanley, Joshua Hiltz, Mark Jepson, Felicia Newhouse, 
Joseph Ranno, Marc Sollazzo and Lori Vachon 

Class of 2002: Lisa Antonangeli, Diane Dellascio, Christopher Minghella 

and Stephanie Quinton 

Athletic Awards/Recipients: 

• Dr. Gerald Fagan Award: "To the Most Outstanding Wilmington High School 
Senior Athlete:" Laura Winn and Justin Vallas 

• Lawrence H. Gushing, Sr. Award: "To the Senior Demonstrating 
Sportsmanship, Scholarship and Athletic Ability:" Amanda Lojek and Mark 
DiGiovanni 

• Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award: "To the Senior Athlete Demonstrating 
Dedication to Athletics at Wilmington High School:" Emily King and Matt 
Kacamburas 

• Joseph H. Woods Jr. Memorial: "To the Senior Athlete Demonstrating 
Courage, Discipline and Tenacity while attending Wilmington High School:" 
Kara Irving and Dennis Ingram 

• Jack Smith Award: "To a Senior Athlete Demonstrating Commitment to 
Athletics:" Peter Bamberg 



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championships : 



The 1998/1999 Ice Hockey Team, coached by Steve Scanlon, won the CAL 
Championship. Coach Steve Scanlon was selected Lowell Sun Coach of the Year. 
Girls' Basketball Coach Beth Livermore was voted Coach of the Year in the 
Cape Ann League. The 1999 Golf Team, coached by Al Fessenden, won the CAL 
Championship. The 1999 Football Team, coached by Bob Almeida, won the CAL 
Co-Championship . 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Wilmington School Food Service employs fourteen full-time staff members and 
sixteen part-time. We are a self-supporting department within the School 
Department. All salaries, including the Director's and Secretary's, food 
purchases, equipment and most maintenance as well as office supplies are paid 
from student lunch participation, reimbursement from the Department of 
Education, catering functions such as National Honor Society Banquets, 
luncheons, coffee hours. Senior Citizen Lunch Program, Extended Day Care 
Program and any other programs that allow us to cater and put these monies 
back into the program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture food based menus. 
We have upgraded our computer system to provide us with a more up-to-date 
accounting system. We will investigate available software to continue to 
keep us in the forefront of food service. 

We offer students many lunch choices to encourage participation at the 
reasonable price of $1.25. We served 336,690 student meals and 18,954 senior 
citizen meals this year. We have conducted several pilot programs to bring 
new ideas and products into school food service. 

We are in the process of updating the cafeterias in the schools to make the 
environment more pleasant and upbeat . We hope to have them completed to 
coincide with the opening of the new middle school. 

With our new snack bar in the high school we've expanded our services to 
include athletic events when possible. 

We once again participated in Framingham State College's graduate Intern 
Program. A student intern studied under Wilmington School Food Service 
Program. With this assistance, we are able to do surveys of our program and 
continue to upgrade services to the students and staff. It is an enriching 
experience for all of us. 

Due to the building of the new Middle School, we will be repositioning staff 
again and possibly hiring additional staff. 

At present there are twenty-eight National Restaurant Association certified 
sanitarians on staff. The hope is to have all staff certified. We continue 
to train our staff in sanitation, safety, CPR and Heimlich Maneuver. 

The Senior Citizen Lunch Program continues to be supportive of our senior 
population. Contact the Senior Drop-In Center if you are in need of meals- 
on-wheels or would like to come for lunch at the high school. 

We are always striving to improve our services to the students and community 
and are happy to respond to any suggestions and request when possible. 



■105- 



PERSONNEL 



The following people retired from the Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Mr. James Babcock, teacher at Wilmington High School; Mrs. Dorothy 
Walsh, teacher at the Shawsheen Elementary School; Mrs. Irene Keating, 
teacher at the Shawsheen Elementary School; Mrs. Audrey Riddle, Secretary at 
the Shawsheen Elementary School; Mr. John Murphy, teacher at the West 
Intermediate School; Mrs. Anna Simmons, teacher at the West Intermediate 
School, Mrs. Annette Curley, guidance counselor at Wilmington High School; 
and Mr. Richard Scanlon, teacher at Wilmington High School. The Wilmington 
school community wishes to thank these people for their many years of 
dedicated service to the children of Wilmington and wishes them many happy 
and healthful retirement years. 

In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, support staff, parents and 
students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools 
during the 1998-1999 school year. A special note of thanks to the many town 
departments that cooperated with the school system in 1999. 




The Shawsheen Valley Technical High School District is pleased to submit its 
1999 Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, 
Tewksbury, and Wilmington. Located on Cook Street in Billerica next to the 
Towns of Burlington and Wilmington, we celebrated our 30"^*^ anniversary 
offering quality vocational technical education to area youth and residents. 

The District is governed by a ten member elected School Committee empowered 
by the Massachusetts General Laws and by a Regional Agreement between the 
five member towns. Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee 
include: Mark Trifiro and Don Drouin from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice 
Chairman, and Bernard F. Hoar, Treasurer, from Billerica; John P. Miller, 
Chairman, and Alfred Verrier from Burlington; J. Peter Downing and Patricia 
W. Meuse from Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis, Secretary, and Robert G. 
Peterson from Wilmington. Charles Lyons is Superintendent/Director of the 
District serving in that capacity since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School is one of twenty-six regional 
vocational technical school districts in Massachusetts. Eleven hundred and 
thirty-five high school students were enrolled in Shawsheen Tech's day school 
programs in October of 1999. Over eight hundred adults also participated in 
Shawsheen Tech's adult and continuing education courses. Shawsheen Tech's 
comprehensive adult education program is the fifth largest in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The high school graduating class of 1999 numbered two hundred forty-five 
seniors. Sixty-five percent of the class graduates secured employment 
immediately after graduation in their chosen profession; thirty-one percent 
elected to pursue further education in post secondary institutions; and two 
percent joined the armed services. The placement statistics for this class 
are among the highest of the twenty- five other regional vocational technical 
schools located in the Commonwealth. 



-106- 



Shawsheen Tech has articulation agreements with fifteen area colleges, all of 
whom grant students college credit for the work they complete during high 
school. Known as the "Tech Prep" program, this unique approach further 
develops career paths for high school students, maximizes student interest to 
obtain advanced degrees in emerging technical areas and assures students a 
career educational path that is both relevant and rewarding. Industry- 
leaders and educational professionals throughout the United States have 
applauded and emulated Shawsheen' s "Tech Prep" program. 

In addition to the aforementioned, Shawsheen expanded its partnership with 
area institutions in 1999 by developing a dual enrollment program with 
Middlesex Community College. Underwritten by the Department of Education, 
this program allows students to receive both high school and college credit 
for after school courses taken ac Middlesex Community College in Bedford, MA. 
Sixteen upper-class students have taken foreign language courses at Middlesex 
Community College. 

Committed to Student Interests and Special Talents 

Three hundred and twenty out of three hundred and seventy ninth-grade 
applicants entered Shawsheen Tech last fall as inquisitive learners. 
Interest in attending Shawsheen Tech is so high, that the school found it 
necessary to establish a waiting list of students for the first time in a 
decade. Upon entering Shawsheen, students spend every other week 
experiencing and exploring fourteen different vocational/technical 
occupations. With nineteen different programs to select from, parents and 
students are entitled to choose eight of the fourteen areas they are 
scheduled to explore. Students spend alternate weeks in academic classes. 
By eliminating study halls and providing a challenging eight-period school 
day, the school offers students all academic requirements for college 
entrance into any college of their choice and, at the same time, trains them 
as technicians or craftsmen. 

By April of their freshmen year, students select a vocational/technical 
profession in which they will major for the next three and a quarter years. 
Those who select Plumbing or Electrical will earn fifteen hundred hours 
towards a journeyman's license prior to graduating from high school. Those 
who select Cosmetology will acquire the thousand-hour trade experience needed 
to take the state examination. Program offerings range from Health Careers 
to Electronics; from Telecommunications to Culinary Arts; and from Graphic 
Arts to Welding. The public is invited to contact the Guidance Department at 
(978) 671-3613 for a catalog of Shawsheen' s diverse program offerings. 

By the fall of their senior year many students begin initial employment as 
either apprentices or co-op interns with local companies during their shop 
week. Over two hundred and fifty area businesspersons serve on Shawsheen' s 
Craft Advisory Committees ensuring our curriculum, content and technology are 
up to date. Meeting twice each year with Shawsheen administrators, these 
local businesspersons are among the first to hire graduates from programs 
that they have had a part in developing. 

Shawsheen students participate in a wide variety of extra curricular 
activities such as the National Honor Society, the School Yearbook, the 
Student Newspaper, the World Wide Web Club and the Student Council. The 
Vocational Industrial Club of America, known as VICA, represents the largest 
population of student involvement at Shawsheen. VICA is a co-curricular 
activity, providing opportunities for students to showcase their vocational 



-107- 



technical skills at local, state, national and international competitions. 
Fourteen students participated in the national competition in Kansas City in 
late June of 1999. 

Three hundred and forty Shawsheen students participated in interscholastic 
athletics, capturing state vocational championships in both cross-country and 
wrestling. The football cheerleading team won the Commonwealth Athletic 
Conference Championship, as well as the Division II North State title. The 
basketball cheerleading team also earned the Division II North title. The 
ice hockey and softball teams both qualified for state tournament play. On 
an individual basis, Robert Cassidy won the Division I State Wresting title 
at 13 pounds and was named the Outstanding Wrestler at the Vocational State 
Wrestling Tournament. Robert Cassidy has also received notice of early 
acceptance at Penn State University. 

Although the MCAS scores of Shawsheen tenth graders were below the state 
average in 1998 and 1999, this school has aggressively reviewed and revised 
its academic and vocational programs, to align all learning outcomes with 
state expectations. Learning deficiencies of individual students are 
identified prior to the beginning of the freshman year. Students in need of 
remediation and special accommodations are placed in appropriate classes with 
Massachusetts certified specialists ready to serve their individual needs. 
During the 1998-1999 school year, an additional mathematics teacher was 
hired to reduce the student -teacher ratios in all ninth and tenth grade math 
classes. Expansion of remedial reading, writing and mathematics services has 
been further enhanced by the addition of computer application programs 
supported by extensive staff training. Efforts to reinforce basic academic 
skills across all academic and vocational programs have become a school -wide 
focus of school improvement. Because of the natural correlation between 
academic science programs and vocational technical programs, new science 
courses and state of the art science laboratories have been added. 

Shawsheen continues to assess individual learning progress internally through 
the administration of standardized testing, final examinations and 
performance assessments . Shawsheen leads the way in advocating for a 
national assessment that will recognize the attainment of occupational 
knowledge and skills. Members of the school leadership team are actively 
engaged in the creation of occupational -prof iciency and occupational -mastery 
standards that will provide evidence of learning progress and the graduation 
eligibility for students enrolled in vocational technical schools. 

The School Council, co-chaired by Assistant Superintendent -Director/Principal 
Robert Cunningham and parent Bonny Smith, met and fulfilled its 
responsibilities in regard to Educational Reform Act enacted into law by the 
Massachusetts Legislature in 1993 . The Council approved a School Improvement 
Plan, revisited the Student Handbook suggesting changes in the discipline 
policy; and approved the school budget prior to submission to the School 
Committee. Plans for a school store have progressed, and parent volunteers 
have agreed to work during school lunches to assist in its implementation. 
We anticipate the store will open at the beginning of 2000. 



-108- 



Special Activities in 1999 

Many activities took place during 1999 that deserve special recognition: 

♦ In order to promote attention to general student and staff wellness, the 
weight room above the gymnasium was transformed into a beautiful new 
Health/Wellness Center equipped with strength-building equipment and 
cardiovascular machines. This area is now a vibrant instructional 
facility used extensively during the school day. Activities in the new 
Health/Wellness Center will be expanded into after school and vacation 
hours to serve Shawsheen Tech students and staff. 

♦ At the Annual Scholarship and Awards night, seventy-nine seniors received 
either scholarships for further education or awards for tool and equipment 
purchases in recognition of their outstanding efforts in their academic 
and technical studies. Community organizations continued their spirit of 
generosity in providing substantial scholarship assistance to Shawsheen 
graduates . 

♦ Two seniors received Presidential Scholar's awards from the University of 
Massachusetts providing full four-year scholarships at that institution. 
Another senior received the Presidential Scholar's award from Newbury 
College . 

♦ The Computer Services Department upgraded a new switched network with 
2,000 times the output of the previous one, switched the student 
administrative functions to a modern graphical system, implemented an 
automated reporting system, performed Y2K updates on all network equipment 
and computers and installed an integrated messaging system by tying our 
new phone system to our computer systems. 

♦ The Millennium 2000 is, indeed, the Information Age, driven by the 
Internet. Information can be shared globally at any time of the day. The 
educational implications are significant. Students must now be trained to 
use the tools of this technology. Again, Shawsheen Tech is in the 
forefront. Members of this school's English Program have devised 
curriculum on multimedia, interactive web pages, which students access 
daily in their classroom. In another English Department setting, students 
are networked within the classroom and to the World Wide Web. They 
operate like a web-to-web business within the classroom, assuming specific 
management roles. The students operate the business and report to their 
peers daily. This type of structured communication has nurtured 
significant growth in students' writing ability as measured by the 1999 
MCAS English Language Arts test, and it has contributed to significant 
increases in students' reading comprehension scores as measured by 
nationally standardized tests. 

♦ The School District was fortunate to promote Ms. Barbara Ahern as the new 
Director of Vocational/Technical Programs. Ms. Ahern replaced Mr. Anthony 
Bazzinotti who served the District for nearly thirty years in a most 
professional manner. Shawsheen Tech's outstanding reputation as a pioneer 
in vocational education can be directly attributed to Mr. Bazzinotti 's 
stewardship. He will be sorely missed. 



-109- 



♦ Shawsheen Tech is viewed as a national leader in integrating technology as 
a teaching tool in the classroom for our students. Ms. Margarida Mello 
and Ms. Leah Marquis' on-line Crucible project was judged by the United 
States Teachers of English Association as one of the most outstanding and 
innovative English programs on the Internet. Their presentation of the 
project in Denver, Colorado to four hundred English teachers from around 
the world was well received and followed by an invitation to publish their 
program in the National English Magazine in March, 2000. 

♦ Shawsheen Tech was pre-eminent among seventy-two schools in Massachusetts 
who developed a Summer Tutorial Program assigned to assist students in 
improving their MCAS results. Seventy comprehensive schools and two 
technical schools were funded for this program during the summer of 1999. 
Shawsheen Tech selected fifty students from the five-town district and 
taught them mathematics through integration. Of all of the funded 
programs, Shawsheen recorded the highest student attendance and the 
highest pre-test/post- test gains in standardized mathematics test scores. 
The Massachusetts Department of Education invited the Shawsheen Summer 
Tutorial staff to present the model program at the State Palm Program for 
Math and Science Teachers. 

♦ By expanding its technology growth, Shawsheen embarked on several new 
paths to improve service to students . The school entered into an 
agreement with 3 -COM, a national network services provider company who 
trained, certified and provided technical support to Shawsheen instructors 
in local area network design. Some of Shawsheen' s graduating seniors from 
the Internet Technology Program will be Industry Certified as Local Area 
Network Managers. These Shawsheen graduates will enter the work force 
capable of designing and managing network systems for local businesses. 

♦ Our Business Technology Department now has five Microsoft Certified 
Instructors. During the past year, Shawsheen Tech received three 
performance grants as a Lighthouse Technology School and provided 
assistance and training to educators from other schools. 

♦ During the 1999 School Year the Massachusetts Department of Education 
awarded Shawsheen Tech three Lighthouse Technology School Grants. 
Shawsheen Tech was selected for its advanced application of using the 
Internet as a teaching tool in the classroom. Shawsheen Tech staff 
presented at conferences and held training sessions for teachers across 
Massachusetts on how to integrate technology as a teaching tool for 
students . 

Community Projects 

Examples of numerous community projects completed by Shawsheen Tech are as 
follows: 

♦ Shawsheen Tech's Masonry/Carpentry students built a new storage shed (28' 
X 120') complete with five bay doors on the Shawsheen campus. 

♦ The Masonry Department completed a 30' x 30' two car garage/storage shed 
at Tewksbury' s football field. 



-110- 



♦ The Construction Trades Cluster completed a new house project in 
Wilmington . 

♦ The Graphic Arts curriculum was enhanced to produce "Print on Demand" , 
which is state-of-the-art in the industry. Each year Shawsheen produces 
many publications at minimal charge for municipal and non-profit 
organizations . 

♦ Shawsheen' s student supported web site expanded to more than one thousand 
pages. Residents are encouraged to view our web site at 

www . shawsheen . tec . ma . us 

♦ Masonry students competed in the statewide Masonry Knowledge Bowl at 
Greater Lowell Technical High School and captured first place. 

♦ The District continued to provide extensive computer training in new 
software applications to municipal employees at no charge to member towns. 

Conclusion and Acknowledgement 

The Shawsheen Valley Technical High School District School Committee, staff, 
and students gratefully appreciate the support it receives from the residents 
of the five member communities. The Shawsheen family especially thanks the 
local Town Managers, Finance Committees and Town Meetings for their continued 
financial support, ensuring the highest quality in vocational technical 
training opportunities for area youth. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning & Conservation Department 

The department provides a high level of service to the community in the areas 
of planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other community 
development activities . The department provides staff support to the 
Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Housing Partnership, Open Space and 
Recreation Plan Committee and Master Plan Committee. The Planning Board is 
responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control Act and Site Plan 
Review, recommendations on zoning amendments and specific planning studies. 
The Conservation Commission is responsible for wetlands protection in 
accordance with the State Wetlands Prptection Act. The goal of the Housing 
Partnership is to provide affordable housing for Wilmington residents through 
local initiatives and partnerships with private developers. The activities 
of each board are described in more detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

1. To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board in its review of 
subdivision and site plans. 

2 . To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 

administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act. 



3 . To provide coordinated review of development plans through the 
Community Development Technical Review team. 

4. To provide assistance and information to residents. 

5 . To complete the Master Plan and undertake other strategic planning 
efforts, as applicable. 

6. To revise the zoning by-laws and zoning map to enhance the character of 
the town, consistent with the master planning effort. 

7. To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development, consistent 
with the master planning effort. 

8 . To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes . 

9. To promote environmental awareness and education. 

10. To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership, including 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, monitoring 
of on-going developments and review of projects sponsored by 
developers . 

11. To develop and implement community development programs, including the 
Community Development Block Grant Program. 

12. To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various state 
and regional forums . 

The Director of Planning & Conservation Director is Lynn Goonin Duncan. She 
staffs the Planning Board, Housing Partnership and Master Plan Committee and 
chairs the Community Development Technical Review Team. The Director also 
serves as the representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) , 
the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning 
Council (NSPC) , acting as the liaison between the town and the state on 
transportation and planning issues. 

John Keeley serves as Assistant Director of Planning and Conservation and 
provides technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the 
department. Senior Clerks Linda Reed and Joann Roberto provide secretarial 
support . 

Community Development Program 

The town was recently awarded a CDBG grant in the amount of $573,365 for a 
town-wide housing rehabilitation program. Funds will be available to assist 
income-eligible residents for home improvements, such as electrical work, new 
furnaces, roof repairs, structural work, and septic system repair. The 
program is slated to start early in 2000. The goal of the program is to 
upgrade 27 substandard dwellings. This is the first time that funds for 
housing rehabilitation will be available on a town-wide basis, and not 
limited to a specific neighborhood as in previous grants. 

Since 1991 the town has been awarded almost $2 million dollars in CDBG 
funding, a significant achievement given the extremely competitive nature of 
the grant and the economic health of the community. 



-112- 



The Planning for Growth project is funded through the Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs (EOEA) . It is a joint planning effort with the Towns 
of Reading, North Reading, Burlington and the Ipswich River Watershed 
Association. The project will address growth planning and watershed 
management and include development of a subregional growth policy plan. The 
steering committee, comprised of representatives from the four towns, the 
Ipswich River Watershed Association, EOEA, and the Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council, has been meeting on a monthly basis to provide project direction. 



Planning Board 

The responsibilities 
of the Planning 
Board include review 
of subdivision plans 
and "Approval Not 
Required" lots; 
review of commercial 
and industrial site 
plans ; 

recommendations to 
the Board of Appeals 
on variances and 
special permits; and 
strategic and 
comprehens ive 
planning . 

Subdivision activity 
was very modest with 
the submittal of 




only two definitive Construction continues at a steady rate in Wilmington. 
subdivision plans 
with a total of 

three lots, in comparison with a total of five definitive subdivision plans 
totaling thirteen lots in 1998. However, the level of commercial and 
industrial activity remained at a high level, comparable to 1998, as 
indicated by the number of site plan review applications for commercial and 
industrial projects. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five-year 
terms. Planning Board members serving full terms in 1999 were James Diorio, 
Scott Garrant , Richard Green and Kevin Brander. Carole Hamilton resigned 
after many years of dedicated service and inspired leadership. Michael 
Sorrentino was appointed to fill the vacated seat. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed the following subdivision 
plans : 



-114- 



Subdivision 



Number 
of Lots 



Action 



Fenway Street 
Tanner Road & 



1 



Approved with conditions 



Wirth Avenue 



Greenville Street 



2 
1 



Pending 
Pending 



Subdivisions under construction during the course of the year included 
Andover Heights, Country Oaks, Evergreen Estates, Laurel Woods, White Pines 
Crossing, Foley Farm Estates, Emerald Woods and Marion Estates IV. 

Streets accepted at the 1999 Annual Town Meeting were Aspen Drive, Avon 
Street, Bailey Road, Birch Road, Cherokee Lane, Elizabeth Drive, Faulkner 
Avenue, Serenoa Lane and Wakefield Avenue. 

Of the twenty- four (24) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans that were 
submitted, the Planning Board determined that 22 plans did not require 
approval under the Subdivision Control Law and were endorsed; one (1) plan 
was denied; and one is pending. 

Site Plan Review 

There were twenty-one (21) Site Plan Review applications for commercial and 
industrial property. The Planning Board approved eighteen (18) with 
conditions; two were withdrawn; and one is pending. Noteworthy was the 
denial of the site plan for the proposed MBTA commuter parking lot in the 
Town Center. However, the MBTA has stated that the agency is exempt from 
local Site Plan Review. 



In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings 
included in this annual report. 

Conservation Commission 

The Commission was busy in 1999, reviewing 58 notice of intent applications. 
Requests for determination of applicability declined as a result of a newly 
streamlined permitting process for minor projects in the outer wetland 
"buffer zone". There were 231 public hearings/meetings held to review these 
applications and those filed at the end of 1998. 



Zoning 



The primary- 
responsibility 
of the 

Conservation 
Commission is 
the admin- 
istration and 
enforcement of 
the 

Massachusetts 
Wetlands 
Protection Act 
(M.G.L. Chapter 
131, Section 40) 
and its 

regulations (310 
CMR 10.00) , 
which regulate 
all activity 
within any 
wetland resource 

Autumn view of Silver Lake — Wilmington's Great Pond. area or the 10 

foot buffer zone 

of wetlands. Wetland resource areas include bordering vegetated wetland 
(swamps, marshes, etc.), banks and land under water bodies, bordering land 
subject to flooding (floodplain) and riverfront zone. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three -year terms by the Town 
Manager. Citizens serving on the Commission in 1999 were: James Morris - 
Chairperson, Judith Waterhouse - Vice Chairperson, Richard Patterson, Lisa 
Brothers, Jolene Lewis, Mark Brazell and Derek Fullerton. 

Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations, or filing procedures can 
be directed to John Keeley, Assistant Director of Planning and Conservation. 

Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected $8,402.00 

Notices of Intent Filed 58 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 70 

Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 231 

Extension Permits Issued/Denied 3/0 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Violation Notices Issued 13 

Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 42/0 

Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 11/0 

Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 52/7/11 

Emergency Certifications Issued 15 

Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 13/0 

Negative Determination 57 

Positive Determination/Withdrawn/Pending 13/1/1 

Request for Amendments/Issued/Withdrawn 0/0/0 




-116- 



Notice of Intent 



DEP 


# 


APPLICANT 


LOCATION 


MAP/ PARCEL 


DECISION 


344 


-635 


ETM Realty Trust 


2 Concord Street 


78/4 & 86/1 


Denied 


344 


-648 


Town of Wilmington 


Main St/Middlesex Ave 


Rte 3 8 


Approved 


344 


-649 


N.E. Dev. Corp. 


32 Ballardvale St. 


98/1 


Approved 


344 


-650 


James Andella 


15 Marion Street 


17/2E 


Approved 


344 


-651 


Hazel O'Brien 


Baker Street Roadway 


4 5 /Roadway 


Approved 


344 


-652 


Hazel O'Brien 


Baker Street/Lot 1 


45/4E 


Approved 


344 


-653 


Hazel O'Brien 


Baker Street/Lot 4 


45/4B 


Approved 


344 


-654 


Triton Construction 


6 Isabella Way 


74/4D 


Approved 


344 


-655 


Lawrence Cushing 


800 Main Street 


38/2 


Approved 


344 


-656 


Eugene Sullivan 


14 Jewel Drive 


2 4 / 2 9A 


Approved 


344 


-657 


Norse Environmental 


94 Aldrich Road 


19/24 


Approved 


344 


-658 


Hazel O'Brien 


Baker Street/Lot 3 


45/4C 


Approved 


344 


-659 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


130 Marion St. /Lot 16 


15/13C 


Approved 


344 


-660 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


116 Marion St. /Lot 7 


15/14M 


Approved 


344 


-661 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


118 Marion St. /Lot 6 


15/14N 


Approved 


344 


-662 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


124 Marion St. /Lot 3 


15/14S 


Approved 


344 


-663 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


126 Marion St . /Lot 2 


15/14T 


Approved 


344 


-664 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


128 & 122 Marion St./ 


15/14V Sc 14R 


Withdrawn 








Lots 1 & 4 






344 


-665 


Neal & Olga Patel 


8 Lexington Street 


6 9/Roadway 


Denied 


344 


-666 


Steve Taylor 


2 Gloria Way 


67/87D 


Denied 


344 


-667 


Town of Wilmington 


Salem St /Anthony Ave 


90/6 


Approved 


344 


-669 


N.E. Landevelopment 


55 Adams Street 


50/lA 


Approved 


344 


-670 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


128 Marion St . /Lot 1 


15/14U 


Approved 


344 


-671 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


122 Marion St. /Lot 4 


15/14R 


Approved 


344 


-672 


Janet Ethier 


33 5 Woburn Street 


86/6 & 6A 


Approved 


344 


-673 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


137 Marion Street 


15/14G 


Approved 


344 


-674 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


141 Marion Street 


15/14E 


Approved 


344 


-675 


Ashley Dev. Corp. 


139 Marion Street 


15/14 


Approved 


344 


-676 


Triton Construction 


4 Isabella Way 


74/lD 


Approved 


344 


-677 


Pagenet of Mass. 


377 Ballardvale St. 


R3/50B 


Approved 


344 


-678 


Town of Wilmington 


One Adelaide Street 


42/7 & 54 


Approved 


344 


-679 


Town of Wilmington 


Glen Rd/Lubbers Brook 


54 & 55 


Approved 


344 


-680 


Clin Corp. 


Eames Street 


37/10 


Approved 


344 


-681 


James Andella 


4 Central Street 


52/3 


Approved 


344 


-682 


Contemporary Bldrs . 


152 Faulkner Avenue 


70/12 


Denied 


344 


-683 


John Gearty 


70 Forest Street 


7/2A & 2B 


Approved 


344 


-684 


Contemporary Bldrs . 


9 Mass . Avenue 


44/145 


Approved 


344 


-685 


Hazel O'Brien 


21 Baker Street 


45/4A 


Denied 


344 


-686 


Ronald King 


22 Mill Road 


3/2 


Denied 


344 


-687 


Public Access Board 


Grove Ave. /Lake St. 


45/103 


Pending 


344 


-688 


West Realty Trust 


140 West Street 


71/11 & 13 


Approved 


344 


-689 


Paul Szymanski 


69 Federal Street 


64/2 


Denied 


344 


-690 


Earl Bradberry 


53 Adams Street 


50/1 


Approved 


344 


-691 


John Murphy 


11 Christine Drive 


53/14J 


Approved 


344 


-692 


N.E. Dev. Corp. 


9 Tacoma Drive 


68/5 


Approved 


344 


-693 


N.E. Dev. Corp. 


11 Tacoma Drive 


68/6 


Approved 


344 


-694 


John Gearty 


9 Wirth Avenue 


7/13 


Approved 


344 


-695 


James Andella 


8 Elwood Road 


8/78 


Approved 


344 


-696 


Mark Ayvazian 


10 Winston Avenue 


9/21A 


Approved 


344 


-697 


Elise Semmler 


8 Revere Avenue 


10/16C 


Approved 



-117- 



344-699 Vincent Licciardi 

344-700 MBTA 

344-701 Tanner Road Realty 
Trust 

344-702 James Mangano 

344-7 03 James Mangano 

344-705 Teradyne, Inc. 

344-707 Lester Chisholm 

344-706 Analog Devices 



34 8 Woburn Street 
Main Street 

Tanner Road & 
Greenville Street 
9 Fenway Street 
7 Fenway Street 
Concord Street 
102 Mink Run Road 
82 Woburn Street 



86/16C Pending 
42/22A,22C, Pending 
22D,22G & 23 



84 /roadway 

17/6A 
17/6B 

85/lA & IB 

11/60A 

47/3 



Pending 

Pending 
Pending 
Pending 
Pending 
Pending 



Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation 



DEP # 



APPLICANT 



LOCATION 



MAP/ PARCEL 



DECISION 



344-633 24 Industrial 

Way Trust 
344-668 N.E. Dev. Corp. 

344-698 GFI - Big Joe's 



24 Industrial Way 46/132 

56 Butters Row 27/14 
1 Burlington Ave 30/13 



Approved 

Approved 
Denied 



Housing Partnership 



The Housing Partnership continued to be active in the review of the proposed 
affordable housing development located off Salem Street near Scaltrito Drive. 
The project's proponent is now AvalonBay Communities and the development is 
known as Avalon Oaks West. In response to Housing Partnership and town 
concerns AvalonBay significantly revised the design of the development. The 
total number of units and project density were decreased, the landscape 
buffer and building setbacks were increased, and reasonable traffic 
mitigation measures were proposed. Based on these changes, the Housing 
Partnership voted unanimously to approve the revised plan. Of special 
interest to the Housing Partnership was the commitment of the proponent to 
maintain the affordable units for a period of 90 years, instead of the 
standard 15 year period. AvalonBay also agreed to set aside the affordable 
units for Wilmington residents to the degree allowable by law. As of January 
2000, the proposal is before the Board of Appeals for a comprehensive permit. 

The Housing Partnership worked with Habitat for Humanity during the course of 
the year to determine if a partnership would be feasible by which Habitat for 
Humanity would construct a single-family affordable home on town-owned land. 



Housing Partnership members are Chair Raymond Forest, Vice-Chair Charles 
Boyle, Gregory Erickson, Alfred Meegan, Jr., Daniel Paret, Daniel Wandell and 
Lester White. Carole Hamilton resigned after many years of service and 
leadership. The Partnership meets the second Wednesday of the month and 
welcomes interested residents to attend. 



-118- 



open Space and Recreation Plan Committee 



The Wilmington Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee was formed in March 
to update the town's Open Space and Recreation Plan. The committee is 
comprised of twenty citizens and town officials appointed by the Town Manager 
who share a desire to protect open space and to provide recreational 
opportunities for the town's residents. 

A survey designed by the Committee was distributed to residents in July, and 
the Committee was pleasantly surprised by the response. Nearly 1,500 surveys 
were returned, and the results are being incorporated into the Open Space and 
Recreation Plan. 

The Open Space and Recreation Plan is important for several reasons. It is 
an invaluable planning tool in itself, particularly as development pressures 
rapidly reduce open space in town. Additionally, a current Open Space and 
Recreation Plan is a requirement for eligibility for certain state-funded 
grants for land acquisition. The State's Division of Conservation Services, 
which must approve the Plan, requires that it be updated every five years for 
purposes of grant eligibility. 

Metropolitan Area Plaooiog Couocil 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency 
that serves 101 communities in the metropolitan Boston area. It was created 
by an act of the state legislature in 1963 and has been serving its 
communities in a varieties of ways since that time. The Council is composed 
of one representative from each of the 101 communities appointed by the Chief 
Elected Officials (CEOs) of each of these cities and towns. In addition, 
there are 21 gubernatorial appointees and 14 agency (such as the DEM, Mass 
Port and MBTA) appointees on the Council. The 25 member elected Executive 
Committee meets 11 times a year. The full Council meets three times a year. 
Meetings are held at various localities throughout the region. 

In order to serve its communities better, MAPC has organized eight 
subregions . These groups are composed of representatives from the member 
communities and a MAPC staff planner. The subregions meet on a regular basis 
to discuss and work on issues of local concern. Burlington, Lynnfield, North 
Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester and Woburn are 
the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC) . The NSPC met seven times during 
1999 with most meetings primarily focused on transportation. As with the 
other subregions that went to a schedule of bimonthly meetings, NSPC 
experimented with publishing a newsletter. North Suburban Notes , to keep 
members informed about important subregional issues. This newsletter was 
discontinued when NSPC resumed meeting monthly. 

NSPC members worked to develop a process for reviewing and prioritizing 
projects on the TIP. Following presentations from each community on the 
merits of the projects and group discussion, NSPC reached a consensus on 
project priorities. Eleven projects were ranked as high priority and seven 
were rated as medium priority. The remaining ten projects were deemed low 
priority. Route 62 was recognized as a significant regional corridor and 
projects in several communities were among those rated as high priority. 
These priorities were forwarded to MPO so that subregional needs can be taken 
into consideration when future drafts of the TIP are developed. 



-119- 



In September NSPC began to develop a FY-2 000 work program that would add land 
use topics back to a schedule that had been almost exclusively 
transportation. The work program was adopted in October and elections were 
held for officers. 

On behalf of three communities in the NSPC region (Stoneham, Winchester and 
Woburn) , MAPC secured a grant from DEM to develop a web site to be used as an 
outreach tool for the Tri -Community Bikeway/Greenway project. 

On the regionwide scale MAPC is involved with so may programs and issues that 
it is not possible to mention them all, However, the following list should 
give some idea of the breadth of activities, responsibilities and challenges 
the agency has met over the past year. 

Buildout Analysis Projects 

MAPC is continuing its work with local communities on buildout analysis. 
Last year MAPC developed a CIS methodology for these community buildouts. 
This work came to the attention of the Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs who saw it as a good tool to help communities focus on their local 
growth potential. Subsequently, EOEA decided to fund buildouts for all 
Massachusetts communities. They have contracted with MAPC and other agencies 
to do the work. Everyone is using the MAPC methodology. MAPC expects to 
complete 47 buildouts this fiscal year. The work on the remaining 
communities will be done the following year. 

The purpose of a buildout study is to create an approximate "vision" in 
quantitative terms, of the potential future growth permitted and encouraged 
by a community's by-laws. Using maps, a buildout analysis can described the 
level, type and location of such potential future growth. The result is only 
an estimate of a possible future for the communities, but it helps residents 
and public officials to develop an understanding of the implications of 
current zoning regulations. If the level or type of potential future 
development shown in the buildout analysis is not consistent with the 
community's goals or vision for the future, the residents may choose to make 
appropriate changes to the regulations. 

Regional Service Initiative 

MAPC has worked with local officials to establish three consortia in the 
North Shore, the North Suburban and the South Shore areas. The groups have 
applied for state funding, but at this point the project is supported totally 
by local funds . The North Shore and North Suburban are sharing the services 
of a regional coordinator who has an office in Salem State College. The 
South Shore has a part-time coordinator who works out of the Hingham Town 
Hall. Initially, regional coordinators will concentrate on joint purchasing 
of supplies and services. These joint purchases are expected to show 
immediate and significant savings. Municipal managers have expressed 
interest in regional human resources, including training. Gradually many 
other municipal services will become likely candidates for regional delivery 
approaches . 



-120- 



Southeastern Massachusetts Vision 2020 



MAPC is continuing its work with the Old Colony Planning Council and the 
Southeastern Regional Planning and Economic Development District on the 
initiative to address uncontrolled sprawl and improve management of the rapid 
changes occurring in this region of the Commonwealth. The project recognizes 
that important choices lie ahead for the communities of southeastern 
Massachusetts and that a clear vision for the future will lead to more 
effective decision making. 

The group has prepared a report: Vision 2020: An Agenda for the Future. 
This report deals with the facts, trends and issues confronting the region, 
ending with a strategy for action. The report was finished this spring. The 
committee is now making the contents of the report known throughout the 
region by way of a slide show. 

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy 

MAPC is responsible for producing a Comprehensive Economic Development 
Strategy (CEDS) for the Boston region, in order to meet the requirements of 
the federal Economic Development Administration (EDA) . 

MAPC communities have this opportunity to identify an economic development 
vision, and an action plan and implementation steps which include local and 
regional, priority projects. The completed CEDS will be the blueprint for 
future economic development projects and funding from a wide variety of 
public, nonprofit and private sources. The strategy will also address 
economic development related issues such as transportation and housing 
projects and the environmental impacts of development. 

1-495 Initiative 

Through the 1-495 Initiative, MAPC continues to work cooperatively with the 
Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, legislators, and companies and 
communities near the fast growing 1-495 Corridor. The project is funded in 
part by the U.S. Department of Economic Development. The goal is to develop 
innovative solutions to the challenges of growth, business competitiveness, 
local fiscal stability, and resource protection. This year, the Initiative 
hosted its second major regional conference, achieved $250,000 in federal 
funding for a regional transportation study and ridesharing incentives, began 
a web-based clearinghouse and virtual technical assistance center, assisted 
in the formation of a six community Assabet River Consortium, and facilitated 
public-private dialogue about alternative technologies, reverse commuting and 
more predictable permitting. 

Welfare to Work 

MAPC is the grant recipient of a US Department of Labor Welfare- to-Work 
Grant. MAPC brings an innovative and collaborative approach to assisting 
low-income job seekers overcome systemic transportation barriers. By linking 
employers, workforce development agencies and transportation providers, the 
project has improved access to existing mass transit, identified major 
employment centers that lack access and offered innovative support where 
public transportation is not feasible. MAPC has convened a unique 
collaboration that provides employment transportation for low- income 
communities . 



-121- 



Metropolitan Affairs Coalition 

MAPC is serving as the staff of the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition, (MAC) . 
MAC grew out of the Challenge to Leadership, a twelve-year effort initiated 
by Cardinal Law. Church leaders along with business, labor, academic, public 
sector and other non-profit organizations help define a civic agenda for the 
city and the region. The MAC is designed to give a depth and an on-going 
presence to issues that have a metropolitan scope. The initial issue that 
the MAC is addressing is housing in the metropolitan region. 

Middlesex Caml Commission 

The Middlesex Canal Association had a busy year. There were three public 
meetings: Thomas Dahill presented slides and an explanation of his detailed 
water color paintings for Carl Seaburg ' s book The Incredible Ditch , an 
Engineer from ICON Architecture Inc., Beatrice Bernier, presented graphic 
displays of a variety of possibilities for the development of the Billerica 
Mill Pond - the major site along the entire canal, and David Dettinger gave a 
presentation about the Baldwin family. 

The two annual walks were held in Woburn and Billerica. These are open to 
the public and are well received. We had a joint meeting with the Lowell 
Park Service for an evening picnic on one of their motorized boats for a ride 
through the Lowell locks and up the Merrimack River to the spot where the 
Middlesex Canal enters . A memorial wreath was thrown into the river at the 
point of entry. 

The engineering firm PAL (Public Archaeology Laboratory) completed their 
report, thereby ending the first stage to have the entire canal placed on the 
National Historic Registry. We launched our first fund raising campaign this 
year to pay for this procedure and funds continue to come in. 

The Middlesex Canal Commission had a busy year too. Phase one (Billerica 
Mill Pond site) of the five-phase project occupied most of our energy this 
year. Efforts to acquire easements to and the purchase of land around the 
pond are still underway. Several appraisals of the land's value were needed 
before offers could be made. We are still trying to reach firm agreements. 

On July 26, 1999, a request for proposals for phase two was advertised and 
representatives from 35 firms arrived at the Lowell Town Hall to discuss the 
$250,000 project. This project is to delineate the exact plan for 
revitalizing the 10.6 miles of remaining canal. At the public meeting, 
numerous questions were raised about the quantity of surveying needed. The 
proposal was put on hold until meeting with the Massachusetts Highway 
Department through which the funding comes. Together we have come up with a 
plan for aerial topography, which gives 6" definition and eliminates much of 
the need for the more expensive groundwork. The renewed RFP will be out for 
bids in late January or early February and hopefully completed by December 
2000 . 

The Middlesex Canal Association is an active group and we would like to 
welcome those of you with historical interests to join us. 



-122- 



Inspector of Biiildiogs 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts building, plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the 
Town of Wilmington Zoning Bylaw, and for maintaining all related records. In 
addition, all administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are handled by 
this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Daniel Paret; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is 
William Harrison; the Wiring Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Joan Goulet, Toni 
LaRivee and Wendy Martiniello make up the clerical staff, which is shared with 
the Board of Health. 

It is our goal to help people understand the regulations enforced by the 
Inspector of Buildings, how best to comply with those regulations, and to 
provide assistance to residents and others who have questions about homes and 
property in the Town. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to 
come and see us . 







1 Q 




1 Q Q Q 

1 y y o 






V*\J < 




Mo 


\7a 1 1 1 a t~ T r\ 


Mo 




IIS 

J. J. o 


<i;in 14.1 ft^n 


o z 


dAQ nnn 

/ *±*±-7 / \J \J \J 


D -/ 


Add.it ions 


J. J Z 






J , O , D O J 




Remode 1 i ng 


ion 
iz u 


oil, 1 U D 


1 T C 
1 ID 


QO Q ezo 
y f oZ^ 




uciJ-Xcy uuiiaings 


z o 


yo, u D y 


J. / 


1 u / , yy^ 


J. J 


Pools 


33 


111, 597 


53 


307, 512 


54 


Miscellaneous 


64 


104, 671 


56 


162, 954 


70 




491 


$13, 861, 373 


439 


$10,495, 764 


464 


COMMERCIAL 












New Buildings 


5 


$6,700,000 


11 


$10, 577, 524 


2 


Public Buildings 










2 


Additions 


3 


2 , 899, 209 


8 


2, 344, 928 


5 


Fitups 


54 


10,291, 045 


50 


5, 359, 638 


63 


Utility Buildings 


2 


194 , 000 


3 


134, 000 


6 


Signs 


16 


39, 645 


22 


49,470 


20 


Miscellaneous 


18 


1, 106, 850 


9 


257, 498 


12 




98 


$21, 230, 749 


103 


$18, 723 , 058 


110 


TOTAL 


589 


$35, 092, 122 


542 


$29,218, 822 


574 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED 


AND 










SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 












Building Permits 


589 


$186, 214 . 75 


542 


$156,059.00 


574 


Wiring Permits 


638 


32, 846 .00 


642 


47, 114.75 


647 


Gas Permits 


231 


7, 442 . 00 


241 


8,269.00 


237 


Plumbing Permits 


333 


12,020.00 


291 


12, 500 . 00 


304 


Cert, of Inspection 


6 


263 . 00 


31 


1,368.00 


37 


Copies 




702 .35 




397 . 00 




Court 














Industrial Elec . Permits 


41 


6, 150 . 00 


67 


9, 900 . 00 


55 




1, 838 


$245, 638 . 10 


1, 814 


$239, 442 . 75 


1, 854 



1999 
Valuation 

$6,272, 773 
4, 041, 126 
834 , 949 
68, 383 
297, 841 
557, 847 
$12, 072, 919 



$228, 000 
28, 819, 437 
608, 000 
9, 998, 726 
284, 000 
59,338 
1, 083, 699 
$41, 081, 200 

$53, 154, 119 



$129, 021 . 25 
33,352 .50 
7, 077 . 00 
12, 315 . 00 
1,586.00 
167 . 80 
12 .00 
8,250 ■ 00 
$191, 781 . 55 



-123- 



Board of Appeals 



Case 1-99 CM Realty Trust Map 43 Parcel 4 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.2.8.1 to extend exhaust pipes 
servicing an auto repair shop at the rear of subject premises beyond the 48- 
foot height limit to 60 feet above grade for property located on 275 Main 
Street . 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.2.8.1. 



Case 2-99 TCM Realty Trust Map 74 Parcel 2 J 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 5, West Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 3-99 TCM Realty Trust Map 74 Parcel ID 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 6, West Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 4-99 Ralph E. Newhouse Map 18 Parcel 8R 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 20 Presidential Drive. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 5-99 Ann F. Ethier Map 86 Parcels 6 & 6A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 335 Woburn Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 6A-99 California Products Corporation Map 30 Parcel 13 

A special permit in accordance with Table 1 Principal Use Regulations -General 
Industrial Zoning District for property located on 1 Burlington Avenue. 



-124- 



Case 6B-99 



California Products Corporation 



Map 3 Parcel 13 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.6.1 - Ground Water Protection 
District B - use of hazardous materials for property located on 1 Burlington 
Avenue . 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 7-99 SSG, Inc. Map Rl Parcel 305 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.5 authorizing a Limited 
Manufacturing use as an accessory use to a Light Manufacturing activity in a 
General Industrial Zone for property located on 65 Jonspin Road. 

Granted - must meet conditions of Site Plan Review and the Fire Chief. 



Case 8-99 Donald P. Sullivan Map 55 Parcel 72 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2 for an Accessory Apartment for 
property located on 3 Beverly Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 9-99 Robert A. Ricci Map 8 Parcel 97B 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5. for a 
garage to be 17 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required for 
property located on 8 Carter Road. 

Granted - for an attached garage no closer than 17 feet from the side 
yard lot line. 



Case 10-99 Bell Atlantic Mobile Map Rl Parcel 23 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 Wireless Communications Facility 
to co-locate on an existing tower located at 773 Salem Street. 

Granted - (1) The generator to use natural gas and (2) Testing of the 

generator to be done during the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. 



Case 11-99 Batten Bros., Inc. Map 56 Parcel 3B 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.3.5.3 to erect one freestanding 
sign facing Route 93 for property located on 155 West Street. 

Denied - no demonstrated hardship. 



-125- 



Case 12-99 



Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 



Map 2 Parcel 19 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot B, Chestnut Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 13-99 Patricia Robarge Map 40 Parcels 111 & 115 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 to 
construct a single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient paved 
frontage on Olive Street for property located on Olive Street. 

Granted - as approved on a plan submitted to the Planning Board. 



Case 14-99 4*^ of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

A special permit for a carnival to run from June 3 through July 5, 1999 for 
property located on 159 Church Street. 

Granted - in harmony with the general purpose and intent of the Zoning By- 
law. 



Case 15-99 Michael Stansbury Map 106 Parcel 201 

An amendment to Comprehensive Permit #46-88 - for an even land swap to make 
property lines straight between 4401 Pouliot Place and 4202 Pouliot Place. 

Granted - as shown on a plan of land drawn by Robert E. Anderson dated 
February 2, 1999, Scale: 1"=20' . 



Case 16-99 Edward Coughlin Map 79 Parcel 22A 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 for an 
addition to be 27 feet from the front yard lot line when 30 feet is required 
for property located on 8 Pinewood Road. 

Granted - no closer than 27 feet from the front yard lot line. 



Case 17-99 Peter H. Lewis Map 46 Parcel 134 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 for an 
addition to be 2 feet from the front yard lot line on Woburn Street when 50 
feet is required for property located on 2 Industrial Way. 

Pending - 



-126- 



Case 18-99 



Michael J. Welch Map 47 Parcel 25 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 13 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required 
for property located on 6 Oxbow Drive. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 19-99 Nextel Communications Map 31 Parcel 59 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8.4.1, 6.5 and 8.6 to co-locate on 
the Nassau Avenue Standpipe for property located on Nassau Avenue. 

Granted - meets the criteria of Sec. 61.8.4.1, 6.5 and 8.6. 



Case 20-99 Phillip V. Marquard Map 59 Parcel 39 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 34 feet from the front yard lot line when 40 feet is required 

Denied - no demonstrated hardship. 

and for a special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2.7 (Accessory Apartment) 
for property located on 21 Kenwood Avenue. 

Granted - meets requirements of the By-law. 



Case 21-99 John F. Benevento Map Rl Parcel 28 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.6 to operate a soil recycling 
plant, which is a General Manufacturing use in a General Industrial Zone 

Case 21A-99 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6 to operate a soil recycling 
plant in a Ground Water Protection District for property located on 900 Salem 
Street . 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 22-99 880 Main Street LLC Map 38 Parcel 2 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6 to install underground storage 
tanks in a Ground Water Protection District for property located on 880 Main 
Street . 

Granted - with conditions of Site Plan Review approval. 



-127- 



Case 23-99 



Cream- E- Scoops 



Map 41 Parcel 137A 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.4 and 3.8.4 for a Limited 
Service Restaurant for property located on 2 Lowell Street. 

Granted - with the conditions (1) no outside seating and (2) no more than 
12 seats. 



Case 24-99 Joyce A. Burchsted Map 9 Parcel 21C 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for a 
deck to be five feet from the side yard lot line when 25 feet is required for 
property located on 19 Avon Street. 

Withdravm - without prejudice. 



Case 25-99 Joseph & Lisa Favuzza Map 86 Parcel 8F 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 14 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required 
for property located on 9 Great Neck Drive. 

Granted - no closer than 14 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 26-99 Town of Wilmington Map 42 Parcel 54 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a Public Safety Building to be 26 
feet from the front yard lot line when 3 feet is required and 12 feet from 
the rear yard lot line when 15 feet is required for property located on 
Adelaide Street. 

Granted - would not derogate from the intent and purpose of the By-law. 



Case 27-99 Gino DeVecchia Map 36 Parcel 131 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.4 for an 
addition to be 33 feet from the front lot line, original decision was 36 feet 
from the front lot line, for property located on 4 Russell Road. 

Granted - no closer than 33 feet from the front yard lot line. 



Case 28-99 Gregory & Linda Boutoures Map 35 Parcel 208 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
addition to be 10 feet from the side yard lot line when 20 feet is required, 
previously granted but not constructed in Case #72-95 for property located on 
18 Ohio Street. 

Granted - to extend a nonconf oarming structure no closer than 18 feet from 

the side yard lot line. 



-128- 



Case 29-99 



Joseph & Wendy Diecidue 



Map 9 Parcel 5 9A 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 for an 
above-ground pool to be 12 feet from the side yard lot line when 25 feet is 
required for property located on 8 Buckingham Street. 

Granted - no closer than 23 feet from the side yard lot line for the life 
of the pool. 



Case 30-99 Pagenet of Massachusetts Map R3 Parcel 50B 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.8 to co-locate on an existing 
wireless communications facility for property located on 375 Ballardvale 
Street . 

Granted - in harmony with general purpose and intent of Sec. 6.6. 



Case 31-99 Ashley Development Map 15 Parcel 14E 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 141 Marion Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 32-99 Ashley Development Map 15 Parcel 14F 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 139 Marion Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 33-99 Ashley Development Map 15 Parcel 13C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 13 Marion Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 34-99 Princeton Wilmington LLC Map 70 Parcels 97,98,99 & 101 

A Comprehensive Permit in accordance with MGL Chapter 4 OB to construct twelve 
(12) buildings/142 apartment units for property located on Salem Street. 

Pending - 



-129- 



• IS; 

Ml 



Case 35-99 James Mangano Map 16 & 17 Parcels 6 & 67 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 1 Fenway Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 36-99 James Mangano Map 16 & 17 Parcels 6 & 67 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on Lot 2 Fenway Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 



Case 37-99 Timothy Penney Map 10 Parcel 2 3 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.2 to 
construct a dwelling on a lot having insufficient paved frontage for property 
located on 9 Revere Avenue . 

Granted - with the stipulations that the driveway placement be approved by 
the Town Engineer and, if the fire hydrant is moved, it will be 
at the expense of the applicant. 



Case 38-99 Tutela Engineering Associates Map 42 Parcel 22H 

A special permit for an addition to a nonconforming structure and to extend 
the structure up to five feet from the rear property line for property 
located on 325 Main Street. 

Pending - 



Case 39-99 Kevin & Jennifer Cryts Map 21 Parcel 6E 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 to 
construct an addition 10 feet from the rear yard lot line when 20 feet is 
required for property located on 12 Cushing Drive. 

Granted - no closer than 15 feet from the rear yard lot line. 



Case 40-99 Michael & Laurey Tedesco Map 9 Parcel 86B 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.5 to 
construct an addition 18 feet from the side yard lot line when 25 feet is 
required for property located on 3 Buckingham Street. 

Granted - no closer than 20 feet from the side yard lot line. 



-130- 



Case 47-99 



Northeastern Development Corp 



Map 68 Parcel 4 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 7 Tacoma Drive. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 

Case 48-99 Northeastern Development Corp. Map 68 Parcel 5 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 9 Tacoma Drive . 

Granted - meets criteria o£ Sec. 5.3.4. 

Case 49-99 Northeastern Development Corp. Map 68 Parcel 9 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 15 Seneca Lane. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 

Case 50-99 Northeastern Development Corp. Map 68 Parcel 12 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 21 Seneca Lane. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 

Case 51-99 Northeastern Development Corp. Map 68 Parcel 14 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot 
for property located on 25 Seneca Lane. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 5.3.4. 

Case 52-99 West Realty Trust Map 71 Parcels 11 & 13 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.6.7.7 for the expansion of an 
existing parking area for property located on 140 West Street. 

Granted - meets requirements of the By-law, with the conditions of Site 
Plan Review approval . 



-132- 



Case 53-99 



John C. Clark Map 50 Parcels 100,101,102 



A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 and 
5.2.3 to construct a new dwelling on a lot having insufficient area and width 
for property located on 22 Sheldon Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 54-99 Kevin Ryan Map 5 Parcel 2B 

A variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) Sec. 5.2.1 for an 
addition to be 14 feet from the side yard lot line when 2 feet is required 
for property located on 54 Marion Street. 

Granted - no closer than 17 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 55-99 Cellular One Map R2 Parcel 23B 

A special permit, in accordance with Sec. 6.8, to install, operate and 
maintain a wireless communications facility on and next to an existing 
monopole at 250 Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - meets criteria of Sec. 6.8. 



Case 56-99 Mark & Karen Wadland Map 11 Parcel 38B 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a deck to be 18 feet from the side and 22 feet 
from the rear yard lot line when 25 feet is required for property located on 
2 9 Albany Street. 

Granted - no closer than 18 feet from the rear and 22 feet from the side 
yard lot line with the condition that the deck cannot be 
enclosed. 




Construction of the addition to the Methodist Church. 



TOWN MEETINGS & ELECTIONS 



Coe: 



.s 



table 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts. 



Annual Town Meeting and Town Election 



March 12, 1999 



Special Town Meeting 



October 26, 1999 



It is with great sadness that we note the passing of Charles L. Ellsworth, 
our Town Constable. He assisted the Town Clerk and Board of Registrars in 
the posting of all legal matters concerning Town Meetings and Elections since 
August of 1988 and he will be missed. 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the 
manner prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs 
to meet and assemble at the West Intermediate School (Precincts 1 and 2), the 
Wildwood School (Precincts 3 and 4), and the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 
5 and 6) N.B., Saturday the seventeenth day of April, A.D. 1999 at 9:45 
o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 A.M. and shall be 
closed at 8:00 P.M. for the election of town officers: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices to wit: Two Selectmen for the term of Three Years; 
Two Members of the School Committee for the term of Three Years; One Member 
of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of Five Years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections 
and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in the Town 
Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of 
Wilmington, on Saturday the twenty- fourth day of April, A.D. 1999 at 10:30 
A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall, Former Town Clerk Priscilla 
Ward, at the West Intermediate School, and the Assistant Town Clerk, Carolyn 
M. Kenney at the Wildwood School. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 
candidates could examine them before the polls were opened. The checkers 
were prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and 
everything was in readiness at 10:00 A.M. and the polls were declared open. 



Town Meetie' 




WARRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 17, 1999 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The results were as follows: 



SELECTMEN for three years (vote for two) 



Michael V. McCoy 

Michael J. Newhouse 

Philip R. Beninati 
Mark Nelson 
Blanks 
Total 



11 Treasure Hill Road 
(Cand. For Re-election) 
6 Beverly Avenue 
(Cand. For Re-election) 
2301 Pouliot Place 
6 Polk Street 



Voted 
853 



1, 128 



399 
695 
577 
3 , 652 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for two) 
Barbara K. Breakey 63 Middlesex Avenue 

(Cand. For Re-election) 1,166 

Bridget T. Zukas 50 McDonald Road 997 

Blanks 1,489 

Total 3,652 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 
Christopher P. Barry 
Blanks 
Total 



for five years (vote 
2 6 Arlene Avenue 



one ) 

1,200 
626 
1, 826 



Question #1 

Shall the Town of Wilmington accept Section 2D of Chapter 59 of the General 
Laws, which provides for taxing certain improved real property based on its 
value at the time an occupancy permit is issued? 



Yes 775 

No 517 

Blanks 534 

Total 1,826 



The results of this election were ready at 9:00 P.M. and the elected officer 
present were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the Town 
Clerk shortly thereafter. The total number of votes cast was 1,826, which 
included 91 absentee ballots. The total number of registered voters is 
13,871 of which 13% voted in this year's town election. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 24, 1999 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



With a quorum present at 10:50 A.M. (150) James Stewart, the Moderator opene 
the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. He then read the names of 
departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year and a moment of silence was observed. He then 
introduced our newly elected and re-elected town officials. The Moderator 
informed the meeting that he would take up Articles 1-14 in order and then 
random selection would begin. 

The Moderator then started to read the warrant and was interrupted by 
Selectman, Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the Moderator dispense with 
further reading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each articl 
by number." Motion seconded and so voted. 



ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by Michael 
A. Caira, "I move to pass over this article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 3 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass 
over this article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1999, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 



Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1999, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 17." Finance Committee recommends approval. Seconded and 
so voted. 



ARTICLE 5 . To see how much money the town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee Chairman, "I move that 
the several and respective sums as recommended and presented by the 
Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds and appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article #5, each 
department ' s budget to be taken up and voted on in the order they 
appear, subject to amendment, and each department's budget not open for 
reconsideration until the entire budget is voted. " Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously. 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT Voted 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 2,880 

Expenses 12,000 

Total 14,880 



Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 15,832 

Expenses 4,325 

Total 20,157 



Registrars of Voters 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



1, 700 

5, 015 

6, 715 



-136- 



Finance Committee 



Salaries 


900 


Expenses 


6, 585 


Total 


7,485 


Town Manager 




Salary - Tovm Manager 


92, 021 


Other Salaries 


227, 797 


Expenses 


53 , 045 


Furnishings & Equipment 


600 


Total 


373,463 


Town Accountant 




Salary - Town Accountant 


66, 687 


Other Salaries 


125, 040 


Expenses 


2 , 375 


Total 


194 , 102 


Treasurer/ Collector 




Salary - Finance Director 


53 , 777 


Other Salaries 


112 , 867 


Expenses 


35, 695 


Furnishings & Equipment 


850 


Total 


203 , 189 


Town Clerk 




Salary - Town Clerk 


57,435 


Other Salaries 


/ U , ZZZ 


Expenses 


2, 380 


Total 


130, 037 


Board of Assessors 




Salary - Principal Assessor 


69, 985 


Other Salaries 


73 , 557 


Expenses 


38, 800 


Appraisals & Inventories 


85, 250 


ATB Costs 


15, 000 


Furnishings & Equipment 


3 ,200 


Total 


285 , 792 


Town Counsel 




Legal Services 


89,000 


Permanent Building Committee 




Salaries 


2 , 000 


Expenses 


100 


Total 


2 , 100 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



1, 326, 920 



PROTECTION 



PERSONS Sc PROPERTY 



Police Department 



Salary - 


Chief 


89, 988 


Salary - 


Deputy Chief 


66, 992 


Salary - 


Lieutenant 


112 , 992 


Salary - 


Sergeants 


283, 911 


Salary - 


Patrolmen* 


1, 212 , 995 


Salary - 


Dispatchers** 


70, 006 


Salary - 


Clerical 


66, 567 


Salary - 


Fill-In Costs 


261,000 


Salary - 


Paid Holidays 


77, 318 


Salary - 


Specialist 


10, 700 


Salary - 


Night Diff. 


32, 760 


Salary - 


Incentive 


199, 968 


Sick Leave Buyback 


14 , 360 


Expenses 




180, 560 


Total 




2 , 680 , 117 



* Includes three patrolmen funded $25,000 from Federal Grant 

* Three dispatchers funded $3,939 from Federal Grant. 



Fire Department 
Salary - Chief 
Salary - Deputy Chief 
Salary - Lieutenants 
Salary - Privates 
Salary - Dispatch Clerks 
Salary - Part Time 
Overtime Costs 
Paid Holidays 
EMT & Incentive Pay 
Fire Alarm Salary 
Sick Leave Buyback 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



82 , 188 
62 , 249 
271, 058 
1, 222, 032 
65, 149 
8, 320 
220, 000 
86, 582 
10, 025 
15, 000 
19, 242 
85,200 
41,000 
2 , 188, 045 



Animal Control 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



26, 000 
4 , 600 
30, 600 



TOTAL - PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



4, 898, 762 



PUBLIC WORKS 

Personnel Services 

DPW - Superintendent 
Engineer - Full Time 
Engineer - Part Time 
Highway - Full Time 
Highway - Part Time 
Highway - Seasonal 
Stream Maintenance - Seasonal 
Tree - Full Time 
Tree - Overtime 
Parks/Grounds - Full Time 
Parks/Grounds - Overtime 



73, 382 
138, 279 
31, 248 

917, 012 
10,400 
13 , 440 
15, 120 

134, 684 
5, 510 

186, 991 
13, 820 



-138- 



Cemetery - Full Time 




100, 


757 


Cemetery - Part Time 




10, 


598 


Cemetery - Overtime 




7 , 


320 


Snow Sc Ice - Ex. Help/0. T. 




135, 


514 


Total 


1, 


794 , 


075 


Contractual Services 








Engineer 




2 , 


200 


Highway 




54 , 


250 


Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 




80, 


900 


Highway - Training & Conference 




2 , 


700 


Tree 




3, 


000 


Parks /Grounds 




2 , 


000 


Cemetery 




4, 


100 


Road Machinery - Repair 




65, 


000 


Public Street Lights 




211, 


060 


Rubbish Collection & Disposal 


1, 


876, 


000 


Snow Sc Ice - Repairs 




16, 


245 


Snow Sc Ice - Misc. Services 




125 , 


000 


Total 


2, 


442 , 


455 


Materials & Supplies 








Engineer 




1, 


300 


Highway 




39, 


000 


Highway - Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 




67, 


500 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 




65, 


000 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 




52 , 


090 


Stream Maintenance - Expenses 




1, 


000 


Tree 




6 , 


395 


Parks/Grounds 




30 , 


400 


Cemetery 




21, 


650 


Chapter 81 - Maintenance 









Drainage Projects 




25, 


000 


Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 




91 , 


325 


Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 




4 , 


000 


Total 




404 , 


660 


Furnishings & Equipment 




29, 


000 


Total 


4 , 


670 , 


190 


Sewer 








Personnel Services 




48, 


097 


Maintenance & Operations 




70, 


750 


Total 




118 , 


847 


TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


4,789, 


037 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$4,789,037 be appropriated for the Department of Public Works; the sum 
of $40 , 000 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Account and the sum of $20 , 000 to be raised by transfer from the 
Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be applied to line 
item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of 
$4,729,037 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



-139- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 57,578 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 126,014 

Expenses 8,580 

Mental Health 22,200 

Furnishings & Equipment 700 

Total 215,072 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries 4,500 

Expenses 80 

Total 4,580 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 60,001 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 114,314 

Expenses 13,500 

Total 187,815 

Building Insp./Bd. of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 52,252 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 71,589 

Expenses 5,325 

Total 129,166 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 536, 633 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Maintenance & Operation 

Salary - Superintendent 84,389 

Other Salaries 1,533,631 

Overtime 32,500 

Part Time Seasonal 13,440 

Heating Fuel 214,000 

Electricity 98,000 

Utilities 67,000 

Expenses 266,485 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 2 , 309, 445 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 6,500 

Expenses 1,750 

Assistance - Veterans 10 , 000 

Total 18,250 

Library 

Salary - Director 52,265 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 392,815 

M.V.L.C. 26,049 

Expenses 89,2 95 

Furnishings & Equipment 11 , 195 

Total 571,619 



-140- 



Cemetery - Full Time 


100, 


757 


Cemetery - Part Time 


10, 


598 


Cemetery - Overtime 


7, 


320 


Snow & Ice - Ex. Help/0. T. 


135 , 


514 


Total 


1, 794 , 


075 


Contractual Services 






Engineer 


2 , 


200 


Highway 


54, 


250 


Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 


80, 


900 


Highway - Training & Conference 


2 , 


700 


Tree 


3 , 


000 


Parks /Grounds 


2 , 


000 


Cemetery 


4, 


100 


Road Machinery - Repair 


65, 


000 


Public Street Lights 


211 


060 


Rubbish Collection & Disposal 


1, 876 


000 


Snow Sc Ice - Repairs 


16 


245 


Snow Sc Ice - Misc. Services 


125 


000 


Total 


2 , 442 


455 


Materials & Supplies 






Engineer 


1 


300 


Highway 


39 


000 


Highway - Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 


67 


500 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 


65 


000 


Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 


52 


090 


Stream Maintenance - Expenses 


1 


000 


Tree 


6 


395 


Parks /Grounds 


30 


400 


Cemetery 


21 


650 


Chapter 81 - Maintenance 







Drainage Projects 


25 


000 


Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 


91 


325 


Snow Sc Ice - Tools & Equipment 


4 


000 


Total 


404 


660 


Furnishings & Equipment 


29 


000 


Total 


4 , 670 


190 


Sewer 






Personnel Services 


48 


097 


Maintenance & Operations 


70 


750 


Total 


118 


847 


TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 


4,789 


037 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$4,789,037 be appropriated for the Department of Public Works; the sum 
of $40 , 000 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Account and the sum of $20 , 000 to be raised by transfer from the 
Interest Cemetery Trust Funds and that both amounts be applied to line 
item Personnel Services Cemetery - Full Time and that the balance of 
$4,729,037 be raised by taxation. " Motion seconded and so voted. 



-139- 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t 

Expenses 

Mental Health 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 



57, 578 
126, 014 
8,580 
22,200 
700 
215 , 072 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



4, 500 

80 

4, 580 



Planning & Conservation 
Salary - Director 
Other Salaries (incl, 
Expenses 
Total 



p.t 



60, 001 
114, 314 

13 , 500 
187, 815 



Building Insp./Bd. of Appeals 
Salary - Building Inspector 
Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



52 , 252 
71,589 
5, 325 
129, 166 

536, 633 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Maintenance & Operation 
Salary - Superintendent 
Other Salaries 
Overtime 

Part Time Seasonal 
Heating Fuel 
Electricity 
Utilities 
Expenses 



84 , 389 
533 , 631 
32, 500 
13 , 440 
214 , 000 
98,000 
67, 000 
266, 485 



TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



2 , 309, 445 



HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 
Expenses 

Assistance - Veterans 
Total 



6, 500 
1, 750 
10, OOP 
18, 250 



Library 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 

M. V.L.C. 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



52,265 
392, 815 
26, 049 
89, 295 
11, 195 
571, 619 



■140- 




Recreation 

Salary - Director 62,028 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 42,698 

Expenses 2,800 

Total 107,526 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 39,528 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 59,670 

Expenses 34,800 

Furnishings & Equipment 2,500 

Total 136,498 

Historical Commission 

Salaries (incl. p.t.) 14,025 

Expenses 4,650 

Furnishings & Equipment 2,000 

Total 20,675 

Commission on Disabilities 

Salaries (incl. p.t.) 500 

Expenses 250 

Total 750 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 855 , 318 

SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 18,382,300 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District 2 , 127 , 292 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 20, 509, 592 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 93,083 

General Government 299,858 

Sewer 103,064 

Water 150,241 
Interest on Anticipation Notes & 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 1,093,500 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$1,739,746 be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest and that the 
sum of $150,241 be transferred from Water Dept. - Available Funds and 

applied to Maturing Debt & Interest - Water Account and the sum of $543 
be transferred from Water Dept. - Available Funds and applied to 
Interest on Anticipation Notes and Authentication Fees and 
Miscellaneous Debt and that the remaining balance of $1,588, 962 be 

raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 1, 739, 746 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance 339,010 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 2,800,000 

Veteran's Retirement 13,321 

Employee Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 20,625 



-141- 



Medicare Employer Contribution 
Salary Adjustment & Additional Costs 
Local Transportation/Training Conferences 
Out-of-state Travel 

Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 
Records Storage 
Annual Audit 
Ambulance Billing 
Town Report 

Deferred Teachers Salaries 
Professional & Technical Services 
Reserve Fund 



208, 000 
125, 000 



152 , 625 



106, 527 
25, 000 
140, 000 



1, 000 
13 , 900 
12 , 000 
10, 000 



7, 500 
1, 500 



TOTAL 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 



3 , 976, 008 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$3 , 976 , 008 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve and that the 
sum of $33,589 be transferred from Water Dept. - Available Funds and 
applied to the Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance Account and the sum 
of $194 , 183 be transferred from Water Dept. - Available Funds and 
applied to Unclassified and Reserve - Employee Health and Life 
Insurance Account and the sum of $6,427 be transferred from Water 
Department - Available Funds and applied to Unclassified and Reserve - 
Medicare Employers ' Contribution Account and that the remaining balance 
of $3 , 741, 809 be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 20,431, 869 

ARTICE 6. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including 
but not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or 
turn in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof : 

(a) Police Department 

Purchase of five (5) replacement police cruisers. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $107,420 for the purchase of five 
(5) replacement police cruisers for the Police Department, and further 
to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced vehicles." 
The Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so 
voted, unanimously, $107,420 . 

(b) Police Department 

Purchase of mobile data system. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $51 , 610 for the purchase of a 
mobile data system for the Police Department." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, 
$51, 610 . 



(c) 



Public Buildings Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement van truck and one (1) replacement pick- 
up truck. 



Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $20 , 760 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement van truck for the Public Buildings Department and the sum 
of $14 , 035 for the purchase of one (1) replacement pick-up truck for 
the Public Buildings Department and further to authorize the sale or 
turn in, if any, of said replaced equipment." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, 
$34, 795 . 

(d) School Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement mini -van. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $26,634 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement ten (10) passenger van for the School Department, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
equipment." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, unanimously, $26 , 634 . 

(e) Fire Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement articulating boom (bucket assembly) for 
fire alarm truck. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $29, 000 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement articulating boom/bucket assembly for the fire alarm truck 
for the Fire Department, and further to authorize the sale or turn in, 
if any, of said replaced equipment." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $2 9,000 . 

(f ) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement one ton dump truck. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $33,298 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement one ton dump truck for the Department of Public Works, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
equipment." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded 
and so voted, unanimously, $33,2 98 . 

(g) Public Works Department 

Purchase of one (1) replacement bucket truck including lift and crane. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $84,791 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement bucket truck including lift and crane for the Department of 
Public Works and further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of 
said replaced equipment." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $84,791 . 

(h) Public Works Department 

Purchase of two (2) replacement snow plows with central hydraulic 
system change over. 



-143- 



Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by- 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $19,000 for the purchase of two (2) 
replacement snow plows with central hydraulic system change over for 
the Department of Public Works, and further to authorize the sale or 
turn in, if any, of said replaced equipment." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, 
$19, 000 . 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace a section of roof at the Wilmington High School and to 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $97,600 to replace a section of 
roof at the Wilmington High School . " Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $97,600 . 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to replace windows in the North Intermediate and West Intermediate 
Schools and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $10 , 000 to replace windows in the 
North Intermediate and West Intermediate Schools." Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously, $10,000 . 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to reconstruct the Shawsheen School soccer fields and to determine how 
the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $215 , 000 for the purpose of 
reconstructing the Shawsheen School soccer fields." Motion seconded 
and so voted, unanimously, $215,000 . 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to install a granite monument on the Town Common in recognition of 
Wilmington veterans including landscaping, walkway replacement and the 
installation of benches and to determine how the same shall be raised whether 
by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $25,000 to install a granite 
monument on the Town Common together with landscaping, walkway 
replacement and the installation of benches for the purpose of 
recognizing the contributions of Wilmington veterans." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously, $25,000 . 



-144- 



JF.TICII 11. To see if the town will vote to raise ; 
cr.ey zzr zr.e rurpcse of reconstructing the North 
crazed zr. ::iiilesex Avenue for the ouroose of est a.: 



:e a sum of 
ir.c: Area 



is zeze-~z~ec. oy zrze t : r. 
.T.etr.er by taxation, trar. 
■urthsr to authorize the 
ir.erecf and also to authc 
-air.tain parking meters al 
lezzzc-s 22A through 2 22 a 
relaricr. theretc. 



rer, zz: 



rize 



cr-Jcir.ation thereof; ar.d 



Motior. hy -■. 
taxstLcr"- ar.; 



rocria: 



:ar.-:ir.g 



:y XToprove-er.zs zz zr.e par.-.ir.g _ct. 
: have the par-:ir.r '_zz -z ar.i r_r.r.ir.g 
,ill be dc-e as tc :t-er iss.es cc'cer: 
seconded ar.d sc vrted _r.ar.i-ously, $32 



SCI ; 



:em. 



ARTICLE 13. Tc s 

money for the tur 
Works garage ar.d 
taxatitr trar.sfe: 
relaticr. thereto. 



will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 

illation of an oil separator at the Public 

the same shall be raised, whether by 
: ar.v combinatior. thereof; or do ar.-.thir.cr in 



Motion hy yi; 
taxatitr. art 
purchasirg a: 
Works caraae 



"tte to raise by 
'ttse of 



■.er.ts ar.o excenses 



145- 




i 



Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the town vote to transfer from 
the Fiscal Year 1999 budget, the sum of $45,000 from Fire Salary - 
Privates; the sum of $20,000 from Public Works - Personnel Services - Snow 
and Ice Extra Help/Overtime; and the sum of $68,613 from Public Works - 
Contractual Services Snow and Ice Miscellaneous Services, the entire 
amount being $133,613 , to the following Fiscal Year 1999 accounts: 



Fire - Salary Deputy Chief $ 28,613 

Fire - Salary Overtime 45,000 
Public Works - Personnel Services Highway 20,000 
Unclassified and Reserve - Salary 

Adjustments and Other Costs 40,000 

$133,613 



Town Manager explained the need for these transfers. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $133,613 . 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #11) To see if the town will vote to accept as town 
ways, the layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen (M.G.L. Chapter 82 as amended) 
and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the 
"Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of 
Wilmington, Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds (M.N.R.D.), copies of which are on file in the office 
of the Town Clerk and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain or accept as a gift such land, slope and drainage or other easements 
as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine 
how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of constructing 
said ways and for the payment of any damages from the taking of land and 
slope easements and other easements or other related costs therefore: 

a. Aspen Drive - From Russell Road a distance of 320 feet, more or less, 
northwesterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Aspen Drive and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 194, Plan 29, on June 3, 1997, and 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc., 
dated January 22, 1999. 

b. Avon Street - From Avery Street a distance of 320 feet, more or less 
easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Avon Street Extension and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 189, Plan 78, on September 15, 1995, and 
as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Hayes Engineering 
Inc., dated August 31, 1998. 

c. Bailey Road - From Aldrich Road a distance of 538 feet, more or less, 
southeasterly to Bailey Road, as shown on subdivision plans entitled 
Home Park Plan 2 and Plan 3 and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 19, Plans 36 and 37, on January 8, 1903, 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by H. R. Gillam, 
P.E., Town Engineer, dated February 1, 1999. 



-146- 



Birch Road - From Birch Road a distance of 345 feet, more or less, 
easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Ashley Estates and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Pi an Book 191, Plan 135, on August 1, 1996, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana F. Perkins, Inc., 
dated November 10, 1997. 

Cherokee Lane - From Woburn Street a distance of 812 feet, more or 
less, easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Cherokee Estates and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 184, Plan 81, on March 11, 
1994, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc. dated September 24, 1998. 

Elizabeth Drive - From Butters Row a distance of 1,348 feet, more or 
less, southeasterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Laurel Woods and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 194, Plan 129, on August 1, 1997, 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Troy, Mede & 
Associates, dated January 5, 1999. 

Faulkner Avenue - From Faulkner Avenue a distance of 125 feet, more or 
less, northeasterly to a dead end, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Faulkner Avenue (unrecorded) , endorsed by the Planning 
Board on November 15, 1994 and as shown on a street acceptance plan 
prepared by George B. Sheehan, R.L.S., dated June 7, 1996. Location of 
Faulkner Avenue is as shown on Land Court Plan 6036-E, received at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds for registration on July 26, 1922, 
filed with Certificate #1896 3 Reg. Book 12, Page 211. 

Marion Street - From Marion Street a distance of 1,133 feet, more or 
less, southeasterly to Marion Street (unaccepted), as shown on a 
definitive subdivision plan entitled Marion Street III and recorded at 
the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 192, Plan 106, on 
November 7, 1996, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by 
H-Star Engineering, Inc., dated June 29, 1998, revised August 17, 1998. 

Serenoa Lane - From Woburn Street a distance of 600 feet, more or less, 
westerly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Countiry Oaks and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds, Plan Book 191, Plan 8, on April 18, 1996, and as shown on a 
street acceptance plan prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc., dated 
September 17, 1998. 

Somerset Place - From Mystic Avenue a distance of 878 feet, more or 
less, easterly through a cul-de-sac, as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Somerset Estates and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 189, Plan 64, on September 
7, 1995, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Dana F. 
Perkins, Inc., dated November 19, 1996. 

Wakefield Avenue - From Buckingham Street a distance of 355 feet, more 
of less, easterly to a dead end, as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Extension of Wakefield Avenue and recorded at the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 190, Plan 93, on January 
31, 1996, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by K. J. 
Miller Co., Inc., dated December 2, 1996; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 



-147- 



Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to accept as 
town ways, the layout of the following described streets, as 
recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen (M.G.L. 
Chapter 82 as amended) , and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans 
approved in accordance with the 'Rules and Regulations governing the 
Subdivision of Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts,' and 
which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds 
(M.N.R.D.), copies of which are on file in the office of the Town Clerk 
and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain or 
accept as a gift such land, slope and drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to vote to 
raise by taxation the sum of $3 00 for the purpose of constructing said 
ways and for the payment of any damages from taking the land and slope 
easements and other easements or other costs therefore." 

Motion reads the same as above, deleting the following streets, Marion 
Street and Somerset Place, and adding cost of $300. Planning Board 
recommends approval . Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously, $300 . 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #13) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money from available funds for the Department of Public 
Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to raise and 
appropriate from FY- 1999 Chapter 90 Construction Funds an additional 
$8 , 732 , bringing the entire appropriation to the amount of $585,732 ; 
and further to raise and appropriate from FY-2000 Chapter 90 
Construction Funds the sum of $585,732 to the Department of Public 
Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 17. (drawn as #33) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of purchasing replacement weapons 
for the Police Department and further to authorize the sale or trade of 
weapons presently assigned to the Police Department and to determine how the 
same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
the Town Manager to purchase replacement firearms for the Police 
Department by trading presently used firearm equipment in exchange 
therefor." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18. (drawn as #21) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee which shall arrange 
and have charge of said observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a 
committee which shall arrange and have charge of said observance." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously, $5,000. 



-148- 



ARTICLE 19. (drawn as #28) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $750 each (a total of $2,250) for the purpose of 
renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post 2458 of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable 
headquarters for the Wilmington Chapter; 

c. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of the 
American Legion; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney reads same as above. Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $750 
each, a total of $2,250 . 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn as #30) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen work 
opportunities for services rendered to the town in accordance with the Town' 
Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate a sum of $10 , OOP for the purpose of providing 
senior citizen work opportunities for services rendered to the town in 
accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously, $10,000 . 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn as #32) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of conducting a site feasibility 
analysis for the expansion of the public library building and developing 
architectural design schematics for the library building program; and to 
determine how the same shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing, or any combination thereof; and to authorize the Board of Library 
Trustees and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for and accept any federal o 
state aid and to receive gifts which may be available as contributions to be 
applied to the cost of the program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purpose of 
conducting a site feasibility analysis for the expansion and/or 
relocation of the public library building and to develop architectural 
design schematics for the library building program; and further to 
authorize the Board of Library Trustees and/or the Selectmen to apply 
for and accept any federal or state aid and to receive gifts which may 
be available as contributions to be applied to the cost of such 
program." Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously, $20,000 . 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to authorize its 
Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance agreement or 
agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years pursuant to M.G.L., 
Chapter 44, Section 53F; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-149- 



Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
its Treasurer/Collector to enter into a compensating balance agreement 
or agreements for a term not to exceed three fiscal years pursuant to 
M.G.L., Chapter 44, Section 53F." Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn as #35) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without 
further appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United States Federal 
Government under any Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under any State Grant Program; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, 
without further appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United 
Sates Federal Government under any Federal Grant Program and the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State Grant Program." Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

ARTICLE 24. (drawn as #12) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue, in force, the Revolving Fund as established at 
the Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. 
Chapter 44, Section 53E!^ for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and further to 
establish a spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer to continue, in force, the Revolving Fund as 
established at the Special Town Meeting of December 4, 1995 in 
accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E^A for a Compost Bin 
Recycling Program and further to establish a spending limit of not more 
than $4,500 for said account." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, $4,500 . 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn as #26) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer to continue, in force, the Revolving Fund as established at 
the Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
44, Section 53EM for the purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental 
Trust or the Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair 
and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; and 
additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other loan repayments to 
the town from property owners participating in said program and further to 
establish a spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the Town Treasurer to continue, in force, the Revolving 
Fund as established at the Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1995 
in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section S3E^A for the 
purpose of receiving monies from the Environmental Trust or the 
Department of Environmental Protection to be used for the repair 
and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5; 
and additionally, to receive monies from betterments and other 



-150- 



loan repayments to the town from property owners participating in 
said program and further to establish a spending limit of not 
more than $50,000 for said account." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, 
$50, OOP ■ 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #25) To see if the town will vote to appropriate a 
sum of money for further constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a 
new Public Safety Building, including costs incidental and related thereto, 
and to determine how the same shall be raised whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to raise the sum 
of $2,000,000 to supplement the appropriation previously raised at the 
Annual Town Meeting held on April 26, 1997 for the purpose of 
constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a new Public Safety 
Building, including all costs incidental and related thereto, and 
further to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, to borrow $2,000,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7 (3) of the General Laws or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the town therefore." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously, 
$2,000,000 . 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn as #36) To see if the town will vote to transfer a sum 
of money from the Main Street Sewer Account which was appropriated at the 
Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1989, for the purpose of providing 
additional engineering services for the Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project, 
being a similar project of an equal or longer period of time, all in 
accordance with General Laws Chapter 44; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move that the town vote to 
authorize the transfer of $56 , 000 from the Main Street Sewer Account 
which was appropriated at the Annual Town Meeting of April 22, 1989, 
said funds being surplus after completion of the project, to the Route 
38 Corridor Sewer Project for additional engineering services, said 
project being similar and of an equal or longer period of time." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimous ly , $56,000 . 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to amend the action 
taken in Article 21 as contained in the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting 
held on April 27, 1996 which authorized the town to borrow, under the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, the sum of $1,000,000 for the design 
and construction of a raw water main from the Shawsheen Avenue wellfield to 
the Butters Row Water Treatment Plant including all appropriate pumping 
station upgrades by rescinding such authorization to borrow; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the town vote to rescind the 
authorization to borrow, the sum of $1,000,000 for the design and 
construction of a raw water main from the Shawsheen Avenue wellfield to 
the Butters Row Water Treatment Plant, said project having been 
constructed without the necessity of said borrowing." Town Manager was 
pleased to report that this project was done within the budget and 
borrowing was not needed. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 



ARTICLE 29. (drawn as #27) To see if the town will vote to name the new 
Public Safety Building to be located on the corner of Church Street and 
Adelaide Street in honor of Rocco V. DePasquale in recognition of his many 
years of devoted public service to the citizens of the Town of Wilmington; or 
do anything in relation thereto. Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move to pass 
over this article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #10) To see if the town will vote to direct the Board 
of Health to investigate the fluoridation of the Town's water supply in 
accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 111, Section 89C; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Eugene Kritter, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Board of Health to investigate the fluoridation of the town's water 
supply and to report the results of said investigation to the Annual 
Town Meeting to be held April 22, 2000." He explained that 
Massachusetts General Law allows a majority of the Board of Health to 
vote to order fluoridation of the town's water supply. Wilmington had 
fluoride in the water and then it was voted out by the town in 1962 . 
Many towns in the area have fluoride in their water. Dr. James 
Ficociello, Board of Health Chairman, recommended we approve this 
article so that we can study the question further. Many residents 
spoke as to the concerns both for and against fluoride. This article 
will allow a complete study and public hearings with experts to answer 
questions. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Motion seconded 
and so voted. Yes 107 No 48. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to accept as a gift, purchase or take by Right of Eminent 
Domain, for the purpose of highway drainage, an easement over, under, on and 
through the land now or formerly of Frances G. Dec, 2 05 Salem Street 
(Assessor's Map 81, Parcel 3), at the location as shown on a plan prepared by 
the Town Engineer and on file in the office of the Town Clerk, and to install 
drainage and do all acts incidental thereto and further to appropriate any 
sum of money therefore; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move to pass over this article." 
Seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to amend General Law 
Chapter 40A, Sections 3 and 5 in such a manner which shall serve to 
strengthen a municipality's local control over the siting of a child care 
facility; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the town vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to petition the State Legislature and request the amendment 
of General Law Chapter 40A, Sections 3 and 5 in order to strengthen a 
municipality' s local control over the siting of child care facilities 
and further to request the town' s legislative delegation to draft 
legislation to accomplish the same." Finance Committee recommends 
approval . Planning Board recommends approval . The Planning Board 
supports increased local control of the siting of child care facilities 
in the interest of good planning. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously . 



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ARTICLE 33. (drawn as #14) To see if the town will vote to amend the By- 
laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Section 4 of Chapter 5 by- 
deleting "Temporary political signs are hereby restricted in size to six (6) 
square feet of surface area. One free standing sign of the same size may be 
placed on private property not less than twenty-five (25) feet from the edge 
of the nearest paved roadway. " and substituting the following, "Temporary 
political signs may be placed on private property, the size and location of 
which shall not serve to obstruct the sight of motorists and pedestrians 
using or occupying the public ways and/or the right of access thereto."; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, "I move that the town vote to amend the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Section 4 of 
Chapter 5 by deleting "Temporary political signs are hereby restricted 
in size to six (6) square feet of surface area. One free standing sign 
of the same size may be placed on private property not less than 
twenty-five (25) feet from the edge of the nearest paved roadway. " and 
substituting the following, "Temporary political signs may be placed on 
private property, the size and location of which shall not serve to 
obstruct the sight of motorists and pedestrians using or occupying the 
public ways and/or the right of access thereto." Finance Committee 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn as #20) To see if the town will vote to amend the By- 
laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, by adding to 
Chapter 5, Section 43 as follows: 

Municipal Water Supply Use Restriction 

Section 1 Authority 

This By-law is adopted by the town under its police powers to protect public 
health and welfare and its powers under M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 21 et seq . 
and implements the Town's authority to regulate water use pursuant to M.G.L. 
Chapter 41, Section 69B. This By-law also implements the town's authority 
under M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 41A, conditioned upon a declaration of water 
supply emergency issued by the Department of Environmental Protection. 

Section 2 Purpose 

The purpose of this By-law is to protect, preserve and maintain the public 
health, safety and welfare whenever there is in force a State of Water Supply 
Conservation or State of Water Supply Emergency by providing for enforcement 
of any duly imposed restrictions, requirements, provisions or conditions 
imposed by the town or by the Department of Environmental Protection. 

Section 3 Definitions 
Person 

Shall mean any individual, corporation, trust, partnership or association, or 
other entity. 

State of Water Supply Emergency 

Shall mean a State of Water Supply Emergency declared by the Department of 
Environmental Protection under M.G.L. Chapter 21G, Section 15-17. 

State of Water Supply Conservation 

Shall mean a State of Water Supply Conservation declared by the town pursuant 
to Section 4 of this By-law. 



-153- 



Water Users or Water Consumers 

Shall mean all public and private users of the town' s public water system, 
irrespective of any person's responsibility for billing purposes for water 
used at any particular facility. 

Section 4 Declaration of State of Water Supply Conservation 

The town, or its agent, through its Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, 
may declare a State of Water Supply Conservation upon a determination by a 
majority vote of the Board that a shortage of water exists and conservation 
measures are appropriate to ensure an adequate supply of water to all water 
consumers. Public notice of a State of Water Conservation shall be given 
under Section 5 of this By-law before it may be enforced. 

Section 5 Restricted Water Uses 

A declaration of a State of Water Supply Conservation shall include one or 
more of the following restrictions, conditions, or requirements limiting the 
use of water as necessary to protect the water supply. The applicable 
restrictions, conditions or requirements shall be included in the public 
notice required under Section 6. 

a) Odd/Even Day Outdoor Watering: Outdoor watering by water users with 
odd numbered addresses is restricted to odd numbered days . Outdoor 
watering by water users with even numbered addresses is restricted to 
even numbered days . 

b) Outdoor Watering Ban: Outdoor watering is prohibited. 

c) Outdoor Water Hours : Outdoor watering is permitted only during daily 
periods of low demand, to be specified in the declaration of a State of 
Water Supply Conservation and public notice thereof. 

d) Filling Swimming Pools: Filling of swimming pools is prohibited. 

e) Automatic Sprinkler Use: The use of automatic sprinkler systems is 
prohibited. 

Section 6 Public Notification of a State of Water Supply Conservation; 
Notification of PEP 

Notification of any provision, restriction, requirement or condition imposed 
by the town as part of a State of Water Supply Conservation shall be 
published in a newspaper of general circulation within the town, or by such 
other means reasonably calculated to reach and inform all users of water of 
the State of Water Supply Conservation. Any restriction imposed under 
Section 5 shall not be effective until such notification is provided. 
Notification of the State of Water Supply Conservation shall also be 
simultaneously provided to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection. 

Section 7 Termination of a State of Water Supply Conservation; Notice 
A State of Water Supply Conservation may be terminated by a majority vote of 
the Board of Water Commissioners, upon a determination that the water supply 
shortage no longer exists. Public notification of the termination of a State 
of Water Supply Conservation shall be given in the same manner required by 
Section 6. 



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Section 8 State of Water Supply Emergency; Compliance with PEP Orders 
Upon notification to the public that a declaration of a State of Water Supply 
Emergency has been issued by the Department of Environmental Protection, no 
person shall violate any provision, restriction, requirement, condition of 
any order approved or issued by the Department intended to bring about an end 
to the State of Emergency. 

Section 9 Penalties 

Any person violating this by-law shall be liable to the town in the amount of 
$50 for the first violation and $100 for each subsequent violation. Fines 
shall be recovered by indictment, or on complaint before the District Court, 
or by non-criminal disposition in accordance with Section 21D of Chapter 40 
of the general laws. Each day of violation shall constitute a separate 
offense . 

Section 10 Severability 

The invalidity of any portion or provision of this by-law shall not 
invalidate any other portion or provision thereof; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, reads the same as above. 
Superintendent of the Water Department, Michael Woods, explained that 
this article will give the town the authority to restrict unnecessary 
water use. The regulation will be advertised and the town will have 
the authority to fine violators. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35. (drawn as #31) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by taking the 
following actions : 

(1) Delete subsection 5.3.1 in its entirety and substitute the following: 

5.3.1 Setback of Structures - Unless otherwise specified in this by- 
law, no structure shall be located within any setback area except: 
Storage sheds no larger than 120 square feet and one story high, when 
located at a point along the rear lot line, may be placed within ten 
(10) feet of side and rear lot lines; walls and fences no more than 
eight (8) feet high; uncovered steps, ramps and terraces; cornices and 
eaves not extending more than 18 inches; signs and lighting facilities; 
mail boxes and flagpoles; underground storage tanks/septic systems; 
accessory facilities associated with the provision of utilities such as 
drains and wells; and similar structures. 

In the case of corner lots, no building or structure including fences 
shall be erected and no vegetation may be maintained between a plane 
one foot above curb level and a plane seven feet above curb level in 
the triangular area bounded by the sideline of the intersecting street 
rights of way and a straight line connecting points on sidelines 25 
feet from the point of intersection of side street rights of way. 

In any district, no building need provide a greater front yard than the 
average front yard on the adjoining side lots. In determining such 
average, a vacant lot shall be considered as conforming to the required 



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Ml 



front yard. Side and rear yards may be verified by special permit from 
the Board of Appeals provided in each such case the Board of Appeals 
finds circumstances relating to the shape or topography of the land 
which do not affect generally the zoning district in which it is 
located; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, reads the same as above. Motion by Scott 
Garrant of Planning Board, "I move to amend the above article to read, 
*may be placed not closer than ten (10) feet' in place of 'within ten 
(10) feet'." Vote was then taken on the amended article. So voted. 
This change in the by-law was proposed by Building Inspector, Daniel 
Paret to simplify requirements for residents to erect a small shed on 
their property. Planning Board recommends approval. Motion as amended 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn as #16) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by amending 
Section 5.3.4 Hammerhead Lots by taking the following actions: 

(1) Delete Section 5.3.4 Hammerhead Lots in its entirety and replace it 
with the following: 

5.3.4 Hammerhead Lots - In the residential districts hammerhead lots 
may be authorized by special permit from the Board of Appeals provided 
the Board of Appeals finds that the safeguards provided for the 
particular site are adequate for public safety, welfare and 
convenience, and subject to the following special permit criteria: 

5.3.4.1 Minimum lot area shall be 40,000 square feet in the 
Residential 10 and Residential 20 Districts, and 80,000 square feet in 
the Residential 60 District. 

5.3.4.2 Minimum lot frontage shall be 40 feet. 

5.3.4.3 The lot shall contain a minimum 150 foot circle within which 
the dwelling shall be located. 

5.3.4.4 Minimum width shall be 40 feet at all points between the 
sideline of the street along which the frontage of the lot is measured 
and the nearest point of the 150 foot dwelling location circle. Such 
width shall be measured along lines which are parallel to the street 
sideline . 

5.3.4.5 In all cases the nearest point of any dwelling or structure 
shall be set back 40 feet from all lot lines. 

5.3.4.6 No more than two hammerhead lots shall have contiguous 
frontage; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James L. Diorio, Chairman Planning Board, reads same as above 
motion. Planning Board recommends approval. This amendment will close 
a loophole in the existing by-law and ensure that hammerhead lots 
maintain a minimum width of 40 feet. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 



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ARTICLE 37. (drawn as #19) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by amending 
Section 6.2 Flood Plain District by taking the following actions: 

1. In Section 6.2.2.1, delete the date January 18, 1989 and substitute the 
date June 2, 1999; and delete the phrase "Zone A, AH, AO, Al-30, A99, 
V, Vl-30 and the FEMA Flood Boundary & Floodway Map dated January 18, 
1989, both maps which indicate the regulatory flood plain" and 
substitute the phrase "Zone A, AE, AH, AO, A99 and V, which indicates 
the 100-year regulatory flood plain and the regulatory floodway." 

2. In Section 6.2.2.2 (a) delete the phrase "and Al-30." 

3. In Section 6.2.2.2 (b) delete the phrase "within unnumbered A zones" 
and substitute the phrase "within Zone A. " 

4. In Section 6.2.3 delete the phrase "Flood Boundary and Floodway Map" 
and substitute the phrase "FIRM Map." 

5. In Section 6.2.6.1 (c) delete the phrase "unnumbered A zones" and 
substitute the phrase "Zone A." 

6. In Section 6.2.7.1 delete the phrase "Zone A, AO, AH, Al-30, AE, A99, 
Vl-30, VE or V" and substitute the phrase "Zone A, AO, AH, AE, A99, VE 
or V. " 

7. In Section 6.2.7.5 add the sentence, "For maps done in 1999 and later, 
information previously found on the Flood Boundary and Floodway Map is 
incorporated in the FIRM Map and the Flood Boundary and Floodway Map 
has been eliminated." 

8. In Section 6.2.7.11 delete the phrase "and shown on an FHBM or FIRM as 
Zone A, AO, Al-30, AE, A99, AH, V, Vl-30, VE" and substitute the phrase 
"and shown on a FIRM as Zone A, AO, AE, A99, AH, V or VE . " 

9. In Section 6.2.7.17 delete the phrase "Zone A-1 - A-30 and"; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James L. Diorio, Chairman Planning Board, reads the same as 
above. This is a housekeeping article, clarifying our zoning for 
Federal standards, which is necessary for continued eligibility for 
flood hazard insurance for Wilmington property owners. Planning Board 
recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn as #22) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and the associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
Section 6.6 Groundwater Protection District in its entirety and replace it 
with the following text: 

6.6 Groundwater Protection District 

6.6.1 Purpose - The groundwater underlying the town is an important 

resource supplying drinking water to inhabitants of Wilmington. Surrounding 
communities rely upon Wilmington to protect their groundwater. 



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Accidental spills and discharges of petroleum products, other hazardous 
materials and sewage discharge have repeatedly threatened the quality of 
groundwater supplies throughout Massachusetts, posing potential public health 
and safety hazards as well as threatening economic losses to affected 
communities . 

The purpose of this Groundwater Protection District is to: 

a) Promote the health, safety and general welfare of the community by 
ensuring an adequate quality and quantity of drinking water for the 
residents, institutions and businesses of the Town of Wilmington. 

b) Preserve and protect existing sources of drinking water supplies; 

c) Conserve the natural resources of the town; and 

d) Prevent temporary and/or permanent contamination of the environment. 

6.6.2 Groundwater Protection District - The Groundwater Protection 
District (GWPD) shall be delineated on the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington and shall be superimposed over any other district established by 
the by-law. The GWPD is the Zone II approved by the Department of 
Environmental Protection for Wilmington and surrounding communities as may be 
amended from time to time. It is based upon a detailed compilation of 
subsurface data, a limited field program and development of a town-wide 
groundwater flow model. Where the lots are split by the Groundwater 
Protection District boundary, this by-law shall apply only to that portion of 
the lot that is within the district. 

6.6.3 Applicability - The Groundwater Protection District shall apply 
to all new construction, reconstruction, or expansion of existing buildings 
and new or expanded uses. Applicable activities/uses in a portion of one of 
the underlying zoning districts which fall within the Groundwater Protection 
District must additionally comply with the requirements of this district. 
Uses prohibited in the underlying zoning districts shall not be permitted in 
the Groundwater Protection District. 

6.6.4 District Boundary Disputes - If the location of the District 
boundary in relation to a particular parcel is in doubt, resolution of 
boundary disputes shall be through a Special Permit application of the 
Special Permit Granting Authority (SPGA) . Any application for a special 
permit for this purpose shall be accompanied by adequate documentation. 

The burden of proof shall be upon the owner (s) of the land to show where the 
bounds should be located. At the request of the owner (s), the town may 
engage a professional engineer, hydrologist, geologist, or soil scientist to 
determine more accurately the boundaries of the district with respect to 
individual parcels of land, and may charge the owner (s) for the cost of the 
investigation . 

6.6.5 Prohibited Uses - Within a Groundwater Protection District, the 
following uses are specifically prohibited: 

6.6.5.1 Sanitary landfills and open dumps. Nothing in these regulations 

shall prevent the operation of a municipal recycling facility. 



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6.6.5.2 Land application, landfilling and above ground storage of sludge 

and septage, unless such storage is in compliance with 310 CMR 32.30 and 310 
CMR 3 2.31. 



6.6.5.3 



Automobile graveyards and junkyards 



6.6.5.4 Stockpiling and disposal of snow and ice containing deicing 

chemicals if brought in from outside the Groundwater Protection District 



6.6.5.5 
premises 



Dry cleaning establishments where the dry cleaning is done on the 



6.6.5.6 Facilities that generate, treat, store or dispose of hazardous 
waste subject to M.G.L. 21C and 310 CMR 30.000, except for the following: 

a) Very small quantity generators as defined under 310 CMR 30.000; 

b) Household hazardous waste centers and events under 310 CMR 3 0.3 90; 

c) Waste oil retention facilities required by M.G.L. Chapter 21, Section 
52 A; 

d) Water remediation treatment works approved by DEP for the treatment of 
contaminated ground or surface waters . 

6.6.5.7 Non-sanitary wastewater treatment or disposal works that are 
subject to 314 CMR 5.00 including privately owned sewage treatment 
facilities, except the following: 

a) The replacement or repair of an existing system that will not result in 
a design capacity greater than the design capacity of the existing 
system; 

b) Treatment works approved by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection designed for the treatment of contaminated 
groundwater . 

6.6.6 Conditional Prohibited Uses and Activities - The following land 

uses and activities are prohibited unless designed in accordance with the 
specified performance standards. 

6.6.6.1 Storage of deicing chemicals unless such storage, including 
loading areas, is within a structure designed to prevent the generation of 
contaminated run-off or leachate. 

6.6.6.2 Storage of pesticides unless such storage is within a building or 
structure that will prevent an accidental release onto or below the land 
surface . 

6.6.6.3 Storage of commercial fertilizers and soil conditioners, in 
amounts greater than for normal household use, unless such storage is within 
a structure with an impermeable cover and liner designed to prevent the 
generation of contaminated run-off or leachate. 

6.6.6.4 Commercial stockpiling of animal manure unless within a structure 
with an impermeable cover and liner designed to prevent the generation of 
contaminated run-off or leachate. 



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6.6.6.5 Earth removal, unless the final grading is greater than four (4) 
feet above the historical high groundwater mark as determined from monitoring 
wells and historical water table fluctuation data compiled by the United 
States Geological Survey within forty-five (45) days of removal. This does 
not include excavations for the construction of building foundations or the 
installation of utility works. All earth removal shall comply with Chapter 
5, Section 32 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised and other applicable regulations. 

6.6.6.6 Spill control provisions must be installed in the vicinity of 
chemical or fuel delivery points. 

6.6.6.7 Storage of liquid hazardous materials, as defined in M.G.L. 
Chapter 21E, and liquid petroleum products, unless such storage is: 

a) Above-ground level; and 

b) On an impervious surface; and 

c) Either 

(i) in container (s) or above-ground container (s) within a building; 
or ; 

(ii) outdoors in a covered container (s) or above-ground tank(s) in an 
area that has a containment system designed to hold either 10% of 
the total possible storage capacity of ail containers, or 110% of 
the largest container's storage capacity, whichever is greater. 

However, these storage requirements shall not apply to the replacement of 
existing tanks or systems for the keeping, dispensing or storing of gasoline 
provided the replacement is performed in a manner consistent with state and 
local requirements. 

6.6.6.8 Storage of corrodible or dissolvable materials, unless in a 
structure with an impermeable cover and liner designed to prevent the 
generation of contaminated run-off or leachate. 

6.6.6.9 A closed vapor recovery system is required for each structure 
which allows the evaporation of hazardous materials into its interior to 
prevent discharge of contaminated condensate into the groundwater. 

6.6.6.10 Disposal of hazardous wastes to be generated in quantities 
greater than those associated with normal household use (except as prohibited 
in Section 6.6.5.6), unless the applicant for a building permit can 
demonstrate the availability and feasibility of disposal methods which are in 
conformance with M.G.L. , Chapter 21C, amended. 

6.6.6.11 Drainage. All run-off from impervious surfaces shall be drained 
in a manner designed to prevent the contamination of groundwater and to 
recharge on site, to the extent possible. All run-off prior to discharge 
shall be preceded by oil, grease and sedimentation traps in accordance with 
the standard design of the Department of Public Works, to facilitate the 
removal of contaminants, where, in the opinion of the Town Engineer, such 
traps are warranted by reason of site conditions and design considerations. 
Dry wells shall be used only where other methods are not possible and shall 
also be preceded by oil, grease and sedimentation traps to facilitate removal 



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of contaminants. Roof run-off from buildings may be drained into dry wells 
without traps unless the roof contains exposed mechanical equipment or is 
coated with asphalt. 

6.6.6.12 Car and truck -/.-ashes , unless connected to municipal se-vers . 

6.6.6.13 Self-service laundries, -unless connected tc municipal sewers. 

6.6.7 Special Perm.it L^ses - With the Groundwater Protection District 
the following uses shall be allowed only upon receipt of a special permit 
(unless prohibited in the underlying zoning district) : 

6.6.7.1 Golf courses, either private or public. 

6.6.7.2 Uses whose principal activity is m.edical, testing and research 
laboratories that dispose of biological, radioactive or chemical wastes. 

6.6.7.3 Metal plating, finishing or polishing establishments, electronic 
circuit boards manufacturing and furniture refinishing esrablishm.ents . 

6.6.7.4 Commercial photographic processing and commercial printing 
involving the use of volatile chemicals (other than xerographic 
reproduction) . 

6.6.7.5 Enlargem.ent or alreraricn of existing -ases that do not conform to 
the Groundwater Protection District. 

6.6.7.6 Those activities that involve the handling of toxic or hazardous 
materials in quantities greater than those associated with normal household 
use, permitted in the underlying zoning (except as prohibited under Section 
6.6.5.6). Such activities shall req'-ire a special perr.it tc prevent 
contamination of ground'^-ater . 

6.6.7.7 Any use that will render impervious more thsm 15% or 2,500 square 
feet or any lot, whichever is greater. A system for grovmdwater recharge 
must be provided which does net degrade groundwater quality. For non- 
residential uses, recharge shall be by stormwater infiltration basins or 
similar system, covered -.•.-ith natural vegetation, and dry -A-ells shall be used 
only where other methods are infeasible. For all non-residential uses, all 
such basins and wells shall be preceded by oil, grease and sediment traps tc 
facilitate removal of contamination. Any and all recharge areas shall be 
permanently maintained in full working order by the owner. 

6.6.7.8 The construction of dams or other wa^er bodies or courses, 
created for swimming, fishing, or other recreational or agricultural uses. 
Such activicies shall not adversely affect water quality or quantity. 

6.6.8 Special Perm.its 

6.6.8.1 Special Permit Granting Authority. The Special Permit Granting 

Authority (SPGA) under this by-law shall be the Zoning Board of Appeals. 
Special permits shall be granted in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, 
Section 9 and Section 8.5 of the Zoning By-law. Such special permits shall 
be granted if the SPGA determines, in conjunction with rhe other town 



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agencies indicated in Section 8.5.9, that the intent of this by-law, as well 
as its criteria, are met. In making such a determination, the SPGA shall 
give consideration to the simplicity, reliability and feasibility of the 
control measures proposed and the degree and threat to water quality which 
would result if the control measures fail. 

6.6.8.2 Special Permit Criteria. Special permits under Section 6.6.6.1 

shall be granted only if the SPGA determines that groundwater quality at the 
down gradient boundaries of the site will not be lowered in quality. 

6.6.9 Violations - Written notice of any violations of this by-law 
shall be provided by the Building Inspector to the owner of the premises with 
said notice specifying the nature of the violation (s) and a schedule of 
compliance, including cleanup of any spilled materials. This compliance 
schedule must be reasonable in relation to the public health hazard involved 
and the difficulty of compliance or finalization of a plan for longer-term 
compliance . 

Enforcement - This by-law shall be enforced by the Building Inspector or 
designated agent. 

6.6.10 Definitions 

6.6.10.1 Aquifer: A geologic formation, group of formations or part of a 
formation which contains sufficient saturated permeable material to yield 
potable groundwater to public or private wells. 

6.6.10.2 Automobile Graveyard: Any establishment or place of business 
which is maintained, used or operated for storing, keeping, buying or selling 
wrecked, scrapped, ruined or dismantled motor vehicles or motor vehicle 
parts . 

6.6.10.3 Commercial Fertilizer: Any substance containing one or more 
recognized plant nutrient (s) which is used for its plant nutrient content and 
which is designed for use or claimed to have value in promoting plant growth, 
except unmanipulated animal and vegetable manure, marl, lime, limestone, wood 
ashes and gypsum, and other products exempted by regulation of the 
commissioner . 

6.6.10.4 Cooling Water: The water discharged from any system of 
condensation, air conditioning, cooling, refrigeration, or other system of 
heat transfer. Non-Contact Cooling Water shall mean water used for cooling 
that does not come into direct contact with any raw material, intermediate 
product, and waste product or finished product. Contact Cooling Water shall 
mean waste used in a process for cooling purposes which has come in direct 
contact with the process reactants or products. 

6.6.10.5 Deicing Chemicals: Sodium chloride, calcium chloride, chemically 
treated abrasives or other chemicals used for the removal of snow or ice on 
roads . 

6.6.10.6 Groundwater: All water beneath the surface of the ground in a 
saturated zone, including perched groundwater. 

6.6.10.7 Groundwater Protection District: The zoning district defined to 
overlay other zoning districts in the Town of Wilmington. The groundwater 
protection district may include specifically designated recharge areas. 



5.6.10.8 
chs-ical , 



Hazardous /Toxic Karerial: Any substance or mixture of physical, 
cr infectious characteristics ccsing a signif iccmt , actual, or 
hazard to water supplies cr ccr.er hazards to human health if such 
cr Tixture vere discharged rc land cr a-er in the Town of 

Tcxic cr hazardous r.acerials ir.cl_de .-irhout limitation; 
craanic cheT.icals cecrcleu- crcducts, hea-'/v rr.etals, radioactive c: 



:cxic cr 



nazarccu: 
310 CT'Jl : 
cr-antiti« 



ir.aer .yassacr.userts Genera- laws 3 1 Cnapcers 21C anc 21E and 
:c, and also include such produces as solvents and thinners in 
areater chan ncrr.al household use . 



6.6 



Collection Centers: Events operated 



C . C . _ - . - . 

the crc-nd 



;r~.'icus Surcace: Materials or structure on ahc's 
does ncc allcA crecioieacion or surface wacer cc : 



_r _e_OA.' 
enecrace . 



6.6.10.11 Induscrial Xaste: .-jny sclic liquid or caseous '.-.■asces and 
wastewater exclusive cf sanitary =£^ age resulting fro- an industrial : 
manufacturing process or discharged fro- a cc--ercial, goverr.-ental or 

natural resources. 



6.6.10.12 Junkyard; 



!ss wnicn IS 



maintained, used or operated for storing, keeping buying or selling jvmk, or 
for the maintenance or coeraticn cf an autc-chile qravevard dur.o . 



application to the surface of soil by 
lar -eans, and/or mixing or working into the 
soil or beneath the surface of the scil sithin the root zone of the crop by 



6.6.10.13 land Application: 
spreading, spraying cr other s 



6.C.1C.14 leachable Wastes: 



:jecting cr otner si-i_ar -eans. 
:e materials, includmo solid -.vaste- 



determ.med z.' the 3uilding I: 
stcra::e considerations. 



-he consolidation of •.'.aste from one or more sources 



6.6.10.17 Pesticide: A substance or mixture cf substances intended for 
preventing, destroying, repelling or mitigating any pest, and any substance 
or mixture of substances intended for use as a plant regulatcr defoliant or 
desiccant . 



6.1C.15 Principal Activity: 



Any activity carriea on as part or a 



6.5.1C.19 ?-jblicly Ovmed Wastewater .reat-ent Plants: Any device or system 

sewage or industrial wastes of a liquid nature which is ov.-ned by a p-ublic 
entity. 



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6.6.10.20 Recharge Area: Any porous, permeable geologic deposits, 
especially, but not exclusively, deposits of stratified sand and gravel, 
through which water from any source drains into and replenishes an aquifer, 
and includes any wetland or body or surface water surrounded by or adjacent 
to such area, together with the watershed of any wetland or body of surface 
water adjacent to such area. 

6.6.10.21 Sanitary Landfill: A method of disposing of solid wastes on 
land . 

6.6.10.22 Septage : The liquid, solid and semi-solid content removed from 
privies, portable toilets, cesspools, holding tanks or other sewage waste 
receptacles . 

6.6.10.23 Sludge: The solid, semi-solid and liquid residue that results 
from a process of wastewater treatment or industrial process by-product. 
This residue does not include grit, screening, or grease and oil which are 
removed to the headworks of a facility. 

6.6.10.24 Soil Conditioner: Any manipulated substance or mixture of 
substances whose primary function is to modify the physical structure of 
soils so as to favorably influence plant growth. This does not include 
unmanipulated natural substances. 

6.6.10.25 Solid Wastes: Useless, unwanted or discarded solid materials 
with insufficient liquid content to be free flowing, including, but not 
limited to, rubbish, garbage, scrap materials, junk, refuse, inert fill 
material and landscape refuse. 

6.6.10.26 Very Small Quantity Generators: An operation that does limited 
generation of hazardous materials. The threshold quantities for a very small 
quantity generator are set forth in 310 CMR 30.353. 

6.6.10.27 Waste Oil Retention Facilities: These are facilities for 
collecting waste oil that are required for businesses that sell motor oils. 
They are required by M.G.L., Chapter 21, Section 52A, with standards set 
forth in 310 CMR 22.22(2) (a) (4) . 

6.6.10.2 8 Zone of Contribution: The area surrounding a pumping well that 
encompasses all areas or features that supply groundwater recharge to the 
well; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James L. Diorio, Planning Board, "I move that, motion reads 
same as above." This article presented by the Planning Board and Water 
Department. Lynn Duncan, Planning Director, explained that the 
Department of Environmental Protection requires this new by-law to 
provide increased protection for Wilmington's water supply. It amends 
the district, allows several additional uses, adds a new section and 
some changes in definitions. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Planning Board recommends approval. Motion voted. Yes 142 No 1. 



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ARTICLE 39. (drawn as #18) To see if the town will vote to accept the 
following: That the proposed public safety building that will house the 
Wilmington Police Department and Wilmington Fire Department be named the 
Wilmington Memorial Public Safety Building. This building would be dedicated 
to the memory of Wilmington Firemen Russell G. Pratt and Wilbur A. Sheldon 
who died during the performance of their duties while fighting a house fire 
near Silver Lake on September 11, 1927 and also to all past members of the 
Wilmington Police and Fire Departments in recognition of their many years of 
service to the town; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Paul Chalifour reads the same as above. Moderator, James 
Stewart, stated he will allow discussion on this article and Article 
29, which also asked the Town Meeting to name this same building after 
Rocco DePasquale . Paul Chalifour, a member of the Police Department, 
explained that with this article the name would be the Wilmington 
Memorial Public Safety Building, with a special designation of honor 
for the two Wilmington Fire Fighters, Russell G. Pratt and Wilbur A. 
Sheldon, who were killed in a fire September 11, 1927. They were call 
fire fighters and never honored in any special way. There should be no 
statute of limitations to honoring these men. It would also honor all 
deceased members of both Police and Fire who had served the community. 
Selectman, James Rooney, spoke of Rocco DePasquale, who was 
Wilmington's original "Good Guy". He supported both our Police and 
Fire and many other causes in the community, and also deserves this 
honor. Much discussion followed. Finance Committee recommends 
approval of this article. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 40. (drawn as #37) To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to preserve and maintain that building known as the Swain 
School to be used as a Cultural Center in the Wilmington Historical District; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Gerald O'Reilly, "I move that the town vote to instruct the 
Board of Selectmen to preserve and maintain that building known as the 
Swain School to be used as a Cultural Center in the Wilmington 
Historical District." Mr. O'Reilly is not asking for funds, only 
wishes the town to look into preserving and to study the possible uses 
for the Swain School. He stated it is already in the historical 
register. Paul Chalifour said the Historical Commission advocated the 
preservation of Swain School as long as it was feasible to the town. 
Town Manager, Michael Caira stated this building would need 2 1/2 
million dollars to refurbish. It makes little or no sense to tie up 
this valuable piece of property. Finance Committee recommends 
disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted. Voice vote wa's questioned. 
Vote then taken by tellers. Yes 44 No 98. Motion defeated. 

ARTICLE 41. (drawn as #9) To see if the town will vote to direct the Board 
of Selectmen to notify the MBTA and members of the Wilmington legislative 
delegation of the town's opposition to the proposed MBTA commuter rail 
parking facility in the town's center, and to further withhold support for 
the construction of any such facility that does not satisfy the conditions of 
a Planning Board site plan review; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the town vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to notify the MBTA and members of the Wilmington 
legislative delegation of the town's opposition to the proposed MBTA 
commuter rail parking facility in the town's center, and to further 



-165- 



withhold support for the construction of any such facility that does 
not satisfy the conditions of a Planning Board site plan review. " He 
stated that by passing this article, the MBTA will know that Wilmington 
residents want a say in what is done in the center. Many residents 
spoke on the need for a new train station and the improvement of the 
center of town, but not if it is just a parking lot. Handicapped 
accessibility was also questioned, as to the distance of travel to the 
train. The MBTA should have to present a site plan to the Planning 
Board. Representative Miceli supports the project and stated no 
developers want to be involved in improvements to the center. He 
stated $5.2 million has been approved for the center project. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Planning Board recommends approval. 
They have been opposed to the MBTA parking facility in the Town Center 
as currently proposed, since it is not the highest and best use for 
this land. Town Manager urged Town Meeting to support this article. 
Let the Town of Wilmington have a say in their destiny. Motion to move 
the question. So voted. Article as presented, seconded and so voted. 
Yes 156 No 25. 



ARTICLE 42. (drawn as #15) To 
Board of Selectmen to petition 
Massachusetts to amend and revi 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilm 
Amendments to the Constitution 
Section 81A of the Commonwealth 
creates and establishes a Chart 
by the voters of the Town of Wi 
appear on the ballot at the pol 
held in November of the year 2 
substantially as follows: 



see if the town will vote to authorize the 
the General Court of the Commonwealth of 
se its present Town Charter and By-laws of the 
ington pursuant to Article 89 of the 
and General Laws Chapter 4 3B and Chapter 41, 

of Massachusetts to a new Town Charter that 
er Commission and Planning Board to be elected 
Imington and further requests that a question 
Is of the next presidential election to be 
00, and the form of the question shall be 



"Shall this Town of Wilmington approve the new amended and revised Town 
Charter as recommended by the Charter Commission summarized below?" Yes or 
No; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mark Nelson, reads the same as above. Mr. Nelson at this 
time made a motion to have this article voted with secret ballot. Town 
Moderator explained the procedure. Motion defeated by voice vote. Mr. 
Nelson stated there are two ways to amend the charter, one is at Town 
Meeting and one is a referendum drive. He stated such a drive will be 
started if this article fails. Approval of this article will place the 
question of the election of the Planning Board on the November ballot 
of the year 2000, so that the 13,800 registered voters would have a 
chance to vote on this issue. Selectmen Michael McCoy, Robert Cain and 
Daniel Wandell spoke in opposition. Selectman James Rooney supports 
this article. Kevin MacDonald, a local builder, was critical of the 
Planning Board and urged support for this article. Motion to move the 
question. So voted. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Main 
motion seconded and so voted. Yes 9 No 151. Article defeated. 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn as #7) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to remove certain restrictions as described and voted upon 
by the adoption of Article 27 at the Annual Town Meeting of 1982 and as 
contained in a deed from the Town of Wilmington to Leo W. Campbell and 
Kathleen Campbell (Book 2571, Page 367) to allow the subdivision of a certain 
parcel of land as shown as Parcel 32 on Assessor's Map 54 bounded and 
described as follows: 



166- 




Southerly by Garden Avenue, two-hundred (200) feet; 
Westerly by St. Paul Street, one-hundred (100) feet; 
Northerly by Lots 535 and 502, two-hundred (200) feet; 
Easterly by Rhodes Street, one-hundred (100) feet; 

Being a lot containing 20,000 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled 
"Silver Lake Gardens Annex No. 1, Wilmington, MA," owned by J. W. Wilbur Co., 
Inc. December 2, 1918, scale one (1) inch equals eighty (80) feet, A. L. 
Eliot, C.E.; and further to authorize payment of the fair market value for 
the removal of this deed restriction as established by the Board of 
Assessors; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Campbell, "I move motion reads the same as above, but 
removing the words authorize payment of fair market value from motion." 
Town Moderator advised Mr. Campbell that according to our Town By-laws, 
this is the policy that now governs the town's interest in land. Fair 
market value set by Principal Assessor is $50,800 for lifting of the 
restriction. Finance Committee recommends approval. Planning Board 
recommends approval, subject to disposition at fair market value. 
After some discussion, motion seconded and so voted. Yes 139 No 6. 

ARTICLE 44. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
transfer of, care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described to the Selectmen of 
the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying 
the same, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 3 OB; and further 
that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such 
interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Disposition subject to reserving a fifty (50) foot Right 
of Way over the existing traveled way known as Paddock Street. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 50, Parcels 65 and 66; or do anything in 
relation thereto.. 

Letter was received from Robert J. Troy, petitioner to withdraw this article. 
Motion to pass over by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira. Seconded and so 
voted . 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #23) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of, care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed 
for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, 
all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the 
Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in 
the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 
3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 
Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 32, Parcels 8 and 9; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 



-167- 



ARTICLE 46. (drawn as #8) To see if the town will vote to authorize 
transfer of, care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land 
owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington, for the express purpose of conveying a roadway easement, 
ten (10) feet wide running parallel to and abutting Paddock Street all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B. Said parcels and interest are 
described as Map 50, Parcels 62 and 63; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Letter was received from Robert J. Troy, petitioner to withdraw this article. 
Motion to pass over by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira. Seconded and so 
voted . 

ARTICLE 47. (drawn as #34) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) the following 
described parcel of land: 

The land situated on Andover Street, Wilmington, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts and bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the easterly line of Andover Street, formerly called 
Woburn Street said point being at the northwest corner of land now or 
formerly of Leland B. and Carrie M. Chisholm; thence 

NORTHERLY: along said Easterly line of Andover Street, two hundred 

ninety-four (294.00) feet, more or less, to land now or 
formerly of Wilkinson, thence; 

NORTHEASTERLY: by land now or formerly of Wilkinson, one hundred seventy- 
five (175.00) feet, more or less, to the westerly shore of 
Foster's Pond, thence, 

SOUTHERLY: along the westerly shore of Foster's Pond, two hundred 

eighty (280.00) feet, more or less, to land now or formerly 
of Leland B. and Carrie M. Chisholm; thence 

SOUTHWESTERLY: along land now or formerly of Leland B. and Carrie M. 

Chisholm, one hundred eighty-six (186.00) feet, more or 
less, to the point of beginning. 

Containing 1.25 acres of land more or less. Being shown on a plan of land at 
Foster's Pond, Wilmington and Andover, dated September 1939, Andrew J. Kelly, 
Surveyor, recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, in Plan Book 63, 
Plan 26. For petitioner's title, see deed of Joseph A. Langone, Trustee, 
River Realty Trust, dated May 22, 1987 and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Book 4069, Page 26. 

The above-referenced parcel is also shown as Parcel 17 on Town of Wilmington 
Assessor's Map R-3; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert Volpe, 421 Andover Street, "I move that the town vote 
to amend the Zoning By-law and associated Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to 
Residential 20 (R-20) the following described parcel of land." 
Description reads the same as above. He stated he wished to have this 
land rezoned to enable his daughter and son-in-law to build a home on 
this parcel. He stated other land on Andover Street has been rezoned 
and only 750 feet away from his property is R-20. His daughter, Lori 
Beals, spoke also asking for the Town Meeting to rezone. This is our 
only chance to be able to build a house and stay in Wilmington. Mr. 



-168- 



zr.LS rezcmr.: 



:ei in Wilmin: 
= "Plan of : 



:ounty. 



by an 



ur.irei i::.00) 
r.ir.ecv (90.00) 



Nc?.r:->"ZS7Z?: 



c-e h\i-irei-tvrenz . 120.00) 



Zlf- = r. dared 



.reel 1; cr 



lA IS vzz 



169- 



ARTICLE 49. (drawn as #24) To see if the Tovm will vote to amend the Zoning 
Map and associated Zoning By-laws of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 20 (R-20) to General Industrial (GI) the following 
described parcels of land: 



The land in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and being two 
parcels of land shown on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, MA, December 22, 1970, 
Marion T. Murphy and surveyed by Charles H. Moloy, Woburn, MA, Registered 
Land Surveyor, recorded in Plan Book 120, Plan 1 of Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds, said parcels being bounded and described as follows: 



Parcel 1 

The certain parcel of land being shown as "D" on said Plan bounded; 



NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHWESTERLY 
NORTHWESTERLY 



by Main Street; 

by Lot "C" as shown on said plan; 

by Old Main Street as shown on said plan; and 

by Kerrigan Park. 



Parcel 2 

The certain parcel of land being shown as "B" on said Plan bounded: 



NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHWESTERLY 



by Main Street, thirty-five (35) feet, more or less; 
by Lot "A" one hundred- twenty (12 0) feet, more or less; 
by Old Main Street, one hundred sixty-two (162) feet, more 
or less; 

by Lot "C" shown on said plan, one hundred forty-four (144) 
feet, more or less. 
Said Lot "B" contains 12,230 square feet of land, more or less. 



NORTHWESTERLY : 



For petitioner's title, see deed recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of 
Deeds, Book 7521, Page 126. 



The above referenced parcels are shown on Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 
25, Parcels 1 and lA; or do anything in relation thereto. 



Motion by James J. Rooney, for Mr. Miller, reads the same as above. 
This parcel he also seeks to rezone to use for a business. His 
Engineer, Mr. St. Hilaire, stated it would be unlikely anything would 
happen to the aquifer recharge area. It is difficult to tell where the 
line is for well fields. Mr. Lessard stated he is against this article 
for the same reasons he stated in Article 48. Planning Board 
recommends disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted. Requires 
2/3rds. Yes 19 No 84. Article defeated. 



ARTICLE 50. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcel of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to Residential 10 (R-10) , 
the buildings thereon situated in Wilmington being shown as Lot One (1) on a 
plan of land in Wilmington, MA. Dated April 5, 1988, K. J. Miller Co., Inc., 
Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors, 106 West Street, Wilmington, MA. 
Recorded September 25, 1995, with Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 
163, Page 333, Number 32167. Described as follows: 



-170- 



SOUTHEASTERLY: by Valyn Lane, by a curved line, by several lines measuring 

together 321 and 11/100 (321.11) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY: by Lot 5, 112 and 64/100 (112.64) feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY: by land now or formerly of Boston and Maine Railroad, 270 
(270.00) feet; 

NORTHEASTERLY: by Lot 13, 136 and 93/100 (136.93) feet; 

Containing 34,226 feet, r.ore or less, according to said plan. The above 
parcel is shown as Parcel 201 on To'.m of Wilmington Assessor's Map 90. Owned 
by Edward P. Loud and Doreen M. Loud of 4 Valyn Lane, Wilmington, MA; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Edward Loud, "I move that the to^/m vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington, by 
rezoning the following parcel of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to 
Residential 10 (R-10) , the buildings thereon situated in Wilmington 
being shown as Lot One fl; on a plan of land in Wilmington, MA, Dated 
April 5, 1988, K. J. Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers and Land 
Surveyors, 106 West Street, Wilmington, MA. Recorded September 25, 
1995, with Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 163, Page 333, 
Number 32167. Described as follows." Description reads the same as in 
above article. Mr. Loud would like to rezone this parcel to build a 
home for Doreen Loud's mother, Marilyn Cox. Mrs. Cox urged voters to 
approve this article, as there are hardship issues in the family. Mr. 
Komenchuk, 190 Salem Street, an abutter, is against this rezoning as it 
adversely affects his property. Selectman McCoy and Representative 
Miceli urged support for this article. Finance Committee recommends 
disapproval. Planning Board recommends disapproval of this article. 
Surroiinding land is zoned R-20. Rezoning to R-10 would be "spot" 
zoning for the economic benefit of the o^^ner and is not a legal zoning 
practice. Motion seconded. Article needs 2/3rds. Yes 94 No 80. 
Article fails. 

ARTICLE 51. (drav.T. as #29) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 60 'R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) that land described as land 
shown on Assessor's Map 10, Parcels 23, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 
40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 44A, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 and 51; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by To'rfn Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

Motion to adjourn was made at 5:40 p.m. Seconded and so voted. The 
attendance at To'^ Meeting >.-as as follows and the meeting adjourned at 5:40 
P.M. 



11:05 A.M. - 150 
5:00 P.M. - 339 



12:15 P.M. - 
Non-Voters - 



- 251 

- 30 



-171- 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 1999 



Total By Transfer By Taxation 

Appropriation 

133 , 613 133 , 613 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY 2 000 



Total 

Appropriation 



By Transfer 



By Taxation 



SCHOOL BUDGET 
MUNICIPAL BUDGET 
CAPITAL OUTLAY 
WARRANT ARTICLES 



20, 509, 592 
20,431, 869 
814 , 048 
37, 550 



444 , 983 




20, 509, 592 
19, 986, 886 
814 , 048 
37 , 550 



TOTAL BUDGET 
STATUTORY CHARGES 
TOTAL 



41, 793 , 059 
4 , 133 , 116 
45 , 926 , 175 



444 , 983 
74, 022 
519, 005 



41 , 348 , 076 
4, 059, 094 
45,407, 170 



AVAILABLE FUNDS : 

CAPITAL STABILIZATION FUND 

CEMETERY SALES 

CEMETERY INTEREST 

STATUTORY CHARGES 

WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 

TOTAL 





40, 000 
20, 000 
74, 022 
384 , 983 
519, 005 



BONDING AUTHORIZED 
BONDING RESCINDED 



$2, 000, 000 
$1, 000, 000 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 15, 1999 
WITH ACTION TAfCEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS : In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the 
manner prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs 
to meet and assemble at the Barrows Auditorium, Wilmington High School, 
Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on Monday, the fifteenth day of 
November 1999, at 7:30 P.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. (drawn as #4) To see if the town will vote to appropriate 

an additional sum of money for the design and construction of sewers, sewage 
systems and disposal facilities known as the Route 3 8 Corridor Sewer Project 
and to accept interests in land as may be required, and to determine whether 
said funds shall be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by 
borrowing under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, or by any 
combination thereof; and further to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to apply for any federal and 
state aid and to receive gifts which may be available as contributions to be 
applied toward the cost of the project; or do anything in relation thereto. 



-172- 



Motion by Mr. Russell, Water & Sewer Commissioner, "I move that the 
town vote to raise and appropriate by transfer from available funds 
from the following accounts: the sum of $102 ,456 from the Sewer 
Construction Account; the sum of $7,266 from the Northeast Sewer 
Interceptor - Engineering Account; and the sum of $10 , 932 from the Main 
Street Sewer Account, the total being $120 , 654 all of which projects 
have been completed with balances remaining and as authorized by 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 20, for the purpose of providing an 
additional sum of money for the design and construction of sewers, 
sewage systems and disposal facilities known as the Route 3 8 Corridor 
Sewer Project and to accept interests in land as may be required." 
Additional funding is needed for this project. Some underground 
utilities were not noted on the plan and other problems have led to 
cost increases . Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. (drawn as #5) To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds in the fiscal year 
2000 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of various town 
departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Article 2a. Motion by Town Manager, Michael Caira, "I move that the 
town vote to appropriate the sum of $165 , 554 from available funds - 
fiscal year 1999 Additional Lottery Aid to the Unclassified and Reserve 
- Reserve Fund Account." Finance Committee recommends approval. 
Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

Article 2b. Motion by Town Manager, Michael Caira, "I move that the 
town vote to appropriate the sum of $200 , 000 from available funds - 
Local Receipts - Sewer to Sewer - Maintenance and Operations Account." 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously . 

Article 2c. Motion by Town Manager, Michael Caira, "I move that the 
town vote to appropriate the sum of $84,750 from available funds - 
Additional Chapter 70 School Aid for the purpose of performing building 
renovations and repairs to the Wilmington High School to include 
heating system improvements, the installation of new doors, the 
replacement of carpeting in the auditorium and other miscellaneous 
repairs . " Finance Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and 
so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. (drawn as #6) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 60 District to Planned Residential Development District (PRD) the 
following parcel of land: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of Elizabeth Drive and land of 
Walter & Celina Malatesta: 



N 


32° 


24 ' 


45" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


7.10 feet to a point, thence; 


N 


68° 


53 ■ 


06" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


165.52 feet to a point, thence 


N 


85° 


26 ' 


42 ' 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


64.64 feet to a point, thence; 


N 


19° 


45 ■ 


57" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


61.00 feet to a point, thence; 


N 


70° 


14 ' 


03 " 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


111.80 feet to a point, thence 


N 


81° 


36 ' 


54" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


89.71 feet to a point, thence; 



-173- 



s 


34° 


19 ' 


05" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


80 . 


00 feet to a point, 


thence ; 


N 


66° 


10 ' 


26" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


134 


.74 feet to a point, 


thence 


S 


31° 


42 ' 


18" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


288 


.76 feet to a point. 


thence 


S 


10° 


50 ' 


29" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


123 


.74 feet to a point. 


thence 


S 


09° 


06 ' 


52" 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


125 


.69 feet to a point. 


thence 


S 


08° 


53 ' 


30" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


14 . 


15 feet to a point. 


thence ; 


s 


89° 


40 ' 


02" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


17 . 


00 feet to a point. 


thence ; 


s 


79° 


20 ' 


33" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


87 . 


75 feet to a point. 


thence; 


s 


81° 


11 ' 


20" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


61 . 


30 feet to a point. 


thence ; 


s 


86° 


04 ' 


40" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


13 . 


95 feet to a point. 


thence ; 


s 


37° 


42 ' 


53 " 


East 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


242 


.00 feet to a point. 


thence 


s 


57° 


42 ' 


51" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


309 


.64 feet to a point. 


thence 


N 


32° 


24 ' 


45" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


284 


.67 feet to a point, 


thence 


N 


32° 


24 ' 


45" 


West 


for 


a 


distance 


of 


510 


.31 feet to a point. 


thence 


N 


32° 


24 ' 


45" 


West 


along 


Elizabeth Drive 


for a distance of 59.53 fe 



the point of beginning. Containing about 8.91 acres. 

Said land being further shown and described on a plan entitled "Princess 
Pines Commons". Prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc., 213 Broadway, 
Methuen, MA, a copy of which plan is on file with the office of the Clerk, 
and also filed in the office of the Planning Board. 

Meaning and intending to rezone from Residential 60 District to Planned 
Residential Development District (PRD) , a portion of that land shown on the 
Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map as Map 27, Parcel 14; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Attorney Dan Brown, reads the same as above article and moves 
to amend said article by adding the following paragraph: 

As required by Section 7.3.1 of the Wilmington Zoning By-law reference 
is herein made to the proponent's written proposal for an age 
restricted, 55 years of age or older residential development with 
children excluded, entitled "Princess Pines Commons of Wilmington, MA" 
dated September 8, 1999 and to the conceptual plans required for a 
Planned Residential Development District which have been filed with the 
Wilmington Planning Board and which include the following: (1) 
Existing Conditions Plan of Land in Wilmington, MA, Prepared for: 
Northeastern Development Corporation; Dated August 19, 1999; Scale: 1" 
= 40'; Prepared by: Andover Consultants, Inc., of Methuen, MA (2) 
Site Development Plan for Princess Pines Commons, Robert Anthony Drive, 
Wilmington, MA; Prepared for: Northeastern Development Corporation; 1" 
= 40'; Prepared by: Paul L. Davies & Assoc., Architects of Lowell, MA, 
(3) Front Elevation Plan for Princess Pines Commons, Robert Anthony 
Drive, Wilmington, MA; Prepared for: Northeastern Development 
Corporation; Prepared by: Paul L. Davies & Assoc., Architects of 
Lowell, MA, (4) First & Second Floor Plan - Building A; for Princess 
Pines Commons, Robert Anthony Drive, Wilmington, MA; Developers: 
Northeastern Development Corporation; Prepared by: Paul L. Davies & 
Assoc., Architects of Lowell, MA, Scale Vt" = 1'; Dated September, 1999. 
Said floor plan identifies two bedrooms per unit for a total of 46 
bedrooms. No dens are included in any unit floor plan; (5) Landscaping 
Plan Typical Cluster; Scale 1" = 10'; for Princess Pines Commons, 
Robert Anthony Drive, Wilmington, MA; Prepared for: Northeastern 



-174- 



Development Corporation; Prepared by: Weinmayr Assoc. Inc., Landscape 
Architects & Land Planners of Somerville, MA and Paul L. Davies & 
Assoc., Architects of Lowell, MA." 

Motion seconded. Planning Board recommendation is a split vote two (2) 
in favor and two (2) against. Finance Committee recommends approval. 
The plan shown by Attorney Brown indicates more open space area, 67%, 
and will be connected to town water and sewer. This development has an 
age requirement of fifty-five (55) and over, with children excluded. 
Units cannot be resold without approval of association. Mr. Kelly, 
Traffic Engineer for the developer stated additional traffic would not 
impact the area negatively, as this type of development would only add 
nine (9) vehicle trips in the morning and eleven (11) vehicle trips in 
the afternoon. This is only a zoning change, the applicant must also 
petition the Planning Board for a Special Permit. Much discussion was 
heard as many members of the community spoke both for and against the 
article. Discussion took almost one hour as environmental concerns and 
the need for open space were among the many issues discussed. Article 
requires a 2/3rds vote. Yes 211 No 142. Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 4. (drawn as #1) To see if the town will vote to allow an easement 
across two town lots for the installation of a sewer extension for Christine 
Drive. Said Lots are located on Assessor's Map 44. The amount of usage for 
an easement from these lots are: Lot #144 - 84 square feet and Lot #146 - 
235 square feet; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by John Murphy, 9 Christine Drive, to allow sewer line extension 
for the residents of Christine Drive. An easement over town-owned 
property is needed. Town Manager, Michael Caira stated easement is 
considered surplus. Principal Assessor, H. Skip Moynihan set the fair 
market value at $500. Residents will bear entire cost of project under 
the supervision of the Water and Sewer Department . Amendment by James 
Morris of the Conservation Commission, wording to be added to article, 
subject to the approval of the Conservation Commission. Finance 
Committee recommends approval . Motion seconded and so voted as 
amended. 2/3rds vote declared by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 5. (drawn as #3) To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law of the Town of Wilmington relative to the sale of used vehicles by 
taking the following actions : 

(1) Amend Section 3.5.16 Vehicle Dealership to read as follows: 

New Vehicle Dealership - Salesroom and related dealership facilities for new 
automobile, truck, boats, motorcycles, farm implements, light industrial 
equipment and similar light vehicles having a maximum 6,000 pound gross 
vehicle weight or 135 inch wheel base. Open air displays of vehicles is 
permitted if located on the same site as the salesroom and related 
facilities . 

(2) Add a new Section 4.1.13 as follows: 

Used Vehicle Sales - In the General Business (GB) and General Industrial (GI) 
Districts, auto repair and body shops may use the paved portion of their lot 
for the sale of used vehicles. No used vehicle shall be parked within 20 
feet of the sideline of the street. "For Sale" signs covering not greater 
than 20% of the vehicle windshield are permitted, and must be attached to the 



t 



-175- 



vehicle. All other signs advertising used vehicle sales are prohibited. Up 
to two (2) vehicles may be displayed for sale. 

The sale of used vehicles is allowed at new vehicle dealerships, provided the 
vehicles are displayed on the same site as the salesroom and related 
dealership facilities; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Alex Quandt reads the same as above. This article would 
allow the sale of two (2) used cars at repair shops within the Town of 
Wilmington. This would help generate money back into the repair shops. 
It would also include gas stations . Planning Board recommends 
disapproval. Finance Committee recommends approval. This required 
2/3rds vote. Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 258 No 43. Article is 
approved . 

ARTICLE 6. (drawn as #2) To see if the town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington, hereinafter described, to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington, for the express purpose of conveying the same in order to 
provide affordable housing, all in accordance with the General Laws Chapter 
30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized to grant and 
convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in 
accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as 
follows: Map 40, Parcels 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 109, 110, 116, 
117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131; or do anything in relation 
thereto . 

Town Moderator, James Stewart stated a letter was received from the 
petitioner requesting to withdraw this article. Motion made and 
seconded to pass over. So voted. 

Total attendance at Town Meeting was three hundred ninety-one (391) voters 
and twenty-two (22) non-voters. Meeting adjourned at 9:15 p.m. 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIAL 



Directory of Officials - January 1, 2000 



Board of Selectmen 



Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
James J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 
Michael V. McCoy 
Michael J. Newhouse 



2000 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2002 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



2000 



School Committee 



Suzanne Spiris Cushing, Chairman 
Thomas W. Siracusa, Vice Chairman 
Joan M. Duffy, Secretary 
Susanne L. Clarkin 
Nora J. Zinan 
Stephen P. Peterson 
Barbara K. Breakey 



2001 
2000 
2001 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2002 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty, III, Vice Chairman 

Barry J. Mulholland, Secretary 

Robert D. Ennis 

Paul J. Sweeney 

William A. Cole 

John M. Walsh 

Ann L . Yurek 

William J. Dowd 



2000 
2002 
2002 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2002 



■177- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1999 



Appeals, Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 

Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 

John R. Forrest 

Robert L. Doucette, Associate 

Raymond N. Lepore, Associate 

David L. Spurr, Associate 

Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

Anthony E. Krzeminski 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 
Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Bradford L. Jackson 
Ruth Kennedy 
A. Quincy Vale 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 
H. Elizabeth White, Chairperson 
Ann H. Berghaus, Rec . Sec. 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas . 
Adele C. Passmore, Publicity 
Andrea B. Houser, Corr . Sec. 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Chairman 

Cynthia A. McCue 

Willis C. Lyford 

Community Development Grant 

Advisory Committee 

Frank A. Botte 

Joyce Brisbois 

John Doherty 

Carolyn Donovan 

Raymond G. Forest 

Michael J. Newhouse 

Michael Ruest 

Anthony Triglione, Sr. 

Conservation Commission 
James H. Morris, Chairman 
Judith A. Waterhouse, V. Chmn. 
Mark J. Brazell 
Jolene S. Lewis 
Richard J. Patterson 
Lisa A. Brothers 
Derek P. Fullerton 



Term 
Expires 

2002 
2000 
2001 
2000 
2000 
2000 



2001 
2000 
2002 



2001 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2002 



2000 
2001 
2002 



2001 
2001 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2002 
2002 



Disabilities, Commission On 

Phyllis P. Genetti, Chairman 

Charlotte A. Guthrie 

George B. O'Connell 

Frank A. Botte 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 

Richard Gage 

James J. Rooney, Sel . Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 
Joseph C. Filipowicz, Chair. 
Frank J. Rat to, V. Chairman 
Eveyln T. Kaminski 
Henry C. Latta 
William Nee 
Marilyn K. McCarthy 
Joseph A. Paglia 

Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Gregory P. Erickson 

Roger J. Lessard 

Michael Morris 

Donald N. Onusseit 

Daniel W. Paret 

Bobby N. Stewart 

Daniel R. Stewart 

Michael J. Woods 

Health, Board of 
James A. Ficociello, Chmn. 
Eugene L. Kritter 
Elizabeth E. Sabounjian 

Historical Commission 
Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas. 
Frank J. West 
Paul L. Chalifour 
James T. Murray 
Jean M . Rowe 

Housing Authority 

Lillian C. C. Hupper, Chairman 

Dorothy A. Butler, Treasurer 

Robert DiPasquale, Vice Treas. 

Vacancy 

Vacancy - State Appointee 



2002 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2001 
2002 



2001 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2001 
2002 
2002 



2001 
2000 
2002 



2002 
2001 
2000 
2001 
2002 
2002 



2000 
2002 
2003 
2001 
2001 



-178- 




Boards, Committees & Commissions 1999 



Term 
Expires 



2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 



Term 
Expires 



Housing Partnership 

Raymond G. Forest, Chairman 

Charles E. Boyle, V. Chairman 

Gregory P. Erickson 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. 

Daniel W. Paret 

Lester E. White 

Lynn G. Duncan, Director 

Daniel C. Wandell, Sel . Liaison 



Library Trustees 

Mary J. Deislinger, Chairman 2001 

Martha K. Stevenson, V. Chmn. 2001 

Joan S. Grady 2000 

Lester E. White 2000 

James F. Banda 2 002 

Anne Buzzell 2002 

Master Plan Committee 

Kevin Brander, Co-Chairperson 

Scott C. Garrant, Co-Chairperson 

Kenneth J. Lifton, Vice Chairperson 

Robert Peterson, Secretary 

Charles E. Boyle 

Susanne L. Clarkin 

Raymond G. Forest 

James Gil lis 

John Goggin 

Virginia Hahn 

Michael Hodge 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Joseph Langone 

Jolene S. Lewis 

Richard Longo 

Paul Melaragni 

Michael J. Newhouse 

James J. Rooney 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Barbara Sullivan 

Jay Tighe 

Ann L . Yurek 



Open Space Committee 

John B. Keeley, Co-Chairman 

James Morris, Co-Chairman 

Betty M. Bigwood 

Leland B. Chisholm 

Christina Grill 

Richard H. Grinder, Jr. 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Joseph M. Kennedy 

Kenneth J. Lifton 

Barry J. Mulholland 

Iva Marie Rideout 

Jean M . Rowe 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Barbara Sullivan 

Suzanne M. Sullivan 

Ronald N. Swasey 

Mark Zinan 

Nora J. Zinan 

Permanent Building Committee 
Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 
Joseph A. Langone 
Paul J. Melaragni 
Randi R. Holland 
John C. Holloway 

Planning Board 
James L. Diorio, Chairman 
Scott C. Garrant 
Michael Sorrentino 
Kevin J. Brander 
Richard M. Green 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 

C. Michael Burns, V. Chairman 

Debra J. Gray 

Larry G. Noel 

Jay Tighe 

Redevelopment Authority 
Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 
Patricia F. Duggan*, V. Chairman 
Paul C. Logan, Treasurer 
Christopher P. Barry, Asst. Tr. 
A. Mark Zinan, Secretary 
* State Appointment 



2002 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2002 



2001 
2000 
2002 
2003 
2004 



2000 
2002 
2000 
2001 
2001 



2001 
1998 
2003 
2004 
2001 



179- 




Boards, Committees & Commissions 1999 



Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 
James M. Gillis 
Robert G. Peterson 

Registrars, Board of 

Edward L. Sousa, Chairman 

Alice M. Hooper 

Barbara J. Buck 

Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Scholarship Fund Committee 

Geraldine A. O'Donnell, Chair. 

Florence J. Athanasia 

Barry R. Cahill 

Susanne L. Clarkin 

John J. DeMarco 

Robert G. Peterson 

Silver Lake Steering Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Karen T. Boeri 

George W. Boylen 

Celia F. Cornish 

Walter J. Dalton 

Gregory P. Erickson 

John B. Keeley 

Donald N. Onusseit 

Ronald N. Swasey 

Town Forest Committee 
Robert P. Palmer 
Frederick L. Jaeschke 
Forrest G. Downs 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris 
Lorraine P. Dineen 
Stanley E. Smith 



Term 
Expires 



2000 
2001 



Term 
Expires 



2002 
2000 
2001 



2002 
2002 
2002 
2002 
2002 
2002 



2000 
2001 
2002 



2000 
2000 
2000 



Waste Water Study Advisory Committee 

George Allan, Chairman 

Kevin Brander 

Gregory Erickson 

Derek Fullerton 

Matthew Kane 

Joseph Langone 

Raymond Lepore 

Michael Newhouse 

Donald Onusseit 

Ronald Swasey 

Richard Tomczyk 

Michael Woods 

Ann Yurek 



Water and Sewer Commissioners 
Richard A. Longo, Chairman 
Matthew J. Kane 
Frederick W. Russell, Jr. 

Wilmington Arts Council 
David J. Maison*, Chairman 
H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 
Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 
Frances D. Keough* , Corr.Sec. 
Jane M. Crane*, Rec . Sec. 
Annette Campbell* 
Carmelo J. Corsaro* 
Marguerite Elia 
Evelyn Choate Gibbs 
Bruce E. Jope* 
Edith M. Michelson* 
Augustine E. Rice 
Francis T. Toohey* 
Hinda Paquette 
Carolyn L. Stanhope 

* Advisory Board members 



2001 
2000 
2002 



2000 
2001 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2001 
2001 



Veterans' Memorial Monument Committee 

Joseph Steen, Chairman 

Robert Corcoran 

Carolyn Harris 

Thomas Marden 

Gerald O'Reilly 

James Rooney 

Edwin Williams 



-180- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1999 

Term 
Expires 

Wilmington Election Officers 



Term 
Expires 



Precinct 1 



Annually Precinct 4 



Annually 



Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Joan Goulet, Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Dep.Insp. 
Heidi Sutherland, Dep. Insp . 
Jenna Volpe, Dep. Insp. 
Priscilla R. Ward, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 2 

Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Dep. Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Shirley Pumfrey, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 3 

Mary E . Woods , Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 
Ruth J. Bedell, Clerk 
Minnie Kirby, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Inspector 
Patricia McKenna, Inspector 
Shirley Brush, Dep. Insp. 
Audrey E. Riddle, Dep. Insp. 



Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth L. Coville, Dep. Clk 
Anita Backman, Dep. Insp. 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Dep. Insp. 
Denise M. Kearns, Dep. Insp. 
Florence Webster, Dep. Insp. 
Marilyn West, Dep. Insp. 
Dorothy L. Peters, Tally Clerk 

Precinct 5 

Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Clerk 
Veronica M. DiOrio, Dep. Insp. 
Nancy A. Luciano, Dep. Insp. 
Melissa Mobile, Dep. Insp. 
Marion J. Woller, Dep. Insp. 

Precinct 6 

Evelyn W. Conlin, Warden 
Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Warden 
Jean M. Draper, Inspector 
Ada Peters, Inspector 
Jane Finn, Dep. Insp. 
Margaret L. Perry, Dep. Insp. 



•181- 



Officers And Department 


Heads - January 1, 2 000 






Accountant 


Michael Morris 


694 


-2029 


Administrative Assistant 


Margaret A. Tarantino 


658 


-3311 


Animal Control/Inspector 


Ellen G. Davis 


658 


-7845 


Assistant Town Manager 


Jeffrey M. Hull 


658 


-3311 


Assessor, Principal 


Humphrey J. Moynihan 


658 


-3675 


Community Development Program Director 


Michael J. Duff 


658 


-9843 


Constable 


Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 


658 


-6140 


Elderly Services Director 


Theresa Marciello 


657 


-7595 


Emergency Management Director 


Daniel R. Stewart 


658 


-3346 


Fire Chief 


Daniel R. Stewart 


658 


-3346 


Housing Authority Exec. Director 


Karen DeJoie 


C C Q 

boo 


Q c "a 1 

- O 3 J 1 


Inspector of Buildings 


Daniel W. Paret 


658 


-4531 


Ipswich River Watershed Assoc. 


John B. Keeley 
Herbert D. Nickerson 


694 
658 


-2024 
-4207 


Librarian 


Christina A. Stewart 


658 


-2967 


Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 


Michael V. McCoy 


658 


-3311 


Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board 


Michael J. Woods 


658 


-4711 


Metropolitan Area Planning 
Council 


Lynn G . Duncan 


boo 


- a z J a 


Middlesex Canal Commission 


Betty A. Bigwood 
Richard J. Mclnnes 


657 


-7870 


Museum Curator 


Kathleen Black Reynolds 


658 


-5475 


Northeast Solid Waste Committee 


Michael A. Caira 


658 


-3311 


Planning/Conservation Director 


Lynn G. Duncan 


658 


-8238 


Plumbing and Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


658 


-4531 


Police Chief 


Bobby N. Stewart 


658 


-5071 


Public Buildings Superintendent 


Roger J. Lessard 


658 


-3017 


Public Health Director 


Gregory P. Erickson 


658 


-4298 


Public Health Nurse 


Ann V. FitzGerald, R.N. 


694 


-2041 


Public Works Superintendent 


Donald N. Onusseit 


658 


-4481 


Reading Municipal Light Dept . 
Advisory Board 


Roger J. Lessard 
Roger E. Stevenin 


658 
658 


-3017 
-5600 


Recreation Director 


Ronald N. Swasey 


658 


-4270 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


James J. Babineau (781) 


665 


-8301 


Town Clerk 


Kathleen M. Scanlon 


658 


-2030 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


658 


-3388 


Town Engineer 


Harold R. Gillam 


658 


-4499 


Town Manager 


Michael A. Caira 


658 


-3311 


Treasurer/ Collector 


Stanley E. Smith 


658 


-3531 


Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


694 


-2040 


Water & Sewer Superintendent 


Michael J. Woods 


658 


-4711 


Wiring Inspector 


Frederick Sutter 


658 


-4531 



-182- 



P," > ..4 X ' . 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates-2"'* & 4*^*^ Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Robert J. Cain, Chairman 
Michael V. McCoy 
Michael J. Newhouse 
James J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 

Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and 
recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the town; 
representing the town in all litigation to which the town is a party; acting 
as the Chief Fiscal Officer of the town; preparation and administration of a 
comprehensive annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and 
services on behalf of the town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the town's health, workmans 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the town's recycling program and insuring that the town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town Manager 
serves as staff director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with 
the preparation of the annual budget and provides general assistance to the 
Town Manager in other areas of municipal administration. 



Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon 



658-2030 



State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the town records the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 



■183- 



Town Accountant 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

- Michael Morris - 694-2029 



The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the town and prepares other financial records and 
reports as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation 
of the annual budget . 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Moynihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal 
property within the town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market 
value, except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as 
forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: 
(1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be 
raised from property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - Stanley E. Smith - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector 
monitors the town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term 
borrowing. The department serves as custodian of all town funds. All 
municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax title and 
foreclosure proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the 
Treasurer/Collector . 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual 
proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations 
and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants related to 
planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act - Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public 
interest issues related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, 
protection of public and private water supply, protection of ground water 
supply, prevention of pollution, protection of fisheries and protection of 
land containing shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include 
reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with 
the town and State wetlands statutes. In addition, the department manages 
several pieces of property throughout town which have been placed into the 
town's custody as conservation land. 



-184- 



Building Inspector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the town's Zoning By-law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 

Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services 
include restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings 
and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks and caterers. In 
addition, the department conducts percolation tests for the location of 
septic systems, septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds 
to citizen complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution 
and hazardous waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. 
This includes an annual rabies clinic for dogs and immunization for 
influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse 
provides blood pressure and cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In 
addition, the nurse provides home health care visits to elderly residents of 
the town. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number 



9-1-1 



The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention 
and extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire 
safety inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. 
All outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from 
the Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Fire fighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent care transport. 



Police Chief - Bobby N. Stewart - 658-5071 -- Emergency Number 



9-1-1 



The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 

-185- 



problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the 
maintenance of the town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree 
Division is responsible for the town's public shade and ornamental trees and 
maintenance of the trees on the Town Common. The Public Works Department is 
also responsible for the operation of the town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 
systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 
by the Water & Sewer Department . The Department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA) . 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling 
program for many household items, maintains a composting center for grass and 
leaf disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services 
for all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the 
complete set-up at all town elections and the annual and special town 
meetings . 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Examples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counseling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 

Library Director - Christina A. Stewart - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The 
library seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational 
library services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-nine 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-nine 
member towns. 



-186- 



Recreation Director - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 



The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots program, summer recreation program for children, ladies fitness, 
day trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at 
Halloween and a number of other programs. In addition, the Recreation 
Department offers resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney 
World. 

Veterans' Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for 
veterans and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is 
reimbursed in a large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of 
cash grants to cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The 
Veteran's Agent also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other 
programs administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 



-187- 



Boards, Coimnittees & Commissions 
Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 

APPEALS, BOARD OF 

ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

CARTER LECTURE FUND 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM. 

ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

PLANNING BOARD 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 



Date 

^ 3RD Monday 
2"° Wednesday 
2"° Thursday 
As Needed 
As Needed 
4"^^ Monday 

^ 3RD Wednesday 
As Needed 
3^^ Tuesday 
2"° Tuesday 

^ 3RD Tuesday 
2^"^ Monday 
1^"^ Tuesday 
2"° Wednesday 
3*^ Tuesday 
Monthly 

-|_ST ^ 3RD Tuesday 

1^'^ Thursday 

1^"^ or 2*^° Wednesday 

2^° Monday 

2"° & 4™ Wednesday 

2"'^ & 4™ Monday 

As Needed 

Alternate Thursdays 



Room Building 



12 
9 
9 



Time 



Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Arts Center 7:00 p.m. 
Town Hall 9:00 a.m. 



Town Hall 
Town Hall 



9:30 a.m. 
7:00 p.m. 



Sr. Center 1:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Town Hall 5 : 15 p.m. 
Harnden Tavern 7:30 p.m. 

Deming Way 2:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 6:00 p.m. 

Library 7:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Shaw. Tech. 7:30 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 

Town Hall 7:00 p.m. 



Town Hall 



5:00 p.m. 



-188- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE ( S ) 


Acorn Drive 


from 


Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 


385 


X J/ J7 O 




Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2 , 915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Agostino Drive 


from 


Gandalf Way 


999 


1979 




Agostino Drive 


from 


Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


580 


1996 




Aldrich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6, 740 


1894 




Allgrove Lane 


from 


Woburn Street 


470 


^ Z> -J 




Allgrove Lane 


from 


Allgrove Lane to dead-end 


430 


1 9 9fi 

-L J* ^ O 




Allenhurst Way 


from 


Woburn Street 


1, 161 


1994 




Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 


-L ^ O T 


Amherst Road 


from 


Shawsheen Ave to end of cul-de-sac 


1,500 


1996 




Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 




f irom 


-Lo li i\.LJciv_i L.KJ ucywiiLi nuj Liy ii u cii x\.*-jciu 


4 7 R 


1985 




Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apache Way 


from 


Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 


1, 675 


1998 




Apollo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Appletree Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


994 


1990 




Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3 , 754 


1966 


1978 


Ashwood Avenue 


from 


Andover St. thru cul-de-sac 


2 , 800 


1998 




Aspen Drive 


from 


Russell Road thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Avon Street 


from 


Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 


320 


1999 




Ayotte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Bailey Road 


from 


Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Rd 


165 


1998 




Bailey Road 


from 


Aldrich Rd. southeasterly to Bailey Rd. 538 


1999 




Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 


684 


1945 




Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


18 94 




Ballardvale St. 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12 , 000 


1894 


1985 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1, 005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Ave. 


440 


195 9 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1, 282 


1975 




Birch Road 


from 


Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 


345 


1999 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1, 197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Blanchard Road 


from 


Kendall Road 


625 


1989 




Blueberry Lane 


from 


Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


1, 600 


1998 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4 , 144 


1894 


1960 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 


1, 066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1, 017 


1938 






1971 



•189- 



STREET 

Bridge Lane 
Bridge Lane 
Broad Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Burnap Street 
Burnap Street 
Burt Road 
Butters Row 
Buzzell Drive 

Canal Street 
Carolyn Road 
Carson Avenue 
Carter Lane 
Castle Drive 
Catherine Avenue 
Cedar Street 
Cedar Crest Road 
Central Street 
Chandler Road 
Chapman Avenue 
Charlotte Road 
Chase Road 
Cherokee Lane 
Chestnut Street 
Church Street 
Clark Street 
Clorinda Road 
Colonial Drive 
Cochrane Road 
Columbia Street 
Concord Street 
Congress Street 
Cook Avenue 
Coolidge Road 
Corey Avenue 
Cornell Place 
Cottage Street 
Cottonwood Circle 
Crest Avenue 
Cross Street 
Crystal Road 
Cunningham St . 
Cushing Drive 
Cypress Street 



LOCATION 
from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 
from King Street 

from Main Street to Burlington Line 
from Grove Avenue 
from Winchell Road 

from Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 
from Main Street to Chestnut Street 
from Draper Drive to Evans Drive 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 

from North Street to Marcia Road 

from Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 

from Shawsheen Ave to beyond Norfolk Ave. 

from Burlington Ave left to Burlington Ave 

from Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 

from Burt Road to Harris Street 

from Pinewood Road to Judith Road 

from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 

from Adams Street to Kelley Road 

from Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 

from Gunderson Rd . to beyond Apollo Dr. 

from Hathaway Road 

from Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 
from Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 
from Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 
from Main Street to Church Street 
from Agostino Drive 

from Middlesex Avenue thru cul-de-sac 

from Forest Street to Wabash Road 

from Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 

from Federal Street to North Reading Line 

from Forest Street to Burlington Line 

from Main Street 

from Hathaway Road 

from Canal Street to Grand Street 

from Fordham Road 

from Main Street 

from Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 

from Ayotte Street 

from Main Street to Lowell Street 

from Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 

from Salem Street to Beeching Ave 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Glen Road 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



455 
754 
377 
588 
145 
484 
653 
577 
600 



505 
268 
017 
411 
325 
. 000 
687 
1, 100 
552 
400 
1,575 
859 
297 
812 
11,480 
4,285 
2 ,470 
887 
375 
800 
1, 150 
5 , 803 
977 
813 
270 
366 
747 
927 
280 
558 
697 
895 
2 , 447 
990 
260 



1894 
1894 
1954 
1894 
1953 
1945 
1945 
1894 
1971 



1946 



1939 1955 

1960 1971 

1961 

1957 

1997 

1966 

1945 

1963 

1950 

1957 

1951 1971 

1971 

1953 

1999 

1894 

1894 

1894 1969 
1979 
1997 
1947 

1908 1933 

1894 

1939 

1946 

1951 

1951 

1982 

1954 

1998 

1947 

1894 

1996 

1944 1952 1953 

1993 

1951 



Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1, 760 


1964 


Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 


Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1, 7 94 


1958 


Dexter Street 


from 


Main Street 


480 


1979 


Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1, 402 


1954 


Dogwood Lane 


from 


Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 



-190- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Dorchester Street 
Dorothy Avenue 
Douglas Avenue 
Draper Drive 
Drury Lane 
Dublin Avenue 
Dunton Road 



from Billerica Line 

from Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 
from Palmer Way 

from Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 
from Glen Road to School Street 
from Main Street 
from Nassau Avenue 



1, 214 
1, 490 
1, 017 
1, 560 
633 
500 
649 



1951 

1960 
1989 
1959 
1963 
1951 
1956 



1971 



Eames Street from 

Earles Row from 

Edward Road from 

Elizabeth Drive from 

Ella Avenue from 

Elwood Road from 

Emerson Street from 

Englewood Drive from 

Evans Drive from 

Everett Avenue from 



Main Street to Woburn Street 
Route 62 

Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 
Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 
Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Forest Street 

Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 
Kenwood Drive 

Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 
Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham St . 



200 
820 
450 
348 
043 
642 
590 
455 
071 
480 



1894 
1994 
1947 
1999 
1978 
1968 
1951 
1971 
1971 
1979 



Fairfield Road from 

Fairmeadow Road from 

Fairmont Avenue from 

Fairview Avenue from 

Faneuil Drive from 

Faulkner Avenue from 

Faulkner Avenue from 

Fay Street from 

Federal Street from 

Ferguson Road from 

Fernbanks Road from 

Flagstaff Road from 

Fletcher Lane from 

Floradale Avenue from 

Flynn Way from 

Fordham Road from 

Forest Street from 

Fox Run Drive from 

Franklin Avenue from 

Frederick Drive from 

Freeport Drive from 



Main Street 

Nichols Street to Nichols Street 

Molloy Road 

State Street 

Massachusetts Avenue 

to beyond Harvard Avenue 

Glen Road to Jacobs Street 

Faulkner Ave northeasterly to dead end 

Glen Road to Garden Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 

Nichols Street 

Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 
Burlington Avenue 

Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 
North Reading Line 
Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
High Street 

Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Salem Street 

Park Street to Lucaya Circle 



299 
328 
952 
648 

790 
946 
125 
714 
740 
073 
550 
587 
792 
627 
680 
714 
100 
975 
739 
070 
086 



1946 
1958 
1971 
1933 

1950 
1944 
1999 
1938 
1894 
1967 
1996 
1989 
1977 
1970 
1996 
1971 
1894 
1989 
1978 
1966 
1979 



1953 



1945 



1976 



Gandalf Way 
Gatehouse Lane 
Gearty Street 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gloria Way 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Avenue 
Grant Street 



from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 549 1979 

from Towpath Road 3 80 1994 

from Ring Avenue 627 1989 

from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 6,870 1894 

from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 1,304 1952 

from Suncrest Avenue 3 65 195 9 

from Broad Street 770 1989 

from Park Street to Marcus Road 941 1956 

from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 2,514 1966 

from Corey Avenue 815 1952 

from Federal Street 780 1943 



191 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE ( S ) ACCEPTED' 



Great Neck Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


536 


1989 




Grove Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4 , 147 


1910 




Grove Street 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1957 




Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1, 506 


1959 


1966 


Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 




Hanover Street 


from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1988 




Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


1969 




Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 




Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 




Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1, 312 


1971 




Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 




Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 




Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3 ,270 


1951 


1953 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 




Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1, 286 


1979 




Henry L. Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


651 


1993 




High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3 , 585 


1894 




Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2 , 230 


1914 




Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 




Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,560 


1945 


1951 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3, 051 


1894 


1972 


Houghton Road 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1, 702 


1985 




Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 




Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 398 


1938 


1949 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1 , 248 


1968 




Jewel Drive 


from 


Eames Street 


1, 303 


1985 




Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 




Jonspin Road 


from 


Andover Street 


3 , 800 


1993 




Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 




Ka j in Way 


from 


Woburn Street 


455 


1989 




Kelley Road 


from 


Chandler Road 


923 


1957 




Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1,420 


1945 




Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 


1 , 725 


1970 


1971 


Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


693 


1958 




Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1, 840 


1894 




King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2,400 


1940 


1945 


King Street Ext. 


from 


Glen Road 


487 


1979 




Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 




Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3 , 855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4 , 013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1, 760 


1950 





1959 



1952 
1975 



1951 



-192- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE ( S ) 


Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 050 


1951 




Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Lorin Drive 


from 


Swain Road 


560 


1992 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10 , 152 


1894 


1978 


Lowell St. Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2 , 469 


1979 




Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from 


Tap 1 in Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21, 387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2 , 806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2 ,315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn St . to beyond Gunderson Road 


1, 525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond 












Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marion Street 


from 


Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 




Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1, 392 


1951 




Massachusetts Ave 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


i y 4 D 




McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2 , 621 


1944 




Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




Meadow Lane 


from 


Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


19 97 




Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12 , 140 


1894 




Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 












Wedgewood Avenue 


1, 528 


1967 




Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 




Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 




Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1, 298 


1908 


1988 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1, 566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1 , 057 


1971 




Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 801 


1894 




Nickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


194 7 




Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 




North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3, 515 


1945 




N. Washington Ave 




from Agostino 


Drive 


P R 
O D O 


1 Q 7 Q 


Nottingham Drive 


from 


Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 




Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2 , 301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1, 730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 




Oxbow Drive 


f rpm 


Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 





-193- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE (S) 


Palmer Way 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,437 


1989 




Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4 , 180 


1895 




Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2 , 000 


1919 




Patches Pond Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1, 185 


1990 




Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 




Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Phillips Avenue 


f rojn 


Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


1954 


Pilcher Drive 


from 


the end of Gearty Street 


410 


1989 




Pilling Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 




Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Pineridge Road 


from 


North St . to Linda Road 


914 


1960 




Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 




Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1 , 364 


1954 




Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 




Powder House Cir. 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 




Presidential Dr. 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 




Presidential Dr. 


from 


Presidential Dr. thru cul-de-sac 


768 


1998 




Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 




Quail Run 


from 


Woburn Street 


500 


1992 




Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 




Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 




Reading Avenue 


from 


Oakwood Road 


215 


1979 




Reading Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead- 


end 160 


1997 




Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 




Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Ave . to beyond Harold Ave 


1,090 


1971 




Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


1, 817 


1989 




Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 800 


1973 




Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 




Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1, 150 


1975 




River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave 


453 


1962 




Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1 , 861 


1967 




Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 




Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1, 980 


1946 




Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3 , 343 


1958 




Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1, 043 


1951 




Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond 












Ballardvale Street 


8, 895 


1894 




Salem Street 


from 


North Reading Line to beyond 












Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 




Sarafina's Way 


from 


Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


450 


1995 




Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 




School Street 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1, 139 


1915 


1963 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 




Serenoa Lane 


from 


Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1999 




Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 




Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2 , 904 


1950 


1958 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richmond Street to 












Billerica Line 


11, 845 


1894 




Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 




Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1, 021 


1951 


1971 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 





-194- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



O -L X V C J- J—ICLJ\.^ .n. V ^ • 


f rom 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


OkJcii-iidwis. i^i. J. vc 


from 


Park Street to Heather Drive 

X OL ^ J V k-' L- .1- V_ V_. Li Iw \w/ X X ^ L> X X * — - J- J—' X. J. V Var 


361 


1979 




f rom 


Shady" Lane Dr i ve 


690 


1952 




f rom 


Rp1 mon i~ Avr 1~o Ra "i T~v'i f^w Avp 

U X 1 1 IWX 1 L, xi V ^ • L. V-* X d X X V X ^ W v C • 


315 


J. J J J 


C +~ (^"n o Vi ^ H r^T"! "^rP^ 
O UvJIlCilC-iy C lyi. J. V c 


f rom 


r^aQt'lp T)y ■nor"t"}if=*T*1\/ t~i i onl -df='-c;ar' 

\_. d o y L C- l^X • lXLJXL.llCXXy L.11XL1 V^LIX V_1^ O d ^ 


14 


1997 




f rom 


TjOWPI 1 S1~T"PPt~ 

XJ \J W V_ JL i_/ 1— X. ^ 


908 


1955 


1 m r* T" Q 1" Av^=*niiP 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


^WCL^Xl iV \^ CI \_1 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


T;^"ft" Road 

J. Cl X- > IX. s--" CJ. VX 


f rom 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 


i. Cl tJ -L X 11 rt. V ^ 11 Lie 


f rom 


rv ^ ^ o .1- ^ .1- 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


1 liX Lloil ixLJ d Ll 


f rom 


cia 1 f:am ^ 1" T* 1" 1" o Mar"!?* r)T"'iv(=^ 

O d X v_- 1 L I ' -L ^ ^ >_ L> L^ 1 J d X X ^ X/ X X V ^ 


4 00 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from 


Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


X Iw'WLJCl L.li l^X- J. V ^ 


from 


TowDath Drive to a dead end 

X \^ VV k_/ U. L> XX J—' J- -L V \_> W 'wr U. VXiw tX VvX Vv X XLX 


463 


1990 


1. W d U 11 J-^ ^ X V c 


f rom 


r'Vipefnut Street to TowDath Drive 

X X ^ 1^ X X LX ^ L« X, v_ L^ L> L- L^ X W k../ tX L> X X X. -i- V V_ 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from 


Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracv Circle 


from 


Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


T'T'iim;^!! Rop^H 

X. x_ uiiicixx i V ex \_X 


f rom 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Uiinamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


TTrjf on Pou T*t 


f rom 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Va 1 vn Tiane 

V d ^ y XX x_i ux xxvm 


from 


Salem Street 


608 


1989 


V X. C1XXVX.C1. V V^XX LXv^ 


f rom 


Main Street 

1 ItX X, XX iw/ L' X. L«- L' 


847 


1916 


Vi Tcri n i a Road 

V -1- J_ ^ X X ^ tX X\> V_' tX tvL 


f rom 


No . Reading Line to No . Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 


Wakefield. Avenue 


from 


Buckingham St . easterly to dead end 


355 


1999 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 

1 XfJL. -i- XX L- X_ \^ ^— ' L' 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


f rom 


Wiahtman Road to Tewki^burv Line 

V* -L. XX L' 1 L ILX XX Xx.Li' fJL LX L^ X L.. W J V X./ LX X V XJ -L. XXL^ 


97 


1954 


Washinoton Avenue 

F* (X. ii^ X X -X X Iv ■v'X X V V_ XX LX \_ 


f rom 


Clark Street to Stone Street 

-X LX X tu/ L> X N— ' <u> w V — ' ^ L. Vw'XXLv hv/ L« X- L— Va> L^ 


1,650 


1920 


F V ^ XJ Xa' ^ i- LJ ^ J- ^ 


f rom 


RiiT"! Tncrt"on Avf^^mif^* 

J-J LXX XJ-XILJ L- L^ 1 X V \^ X X LX ^ 


677 


1969 


Wpdcipwood Avf=^'niiR 


f rom 


11 \y LJ X ^ O L- X ^ ^ L. 


4 7 6 


1967 


Wpdapwood Avpmip 


f rom 


WpdcTPWood AvR on t* h P*a Q 1" t^ViTii oiil -d^- 

Fl G ^ " L.^ L^LX V C • O W LX \— X X^ Cx O L> L« 11 X LX L^ LI X LX W 


- sac 7 5 


1997 


r1 ^ \^ X_ V-r \^ ^ 


f rom 


Wol^nyn .*^1"t"pp1~ to RpadiTici Tiinp 

> • LX X X X La- X V— ^ L> L- \J Xv^ d LX. X 11^ XJ X 1 1^ 


8,372 


18 94 


Wpc;t~dal p Ai/PTinp 

fVCO L.LXCIXC C\ V ^ 1 1 LI C 


f rom 


ri C. O L. OUXCCL. 


X , ^ J. X 


1 QA 9 


» V X »w iv o v^xx^_x^ 


f rom 


^ V C X C L« n. V dl LXCT 


^ O J 


1 Q7 1 


W"i ciVilrnan Road 

V* X ^ 11 1 1 Id 11 xS.^ d LX 


f rom 


WaT'T'PTi Road t*o T^pwlr ciV^ii y'v Tii tip 
F* d X X ^11 ixL^dvj. xcwrLounxy uxiic 


9 3 9 
^ ^ ^ 


J- ^ ^ 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1, 050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5, 290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1, 151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1, 146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23 , 122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1, 174 


1969 



1929 



1978 



1978 



-195- 



* * For Your Information * * 



Department I 

Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Appeals Board 
Arts Center 
Assessor 

Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Fire Prevention 
Harnden Tavern Museum 
Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/ Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 

Public Buildings Department 
Public Works Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Selectmen, Board of 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veterans' Agent 
Water & Sewer 



le Directory 
Telephone Number 



694 


-2029 




658 


-5071 


(Complaints ) 


658 


-7845 


(Missing/ Adopt ic 


658 


-4531 




657 


-3887 




658 


-3675 




658 


-4531 




658 


-3901 




658 


-3531 




657 


-7595 




658 


-4499 




658 


-3531 




658 


-3346 


(Business Phone) 


9 


-1-1 


(EMERGENCY) 


694 


-2006 




658 


-5475 




658 


-4298 




658 


-8531 




658 


-2967 




657 


-4625 


(TDD) 


658 


-4298 




658 


-8238 




658 


-3223 




658 


-5071 




9 


-1-1 


(EMERGENCY) 


657 


-8368 


(TDD) 


658 


-3017 




658 


-4481 




658 


-4270 




694 


-6000 




658 


-3311 




658 


-2030 




658 


-3311 




694 


-1417 


(TDD) 


658 


-3531 




658 


-2809 




694 


-2040 




658 


-4711 




658 


-3116 


(Billing) 



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30 Lancaster Street 
Boston, MA 02 114 



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